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  (Source: 20somethingfinance.com)
Those in support of the legislation say they have the 60 votes needed

Recent reports say a vote on legislation regarding the collection of online sales taxes could come as early as next week. 

This new legislation would allow U.S. states to collect online sales taxes from Internet retailers -- as long as these retailers have physical stores or affiliates within their borders.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid filed a motion in support of the new legislation on Thursday, and now, the Senate is expected to vote next Monday on whether or not to move ahead with it. Some say they've achieved the 60 votes needed to move forward.

While this still gives many online-only retailers a huge advantage, it would still be a win for brick-and-mortar stores like Wal-Mart and Best Buy.

The brick-and-mortars have complained that online-only stores have received an unfair advantage by not having to collect sales tax because it attracts customers to the lower prices. Customers are then supposed to self-report these taxes to the state, but this rarely happens -- and states would love to get their hands on the money that comes from Internet sales taxes.

For instance, the California Board of Equalization said it made $96.4 million in sales tax on internet commerce from September-December 2012, which is the first full quarter that the state started collecting.

Amazon is one of the main online retailers with a target on its back when it comes to online sales taxes. It has been fighting U.S. states that force it to collect sales tax for years (except in Kansas, Kentucky, New York, North Dakota and Washington). The e-tailer fled many states that attempted to force tax collection on the company, such as California and Illinois.

But eventually, Amazon finally broke down and started collecting sales tax in certain states, which allowed it to build more distribution centers within those states. For instance, Amazon announced that it would collect sales tax in New Jersey last May so that two Amazon distribution centers could be built. This led to faster shipping for customers, such as Amazon's same-day delivery program, making it more competitive than ever.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos said many times that his company would agree to collect taxes if there were some sort of federal legislation.

Source: Reuters



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Wow the only good thing about buying online
By BRB29 on 4/19/2013 11:14:09 AM , Rating: 2
Now they're taking it away. Some states already charged taxes. The no tax on online purchases actually stimulated the economy. Businesses can sell their goods cheaper and have more exposures so staying in the black is much easier. You also don't need to be in the most visible place or a big marketing fund.

We have to pay shipping instead of tax. If people have to pay taxes and shipping then there's no point in buying online. I would rather pay a little bit more and have it instantly in my hands.

Also, this will affect a lot of industries negatively.

At a time like this, the government should really not be limiting economic growth.




RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Motoman on 4/19/2013 11:25:56 AM , Rating: 3
Nope.

As pointed out an infinite number of times, if your state had sales tax you were always required to pay use tax anyway. It's just that no one did.

This legislation is a function of the fact that the states can't figure out how to enforce use taxes.

But either way, you're categorically wrong about the collection of tax at the point of online sale making any difference.

The base cost of the product is still vastly cheaper. You can buy an HDMI cable at Best Buy for $30, or for $2 at Monoprice.com. If you have to pay the same amount of tax on either of those purchases, the online purchase still wins.

The online selection is still essentially infinite, as opposed to the inventory and selection any brick & mortar store can provide.

The convenience of shopping online vs. in a B&M store is still essentially infinitely better.

The cost of driving to & from a B&M store still figures in too.

Shipping is frequently free with many online vendors. And in the cases where it isn't, if the sum total of all the "pros" in favor of the online purchase weren't better than the "cons" of getting the item at a B&M store, you wouldn't have been buying the item online in the first place. Collecting the *same* tax online as you have to pay at a B&M doesn't change that function.

To all people who assert that they'll stop shopping online if they have to pay tax at that point of sale, I say this: you're a liar.

All of the "pros" for online vastly outweigh the "cons." With or without point-of-online-sale tax collection.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By BRB29 on 4/19/2013 11:48:29 AM , Rating: 1
ok I think you got this backwards.

If you are the fool that pays $30 for a hdmi cable at Best Buy then you will always be a fool. There's plenty of stores that will sell for less. I bought mine at Microcenter for $4. No amount of online stores offering cheap goods will save a dumb person from overpaying. Your argument is not sound.

Free shipping is not free. Shipping is cheap overall because big online retailers have big shipping contracts to reduce costs. That cost is passed onto you in one form or another. They're in a business to make money, not give you free goods and services. Google gives you Android for free but they get that money back from their app store and ads.

Currently online shopping is marginally better, not infinite. How do you even come up with infinitely better?
Have you ever have to RMA or wait forever for a product because something messed up?
Have you ever gotten products that are DOA, wrong size, wrong products, etc...

