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The first title to have a PSN Pass included will be "Resistance 3"  (Source: tiptoptens.com)
The first title to have a PSN Pass included will be "Resistance 3," which will be released in September

Video game publishers know that they don't make any money on used video game sales, and have started to make this particular market less appealing for that reason. For instance, Capcom recently announced that it will apply the one-save game feature to "Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D," which will make it impossible for secondhand players to enjoy the experience of the game. In addition, Electronic Arts (EA) and THQ have started charging used and rental game players an extra fee for online content or features in specific games.

Now, Sony is taking a similar route by including a PSN Pass code in new copies of some first-party game titles. The PSN Pass is required to unlock full online access in these games.

"This is an important initiative as it allows us to accelerate our commitment to enhancing premium online services across our first party game portfolio," said Sony in a statement.

This new tactic aims to keep content locked away from secondhand gamers, thus keeping video game publishers from losing out on used game sales. Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA) Senior Vice President of publisher relations Rob Dyer has said that the company is frustrated with the lack of revenue from used games, and many other Sony executives like Andrew House, head of Sony's PlayStation business, support these new directives.

"I am a big believer in encouraging the gamer to have a reason to hold onto [a game] and to continue to play, and for the publisher to be able to see something if there is a second sale, because right now, for years, as a publisher, we saw nothing [from used sales]," said Dyer.

The first title to have a PSN Pass included will be "Resistance 3," which will be released in September.


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same same
By Smilin on 7/8/2011 10:48:04 AM , Rating: 5
All comments on this are going to say something similar: Sony is being a dick to consumers, or that this is understandable but being done all wrong (price, method etc).

Here is the big question for you though:
Are you willing to NOT play some game you really dig to send your message to Sony and other publishers?




RE: same same
By cjohnson2136 on 7/8/11, Rating: -1
RE: same same
By chick0n on 7/8/2011 9:06:25 PM , Rating: 1
if Sony's plan "succeeded," I'm sure Xbox will follow.

Look at AT&T, then T-mobile. now Verizon.


RE: same same
By HoosierEngineer5 on 7/8/2011 11:09:04 AM , Rating: 5
Absolutely. Been doing it for many years.

Just more Sony Baloney. Let them die.


RE: same same
By Smilin on 7/8/2011 12:32:53 PM , Rating: 2
It's been hit or miss with me. I've got a few games I boycott because of various BS but some I've just broken down and gotten anyway.

Draconian copywrite is my usual villan.


RE: same same
By Mitch101 on 7/8/2011 2:06:35 PM , Rating: 2
If Sony goes this route with a $60.00 game and you finish it in 10 hours I think you deserve to be able to resell it. This route Sony is taking punishes early adopters and wouldn't be a problem if they had a fee like Microsoft where even if the game is sold to someone else to play it online you need the Gold Pass.

Might as well carve another 10% off the Sony fan base that will migrate to an X-Box next time around who dont deal with this stupidity.


RE: same same
By HoosierEngineer5 on 7/8/2011 2:40:27 PM , Rating: 5
For PC games, give GOG.COM a look-see. No DRM at all. Some good games, and most are cheap.

And no, I have no affiliation with them other than being a happy customer. I like happy.


RE: same same
By B3an on 7/8/2011 5:20:05 PM , Rating: 2
Yep GOG is great!

And theres a simply solution when theres a game you want, but dont want to buy it because of DRM or some other ridiculous thing... pirate it.


RE: same same
By Anubis on 7/9/2011 11:11:12 PM , Rating: 2
yes i am willing to not play a game in an effort to boycott stupid shit
ive been doing it for years


RE: same same
By nikon133 on 7/10/2011 4:21:22 AM , Rating: 2
Talking only for myself here (and not trying to feed my opinion down others throat) - personally, I am OK with that.

At least as long as online gaming is free on PSN. That infrastructure needs to be maintained somehow, and that somehow requires money. Selling X million new copies makes much difference than selling X/2 new copies.

If Sony moves to subscription for online gaming (like X360 does), then hell no.

But as it is, I'm fine for buying new game for games with good on-line content. Replaying value makes it worth. For offline-only games, well, I will be looking at pre-owns as well. If offline game is somehow protected with code, I will just wait for new game price to go down if I don't think it is worth full price.

It just happens I am also PC gamer and most my PC buddies (me included) buy games from Steam anyway. You cannot sell Steam game. You cannot even borrow it or give it away to someone. How's this any worse?