Nothing beats a brick a mortar store for shopping. The only bad thing is that it costs more and taxes. I personally like to look at, touch, feel and handle the products before I buy it. I know the majority of people share the same mentality. Pictures and description can never be good enough.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Motoman on 4/19/2013 12:03:21 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
No amount of online stores offering cheap goods will save a dumb person from overpaying. Your argument is not sound.


People know that online products are cheaper than B&M. That's a big draw. Maybe they don't find the cheapest possible price, but they do better than the B&M stores they have access too. If you don't happen to live within driving distance of a Micro Center (there aren't very many of them), then what? Just pay the $30 at BBY because that's the store you *do* have access to? Or maybe do you tell that person to get it for $4 from the Micro Center website? The argument is 100% sound.

quote:
Free shipping is not free. Shipping is cheap overall because big online retailers have big shipping contracts to reduce costs. That cost is passed onto you in one form or another.


This is true. However, it's clear that the overall cost is still *vastly* cheaper than B&M. So however the cost of the "free" shipping is being recouped, in the end it doesn't matter.

quote:
Currently online shopping is marginally better, not infinite. How do you even come up with infinitely better?


1. Essentially infinite selection.
2. If it exists, it's in stock...somewhere.
3. Vastly better prices.
4. Essentially infinitely better convenience...look at all the ways and places I can be to do online shopping. As opposed to transporting myself to a B&M location.
5. No costs, either in time, fuel, whatever to accomplish said transport of myself to a B&M store.
6. Vastly better customer service...in all ways. I'll elaborate...

quote:
Have you ever have to RMA or wait forever for a product because something messed up?

Sure, I've RMAd lots of stuff. It's a lot easier, and more convenient, than driving back to BBY and then having to argue with some dipsh1t at the "customer service" counter about being able to return the item. And a lot of online vendors, like Amazon, will just give you a UPS label to stick on the box and ship it back. The returns process with online vendors is, essentially, infinitely better than with B&M.

Another benefit of customer service with an online vendor...they know who I am. And they know how much business I give them. If I were to contact Newegg for example, the customer service rep would instantly see in my account that I buy *LOTS* of stuff from them on a very regular basis, which clearly points out to them that I'm a very important and loyal customer. If, on the other hand, I actually bought the same amount of stuff from, say, BBY...they have no idea of that at the customer service counter. They have no way to even find out, and in the end they really don't care.

quote:
Have you ever gotten products that are DOA, wrong size, wrong products, etc...


Sure. WAY easier to deal with that with an online vendor than a B&M. Really, I don't have to leave my house for that either - just like I didn't have to leave my house to buy it in the first place.

quote:
Nothing beats a brick a mortar store for shopping.


You're very alone in that opinion. It's your opinion, so that's fine...but if it was widely held, people wouldn't have shifted wholesale to online shopping the way that they have. And of course, there's the phenomenon of people "showrooming" in BBY et al. For those who just have to put their hands on something first...I'm not one of them.

B&M stores simply *can't* ever truly compete with online vendors on price - there's obviously so much more overhead for B&M that online vendors don't have. So once again, the collection or not of tax at the point of online sale isn't going to make any difference. All of the pros still vastly outweigh the cons.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By BRB29 on 4/19/2013 1:24:17 PM , Rating: 1
There's more stores than Microcenter and Best Buy. Do I have to list them all? it's different everywhere. But you're dumb if you overpay since almost every store has a website.

There's pros and cons in both methods of shopping. Prices are a lot more competitive now. Physical stores are generally slightly more expensive.

I can't believe you're complaining about going to a store. Maybe you're a home body and you like to be lazy. But going to a store is no different than going to a restaurant, the gym, or work. It's not hard, try moving around sometimes and shed a few pounds.

I don't think anyone can ever argue that RMA is more convenient than showing up at customer service and getting a replacement immediately.

I don't think anyone will ever argue that driving to a local store and picking something up right away is much better than waiting for days if prices are the same.

I don't think anyone will ever argue that going through an automated answering system, talking to people that barely speaks english, etc... is better than showing up to a store to show and communicate exactly what you mean. Not to mention you also have to pay for at least one way shipping for online stores.

I don't think anyone will ever argue that Best Buy is a horrible example because they are set up like a freaking car dealership and rarely have any good deals. Only older people or people who have no clues about electronics go to Best Buy. Their cell phone deals are good though. Stop using Best Buy as an example to prove your point. They're the only one still using pressure sales tactics selling electronics.

Microcenter has a customer account just like newegg. Plenty of stores have it. Even groceries stores have it now.

You just sound like someone who doesn't like to move around.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Motoman on 4/19/13, Rating: 0
RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By BRB29 on 4/19/2013 2:46:41 PM , Rating: 2
I'll keep shopping wherever the good deals are regardless of online or in store :)

You keep using Best Buy to talk down to stores. I dare you to find another place where I can buy $189 for i53570k and $229 or i7 3770k as their regular price. Until then, I suggest you open your mind and get out of the cave.


By Motoman on 4/19/2013 6:15:37 PM , Rating: 1
The degree to which you don't get this is staggering. OK, I know I said I was done, but seriously...

Micro Center has 23 stores. Nationwide.

The reason I was using BBY is because they're *everywhere* - there's something like 1,100 of them.

If you happen to live close to a Micro Center, then by all means, trot down there and buy your sh1t. But you do realize that for the *vast* majority of Americans, there's no Micro Center in sight, yes? On the other hand, what IS likely to be near by? A Best Buy. Or for that matter, an Office Max, or Staples, or maybe a Radio Shack...perhaps a Walmart is the only thing some people have reasonable access to.

But you know what those people can do who *don't* live anywhere near one of the vanishingly-small number of Micro Center locations? They could - GASP - order from their website!

Yay!

Dare fail. Get a clue.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By V-Money on 4/19/2013 8:24:21 PM , Rating: 2
I'm going to have to come in and defend Motoman's argument since your view of the world seems to be vastly limited. First off, there are some places (many in fact) where there aren't that many options for retailers. If you live in the big city then sure, you have plenty of options, but not everyone does. There are lots of places where there is only one "store" locally (which usually jacks up the price) and you have to drive a distance to get to either a Walmart/Best Buy/etc. and you don't have really any other practical options. You may have to pay for shipping online but as it turns out gas isn't free these days. Also, the laziness argument doesn't really apply because if you are having to go that far of a distance than you would be driving anyways which isn't a form of exercise last time I checked.

Furthermore, for some people like me I happen to be living ~10 miles from DC. There are a lot of options around me, but I still buy a lot of stuff from Amazon. The reason is because I am taking 18 credit hours of schooling and working full time. Before this I was in the Navy on submarines and was frequently working 100+ hour weeks. I can't justify going somewhere that may or may not have what I'm looking for an price that may or may not be better when I am guaranteed to find exactly what I want online. With Amazon I have a prime account so I get free 2 day shipping or overnight for 3.99, I personally don't need anything faster than that.

The prices are usually comparable if not better and I am guaranteed a great experience. I have ordered hundreds of items from amazon (I've averaged about 2/day for years straight, now that I'm out of of the Navy that's gone down dramatically) and I've only had to send back one item because I got the wrong size earbuds. In short, that may work well for you and congratu-@&$*ing-lations to you for that, but not everyone is in the same position or need the same things.


By Reclaimer77 on 4/20/2013 2:02:00 PM , Rating: 3
It doesn't matter how well Motoman rationalizes his position. The simple fact is this tax is wholly Unconstitutional and always has been. This, at it's core, is a nationally mandated Internet tax on businesses. That's entirely beyond the realm of the Constitutional restraints on Congress.

Also this bill is a complete fracking mess, and causes SO many issues it's not even funny. For no clear gain. It also brings up alarming, honestly alarming, privacy concerns by making your Internet purchases essentially a matter of public record.

This will hurt innovation and drive more people away from domestic retailers. When will people understand? When you raise taxes, there's ALWAYS a net loss in revenues.

Also this is yet another crippling burden placed on small businesses, which suffer a disproportionate amount compared to large companies when it comes to tax compliance costs. There are already nearly 10,000 state, local and municipal tax jurisdictions to navigate nationwide.

Just complying with a single state's tax laws costs small businesses disproportionately more than larger firms that can afford accounting and technology teams to help them work through these arcane laws. A 2006 PricewaterhouseCoopers study found that tax-compliance costs for small businesses (those having $1 million to $10 million in annual sales) are nearly 2.5 times greater than those of larger firms. For businesses under $1 million in sales, those costs explode to 16 cents on every dollar of revenue.

This Government is literally squeezing and spending the lifeblood out of this country. We're bankrupt, quite literally, and these guys are acting like smack-addicts who are looking for a quick fix! It's time for rehab.


By DiscoWade on 4/19/2013 1:25:44 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Nothing beats a brick a mortar store for shopping.


I used to think that buying a TV or computer in a B&M was the way to go in case you had to return the item because it was damaged. My opinion about that changed when my dad bought a HDTV from Best Buy and when he got it home he found out the screen was cracked. So he went back the next day and showed them the cracked screen. Their answer: "How do we know you didn't crack it?"