By happyfirst on 7/8/2011 10:29:07 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
"I am a big believer in encouraging the gamer to have a reason to hold onto [a game] and to continue to play, and for the publisher to be able to see something if there is a second sale, because right now, for years, as a publisher, we saw nothing [from used sales]," said Dyer.


Whine, whine, whine, we don't make enough money. You want to do things like this? Fine, lock up your games, but then LOWER your prices some since you should be selling a lot more then. Or will you? How many used gamers just would not even pay for the game at it's new price? Or charge a lower fee for the game and a separate fee for online stuff that used gamers would need to repay for the online part.

And what if I sell my car, should the manufacturer somehow get something for that? Should the original builder of my house get a cut when I sell it?

I wonder if he would sign up for a world where chips are implanted in our eyes, ears, nose, and taste buds such that should I ever play a game, see a picture, hear a song, smell/taste something, that the chips ring up the $$$$$ for whomever made that?




By stepone on 7/8/2011 11:10:15 AM , Rating: 2
The only thing they really care about is their bottom line & thus the only way to stop the expanding use of such restrictions is to vote with your wallet!

Despite how people complain, Sony know that the vast majority of their customers will take it in the behind to play that must have game.

If people stopped buying games with these restrictions en masse they'd stop using them... oh who am I kidding, they'd just blame it on pirates & introduce even more restrictive DRM & gameplay measures.


By stepone on 7/8/2011 11:23:10 AM , Rating: 3
oh & just so people know I'm not a hypocrite, when Sony was hacked & I felt I couldn't trust them with my data anymore I sold my PS3 even though it meant not being able to play some of my fav games (like GT5 online) again.

Voting with your wallet is the only real power you have ... they may continue on this trend but at least then you're not an accomplice in the ruination of the games you love.


By quiksilvr on 7/8/2011 11:36:38 AM , Rating: 2
...So just make a dummy account or don't put your credit card info on there. I didn't use my real name or address and made a custom password for me email account. And in the end I got two free games and a month of Plus for free.

Now I am not too big on online games, but here is exactly what is going to happen.

What happens as supply of used games increase due to less demand? The price drops. Used games will dip even lower to compensate for these online pass purchases. Hell, some retailers could simply buy a pass themselves in bulk and include it with their used games. Anything is possible here.


We've had this forever on PC
By TheMan876 on 7/8/2011 11:05:42 AM , Rating: 3
Welcome to the way it's been on PC since the 90's. You get a CD-Key when you buy the game and you put it in before you can play MP. And guess what? You can't buy a used game and expect to be able to play online because you know that code already got used.

I remember reading comments of console gamers saying how much better their experience was because they didn't have to do the following:

1. Wait to install games
2. Type in and keep track of CD-Keys
3. Have to patch games that were released buggy

Now they have all these perceived problems without any of the benefits of PC gaming. I can't wait until they start saying how all these things are benefits. Oh sweet irony, I can taste it. *licks the irony*




RE: We've had this forever on PC
By Sunagwa on 7/8/2011 12:49:16 PM , Rating: 3
Odd post. This article has no bearing on PC games whatsoever. PC games have never supported a one-save feature such as this.

Also most PC games that use CD-Keys you can still uninstall and use on another computer, even MP ones. You just wont be able to use that same CD-Key at the same time online.

There is some truth to your point of not being able to buy a used copy of a MP/PC game and still being able to use it online (even this would only cover a small fraction of PC games). But I've been a big PC game consumer since the 90's and I have never heard of/run into a store/pawnshop that sells used PC games making it kind of a moot point.


By Milliniar on 7/8/2011 1:16:44 PM , Rating: 2
No where in this article does it say resistance 3 or any other ps3 game has one time save. The only game to do this was Resident evil mercenaries 3d. i use Past tense because Capcom has already said they will not do it in any other game...


RE: We've had this forever on PC
By porlino87 on 7/10/2011 11:26:09 AM , Rating: 2
Also, consoles usually are found in living rooms with family and friends playing together. I think this is a little different that PC/Steam games.

Imagine a family where two people like to play the same game online. Will they have to buy two copies?


RE: We've had this forever on PC
By Visual on 7/11/2011 5:30:02 AM , Rating: 2
Even if they had to buy two PC copies, it would still be cheaper than a single console copy, looking at the pricing of most multi-platform releases this generation.
And no, they will not have to buy two copies if they play split-screen on the same PC, or if they take turns playing it, like they do on the console.
So what the *beep* are you even talking about?


All I've got to say...
By cochy on 7/8/2011 10:28:17 AM , Rating: 4
The continuing war against the consumers. Was it always this way or is this some relatively new trend?




RE: All I've got to say...
By GulWestfale on 7/8/2011 10:36:22 AM , Rating: 3
They haven't even finished with the lulzsec mess, and now this. They really only have themselves when the next group if hackers hits them.


RE: All I've got to say...
By Boze on 7/9/2011 6:06:34 PM , Rating: 2
All hands brace for lulzpact...


RE: All I've got to say...
By Uncle on 7/8/2011 9:26:02 PM , Rating: 1
This is all about competition in the gaming world. Their is next to none. This kind of behavior didn't happen before because of competition in the market place.Any up and coming after they produce a good game gets bought out or squeezed out by the big Ignoramus's.


i'd like to highlight this
By inperfectdarkness on 7/8/2011 2:23:32 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Senior Vice President of publisher relations Rob Dyer has said that the company is frustrated with the lack of revenue from used games, and many other Sony executives like Andrew House, head of Sony's PlayStation business, support these new directives. "I am a big believer in encouraging the gamer to have a reason to hold onto [a game] and to continue to play, and for the publisher to be able to see something if there is a second sale, because right now, for years, as a publisher, we saw nothing [from used sales]," said Dyer.


this is no different that GM coming out against used car sales. i fully support a boycott of sony, given that this is their attitude.

crushing used-game sales isn't going to generate new revenue for your stupid company. it's going to drive more people to piracy. i can promise you that.




RE: i'd like to highlight this
By nikon133 on 7/10/2011 4:30:18 AM , Rating: 2
Do you also support boycott of Steam..?

Geez... I have a feeling most of "I wish Sony will die for this" don't have and never did have PS3. Really cannot understand that hatred.


By inperfectdarkness on 7/11/2011 7:10:11 AM , Rating: 2
even steam is positively angelic, comapred to what sony is trying to do here.

and for the record, i do use steam; and i don't approve killing off used game sales.


Used Games
By wallijonn on 7/8/2011 1:00:24 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
right now, for years, as a publisher, we saw nothing [from used sales],


If one buys a used game, say "Resistance 1," "Halo 1," "Oblivion 1," etc. & et. al., they are more likely to want to buy the newest game.

For example, I loved "Prince of Persia (2008)" and had to have some more. So I went out the day after finishing it and bought the latest Prince of Persia ("The Forgotten Sands") for $59.99 + tax. Absolutely hated the game. What a POS. I felt cheated. Two weeks later the price had plummeted to $19.99. It would have been better to buy the used version.

With Sony's new policy we gamers are more likely to rely much more heavily on game reviews. The net effect will be that new game sales will plummet. The industry will then counter with less expensive DLCs. But the flip side may be that we will demand longer demos. And even then we may decide not to buy it at all.

Personally, I don't game on-line. Will that mean that I can then command a premium over a game that has been registered? Exactly how would Game Stop verify this?

No, many people cannot afford $60 games, whereas they may be able to have a price point of $10, $20, $30 or $40. Given the choice of having to pay $60 for a game instead of buying three at $20 I will probably elect to only buy one or two games a year.

Sony, admit it. You and the publishers can no longer cry "Piracy" every time you see your sales go down. You cannot believe that your prices are too high. So you concoct a new scheme, one that blames used games. Once you get rid of used games you will be faced with the same problem: less revenue. Most people cannot afford your prices and so will likely do without. That's when you will see your console sales plummet. Game Over.

Game over, man, game over.




Perfect world...
By Threefeet on 7/10/2011 8:48:57 AM , Rating: 2
In a perfect world, retailers would pay a % of used game sales to the appropriate publishers. As it stands, retailers are making an absolute killing off the used market and are doing so by cannabilising the very industry they are a part of.




RE: Perfect world...
By Arsynic on 7/11/2011 8:08:19 AM , Rating: 2
Fuck off. Would your statement be true in any other market? Should a used car dealer give the auto giants a cut? What about consignment shops that sell used clothes? Should Goodwill be forced to give Sony a cut of the used TV they sold?


Accelerating commitment?
By sabbede on 7/8/2011 10:41:27 AM , Rating: 3
How exactly are they enhancing anything apart from their wallets? Are they suggesting that playing used games is somehow detrimental to their online service? That other users suffer because of 2nd hand sales?
I'm not sure that's actually the case.