After much persistence this Best Buy did agree to ship it off to see if it could be repaired. Surprise surprise, "Geek Squad" wouldn't repair it. So while it was being shipped back, they called Samsung and Best Buy corporate. Best Buy corporate said to take it to a different Best Buy and exchange it. Which my dad did, and that Best Buy exchanged it with no fuss at all. To this day I'm convinced my local Best Buy closed because their customer service was too good.

Since then I have heard two different people complain about the customer service at that bad Best Buy. One said that he saw the manager yell at the employee who gave him a military discount.

I no longer believe shopping at the B&M is a better for any item. Taking a chance on good customer service is not what I want to experience.

If you still think shopping at B&M's is better, read this link:
http://consumerist.com/2013/04/16/former-frys-empl...


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By DanNeely on 4/19/2013 12:06:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
As pointed out an infinite number of times, if your state had sales tax you were always required to pay use tax anyway. It's just that no one did.


For the last two years PA has moved the use tax query onto the income tax form instead of keeping it separate and allowing 99% of tax payers to claim willful ignorance.

Instead everyone has to either explicitly state "I didn't buy anything online that I didn't pay sales tax on at the time", "I want to itemize all my online purchases", or "I want to claim the standard estimated amount of no tax collected online purchases, and only itemize items over $1000(?)".

Unfortunately I haven't been able to find any information about how well this worked last year.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Motoman on 4/19/2013 12:34:08 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah that was probably a good move on their part.

Although, I have a feeling it probably didn't make any difference. The problem would be what the state would have to go through, on a person-by-person basis, to prove what you did and didn't buy out-of-state that year and failed to pay use tax on.

It's like when a state (maybe Virginia? Can't remember for sure.) wanted Amazon to turn over sales data for all it's citizens. Amazon basically said eff joo. Get a warrant, or GTFO.

Because that's basically what it would boil down to. The state would have to get a judge to see that there was just cause for issuing a warrant for online purchase information for every citizen in the state, from every (well, every major) online vendor. And then the state would have to invest the time and money in manpower to investigate all that BS.

Just isn't going to happen. People don't pay use taxes because there's essentially zero chance the state is actually going to follow up on it.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By DanNeely on 4/19/2013 1:14:47 PM , Rating: 2
While I wouldn't be surprised if there still are a lot of people falsely claiming they either didn't buy anything online or everything they bought online had taxes collected at the time (with Amazon collecting PA tax that's within the realm of the possible for some people) I'd be shocked if there isn't also a large group of people for whom the income-based non-itemized estimate ($10-30) is a small enough amount of money that the risk of being audited and hit with fines sand punitive interest on the non-paid part are high enough that the risk/reward for lying isn't worth it.


By BRB29 on 4/19/2013 1:26:42 PM , Rating: 3
How many prostitutes actually claim their full income?
How many waiter/waitresses/bartender/etc... actually claim all their tips?
How many people actually claim the money they make doing small jobs for cash.


By bsd228 on 4/19/2013 3:08:26 PM , Rating: 2
> It's like when a state (maybe Virginia? Can't remember for sure.) wanted Amazon to turn over sales data for all it's citizens. Amazon basically said eff joo. Get a warrant, or GTFO.

> Just isn't going to happen. People don't pay use taxes because there's essentially zero chance the state is actually going to follow up on it.

I wouldn't be so confident. My grandmother bought her smokes from Indian reservation (mail order) for years to avoid all of the excise taxes and then got a nice bill from the state. Seems like the tribe rolled over and released their records.

Amazon would exhaust every avenue possible to avoid this...the customer backlash would be tremendous even if it is objectively not their fault. But that "essentially zero" chance is probably somewhat bigger than that.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By spamreader1 on 4/19/2013 2:54:44 PM , Rating: 2
Most states "use tax" lays the burden on the consumer, not on the retailer. If I cross state lines and purchase goods at even a Wal-Mart. I'm supposed to send the 8.25% tax on the taxable goods to my own county, even though I paid tax at the store in the other state. Obviously nobody does this in reality, because it's absurd. If I purchase goods from online stores, I'm the one who's supposed to be responsible to pay my local taxes, not the online store collect them on my behalf.


By Solandri on 4/19/2013 6:51:38 PM , Rating: 2
That's what's so silly about all this. The states have it within their power right now to eliminate the "advantage" that online retailers have, without violating the U.S. Constitution.

Simply eliminate their sales tax. Re-implement it as a higher income tax, and allow deductions for things that used to be sales tax-free (e.g. food, deposits into savings, etc). It accomplishes exactly the same thing as a use tax, except the burden would be on the taxpayer to prove that his deductions are legit. Not on the state to prove you bought a laptop via mail order.