Either way, its not going to work. All this will accomplish is an end to used PS3 games. It may well hurt sales of new games for that matter.
How many people buy used games because they can't afford the exorbitant prices charged for new games? Or pay those prices because they know they can recoup some of that cost when they sell the game back? How many people shell out $60 for a five hour long game simply because they know they can trade it in later?

I just hope Sony suffers worse than the gamers.




Meh
By Rage187 on 7/8/2011 11:24:59 AM , Rating: 3
I don't buy games for the multiplayer. I haven't upped my xbox live subscription to gold in a year. Hopefully, this directive makes used games cheaper.




Oh Internet, I love you
By ascian5 on 7/8/2011 1:01:56 PM , Rating: 1
I don't know I I'd call it hypocrisy, but these articles are always followed by consumers crying out to the heavens in outrage at their restricted freedoms. But how is what you want to do any differed than what companies are trying to do? Granted there are wrong methodologies like the one-time sAve and many drm implementations, but come on. This is a capitalist society and there are billions of dollars being left on the table under the current system. Should Gamestop get all that cash instead of the people who put hours of their lives into it? I'd love tO hear a valid reason as to why video game companies should not be allowed to protect their cntent so long as it does not restrict the end-users ability to use it as designed. And games are made to be played, not resold. That's simply a convenience which happens to exist. I firmly believe that yes, if you buy something you should own it. But since when does that overrule someone wanting to control the way their creation is used and maximize the potential rewards for said creation? Ultimately the market will dictate what practices they can or cannot employ to maximize that ROI.

Sorry for typos. Damn phone keyboard.




RE: Oh Internet, I love you
By ascian5 on 7/8/2011 1:13:33 PM , Rating: 2
Also, to the 'just lower your prices' argument.

I guarantee you that these companies spend more on researching elasticity and demand than most of us will ever see in our lifetime. To think that a lower price is the solution is simply incorrect.

Ignoring the million arguments I could make to support that, take the recent steam sales.

Magic was $3.49. LESS THAN A FAST FOOD VALUE MEAL.
People were still commenting they were going to wait for it to get cheaper. Bah.


By MagicSquid on 7/8/2011 10:32:10 AM , Rating: 2
Crap like this makes me glad that my most recent console is a secondhand PS2.




Stupid
By Nnev on 7/8/2011 10:56:46 AM , Rating: 2
So now I can't trade games with a friend and have them enjoy the content? What about the kid with split parents? You can play NHL 11 at Mommys house with your friends but at Daddy's house you have to buy an extra fee...

This has to be targetted at those game rental services that charge a flat fee for renting games.




Hrm...
By Sunagwa on 7/8/2011 12:36:42 PM , Rating: 2
I almost kept my PS3 after the whole hacking thing went down. Then I heard about this and it was the last straw. All this is going to accomplish is to further tarnish there brand. I suppose its a good thing though because Sony obviously doesn't give a crap about there consumers.

The only way this could possibly make sense from a consumer standpoint is if they drastically reduced the initial purchase price of any title that supports this. I'm talking a $60 game goes to $20 and then $5-$10 for an additional play through.

Of course this would help make it fair to the consumer to some degree or another so you can expect it to never happen.

Congratulation's Sony, you just bought one of what I think will be many boycott's for life. Like many have pointed out its the only real power the consumer has and I'm choosing to flex that muscle.




Cars
By Chaosforce on 7/8/2011 6:14:07 PM , Rating: 2
Guess im screwed cause i dont have my fordpass for my car so i can unlock 60+mph since ford didnt get a cut cause i got it new from a different dealer.




vote with your wallet
By porlino87 on 7/10/2011 11:31:51 AM , Rating: 2
This kind of thing will catch on with other companies if it succeeds. How will this affect consumers in the game industry?

I don't like it. If you have to do it, I say lower the prices. Or, offer alternative versions such as "single player only" which is much cheaper

I also dont like the tone of voice from this guy:

Senior Vice President of publisher relations Rob Dyer has said that the company is frustrated with the lack of revenue from used games, and many other Sony executives like Andrew House, head of Sony's PlayStation business, support these new directives. "I am a big believer in encouraging the gamer to have a reason to hold onto [a game] and to continue to play, and for the publisher to be able to see something if there is a second sale, because right now, for years, as a publisher, we saw nothing [from used sales]," said Dyer.

Vote (-1). NO!




dfhgdfgd
By ninainaidbuxing on 7/11/2011 7:20:50 AM , Rating: 2
http://www.ifancyshop.com

I tide fashion Good-looking, not expensive Free transport




vcxvxcz
By tangtangtan on 7/11/2011 10:04:58 AM , Rating: 2
http://www.benzlogo.com/

I tide fashion Good-looking, not expensive Free transport




Where's my $2?
By DarthKaos on 7/11/2011 11:47:00 AM , Rating: 2
So when did the financial expectation of a game change from one sale to multiple sales? Are game companies now building in the expectation that they will receive revenue from the second, third, etc... sale of their games. The know a game will sell for $60 new. They track their R&D. They know their fixed and variable costs. So why are they mad about the sale of used games?

Because they did not think of it first and someone else is making money from a great idea. I can see how it would be frustrating but quit crying and start a more successful used game company or business model entirely. Don't just tack on extra fees.




Sony can without a doubt...
By Freezetron on 7/9/2011 9:29:51 PM , Rating: 1
Go fuck themselves with this bullshit. Seriously, I used to be a huge PSX fan back in the day. But the amount of bullshit they have done the past several years has all but rendered me never to purchase any of their gaming products again.

I'll keep sucking Microsofts teet thank you very much




I don't really care
By Nighteye2 on 7/10/2011 4:37:33 PM , Rating: 1
If getting money from 2nd hand sales helps make more games, I'm all for it - on the condition that whatever they do doesn't hurt those players who buy it new. Like capcom's one-save bullshit, which also hurts players wanting to play through their new game multiple times.




Not as bad
By tdktank59 on 7/8/11, Rating: -1
RE: Not as bad
By tastyratz on 7/8/2011 10:33:50 AM , Rating: 5
This is a slippery slope. Look at the new resident evil for the wii? ONE TIME GAMEPLAY PASS ONLY. That is REDICULOUS. If you beat the game YOU BUY IT AGAIN.

If I pay for a game it is my property, if I want to play it on another console or at a friends house I do not agree to that kind of licensing. If I want to sell my property that is my right, and this devalues my property.
This is just like Sony telling me I can't use my property as I see fit and removing end user rights

I can understand slightly because of the online access but it won't end there. It will become a new activation system except all it will do is trouble the end user. It will be easier to pirate games than buy them just like pc's for awhile. Cracks make many games usable on the pc even if you paid for them, looks like that same trend is moving to consoles - but if you have to crack it to play it and relinquish your capability to play online as a result that removes incentive from many to actually purchase.

Why are people forced to feel and act like criminals to do what feels right with their own property?


RE: Not as bad
By MrBlastman on 7/8/2011 10:50:36 AM , Rating: 2
Here's an idea:

If these developers are so worried about losing sales to used games--just release the games at lower price points. I guarantee that there is a particular point that will allow maximal sell-through. Raise it and sales will drop, lower it and sales will not increase... or it will not be as profitable in the long run.

It is at this point that profits and revenues are maximized. Instead of jacking up the prices to over sixty dollars a game on consoles (I'm a PC gamer so I don't have that problem), try lowering them to make them more attractive. If you increase the number of people buying at first release, you reduce the reliance on used property.

Used property will always exist though. Unless they keep up with these draconian measures that I'm sure will eventually be subject to a court ruling at some point when consumer groups revolt. Who knows what they will rule--but, I believe they will be subjected to one at some point in time.


RE: Not as bad
By Solandri on 7/8/2011 4:03:35 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Used property will always exist though. Unless they keep up with these draconian measures that I'm sure will eventually be subject to a court ruling at some point when consumer groups revolt.

The case for resale of used software has already been winding its way through the courts for a while now. The latest ruling was in the software publisher's favor. It's currently at the preparation step before a full appeal to the Supreme Court of the U.S.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernor_v._Autodesk,_I...

I could see it going either way. Unlike music and movies, software publishers have pretty closely followed the license model for their products. If you lose a copy of the install disk, they'll replace the disk for you for the price of the disk + shipping (provided you can prove you own it). When they come out with a new version, they allow upgrades at a reduced price, reflecting the fact that you've already paid to license many of the features which are in the new version (Not so true for games though).


RE: Not as bad
By MrBlastman on 7/8/2011 4:31:19 PM , Rating: 4
Games I feel are more similar to a book. There are lots of used bookstores, right? I don't see authors up in arms about it either.

This whole stink about game publishers not wanting to allow used software sales is about greed and nothing else.


RE: Not as bad
By MrBlastman on 7/8/2011 4:32:17 PM , Rating: 2
I am curious about how this case turns out I might add. Thanks for the link.


RE: Not as bad
By Taft12 on 7/8/2011 5:17:38 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
software publishers have pretty closely followed the license model for their products.


Not for shrinkwrapped software.

Ever bought software from a store, gotten the installer as far as the EULA, then decide you aren't willing to agree to the terms and tried to return it to the retailer? It doesn't go over well.

The first sale doctrine should apply to anything you have to pay for before getting your eyes on the EULA (even then, what if I never clicked agree, but got my cat to do it for me?)


RE: Not as bad
By sabbede on 7/8/2011 10:55:19 AM , Rating: 3
Well, according to Sony you didn't buy a piece of property, you bought a limited license that you have no right to sell, transfer or really posses in any proper sense. A license for one copy of one type of media.

Its a load of bollocks really.
Personally, I think that if you bought a movie on VHS, you have every right to have it on DVD. If you buy a CD, you have the right to rip it to MP3, download a FLAC...
Hell, if I bought a CD or a game or a movie and then I lost it, I think it more than reasonable that I should be able to grab a torrent of it rather than buy it again.

Sony, as well as all other publishers, disagree. They put it right in the TOS and expect us to read several pages of legalese that support that.
Screw that.


RE: Not as bad
By Solandri on 7/8/2011 3:38:23 PM , Rating: 2
Online games are a bit different though. If the game has a sufficient non-networked content to justify its price, then I don't see a problem with charging people extra to be able to use it online. I see a pretty clear distinction between the game as a product, and the game as a service. Of course I'd prefer online multiplayer service be open so people can set up their own servers if they want, but that's really the game publisher's call. It's their game and if they want to cripple it by requiring Internet access to their service, that's their right.

IMHO a proper analogy for CDs would be that buying the CD lets you listen to it (or the MP3) anytime you want. But if you want to be able to stream the CD to friends over the Internet, you have to pay extra for it.


RE: Not as bad
By nikon133 on 7/10/2011 4:38:29 AM , Rating: 2
Completely agree here. Code is for unlocking online part of the game. Game can be sold or borrowed or given away for offline playing as many times as you want... but for every new online gamer, Sony wants a few bucks.

I'm also finding comparisons with paper books or cars a bit crazy. Different products, different models of consumption, different requirements. Yes you can consume book (or use a car) and sell it. No you cannot use/consume, say, chocolate or loaf of bread and sell it after that. And you cannot apply same rules to everything.

Steam games, you cannot sell, borrow, give away. I don't have problem with that - I still buy Steam games. But how's what Sony is trying to do any worse?


RE: Not as bad
By bah12 on 7/8/2011 12:08:33 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
If I pay for a game it is my property, if I want to play it on another console or at a friends house I do not agree to that kind of licensing.
If I develop a game clearly designed for a one time play, and you buy it knowing that, that is my right as a developer. You don't HAVE to buy it.

BTW I won't ever buy one under that method, but playing devils advocate here no one is forcing you to buy anything.


RE: Not as bad
By Flunk on 7/8/2011 12:22:41 PM , Rating: 3
If you don't like it, don't buy that game. They won't do this anymore if no one buys it. This is exactly like Sony's rootkits on their CDs, they stopped doing it because it was so unpopular.


RE: Not as bad
By Hiawa23 on 7/8/2011 6:30:24 PM , Rating: 2
I don't worry about the codes as I buy most of my games from Gamefly, & they send the codes with the manual when you buy the game. Not really an issue. I am certainly not paying Sony anything for online, as I don't like the way PSN is setup, & i primarily use my PS3 as a SP console & movie Bluray player, & only buy exclusive games for it anyways.


RE: Not as bad
By Milliniar on 7/8/2011 1:13:16 PM , Rating: 2
If this is the same as any other companies online pass, and plenty of games have em on PSN, then you can play online on any ps3 that your account is active on. which i believe is like 3 at a time. To get the access on the other machine you just have to go to your download history and download it.
Through this same method you can share all your PSN downloads, this method has worked in the past for games like UFC 2010 and Dead space 2, as well as codes for pre-orders or "one time use" DLC included in new copies.


"Game reviewers fought each other to write the most glowing coverage possible for the powerhouse Sony, MS systems. Reviewers flipped coins to see who would review the Nintendo Wii. The losers got stuck with the job." -- Andy Marken














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