I don't understand government's desire to complicate our and and their lives with dozens of different taxes, when you could consolidate nearly all of them into just a few taxes. In the end it's the same thing - I send some of my money to the government. Who care where or when it happens, as long as the total amount per year is the same.


By xcergy on 4/19/2013 3:52:39 PM , Rating: 2
> This legislation is a function of the fact that the states can't figure out how to enforce use taxes.

It's more like States have refused to even try. No, new, bad law is always the answer. Read any article posted on the subject: "Most are not aware that such law (Use Tax) exists. DUH!!!! Who's fault is that? How hard is it to advertise, or solicit the use of tax preparers, or even utilize law enforcement for a few well publicized enforcement actions? No, better to penalize business to become a tax collector where costs approach 15% for each tax dollar collected.


By laststop311 on 4/20/2013 5:50:21 AM , Rating: 2
So you are for paying more money? Why on earth would you want to pay more money?


By Reclaimer77 on 4/20/2013 8:19:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
This legislation is a function of the fact that the states can't figure out how to enforce use taxes.


Well that's just shockingly bad logic not to mention entirely wrong and illegal.

The Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, (passed in 1791), was intended to limit the powers granted Congress in Article I. It reads;

"The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people."

The Tenth Amendment means that Congress cannot force a state to pass any regulations or legislation. In other words, they cannot mandate that states collect sales tax on Internet purchases.

Get this through your head Motoman, for the 10'th time I've had to defeat you on this, you are WRONG.

This proposed bill is entirely, undeniably, and altogether obviously Unconstitutional. No matter how much you might agree with it.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Ammohunt on 4/19/2013 11:30:56 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
At a time like this, the government should really not be limiting economic growth.


Seems like that all they are out to do with recent legislation like the Health care act, new taxes around every corner and ideas such as raising the minimum wage. They just love to kill businesses.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By BRB29 on 4/19/2013 11:32:46 AM , Rating: 2
And sequestration lol. That didn't make any sense at all. Nevermind the lost productivity, there's a huge amount of local businesses that is indirectly affected.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Ammohunt on 4/19/2013 12:26:21 PM , Rating: 2
Honestly if i were a small business owner with some decent equity i would sellout and retire somewhere warm. Its not worth working 16 hour days 7 days a week just to have the government bend you over the fence.

In Colorado the democrats have put forth a bill that would allow discrimination lawsuits against businesses with less than 15 employees. On the surface it sounds like a good idea but truth is small companies can't afford lawsuits like that justified or not. All that happens is that they just fold up and everyone gets fired. In a society where everyone is just waiting to be offended in some way just so they can suit and get paid, it exponentially compounds the economic problems. Not to mention the new businesses unwillingness to move to this state because of wacky laws like this.

Why would any sane person start a business in today's day and age?


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Rukkian on 4/19/2013 2:08:06 PM , Rating: 1
While I see that it may be detrimental if a lawsuit comes along, I can't believe you would think it would be bad for people to get in trouble for sexual harassment just because it is a small company. If they are following appropriate proceedures and not doing anything wrong, insurance would not be that expensive. I would bet that most already have some sort of lawsuit insurance which may cover it, or at worse they would need a ryder for this.


By Ammohunt on 4/19/2013 3:30:08 PM , Rating: 2
small businesses have very tight margins i doubt any small business could afford to carry such insurance.


By inperfectdarkness on 4/19/2013 11:42:26 AM , Rating: 2
Commiefornia has the highest state sales-tax in the nation. No wonder they're pitching a fit. Even still, raising it to 15% and taxing everyone online still wouldn't balance the budget there.

I'm not against collecting sales tax for online sales, but I also believe that it should be collected ONLY for the state in which the seller resides/does business. Thus, states with low (or non-existent) sales tax are a more attractive option for companies to set up business.


By BRB29 on 4/19/2013 11:50:14 AM , Rating: 2
Like wyoming and alaska?


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By ewhite06 on 4/19/2013 12:09:12 PM , Rating: 2
We all knew this was going to happen. It was just when. Now we just need to see how badly this gets screwed up. I just hope they figure out a way to get the all the states to agree to a flat tax rate. 5% is perfect. That way all the states collect some revenue, people still get a deal going online and its much easier for the online retailer to collect, record and pay out those taxes. Not everyone has the manpower/resources of an Amazon. But I'm sure those states with much higher state sales tax (looking at you Illinois, New York and California) will complain "But our sales tax is 10% - we're getting cheated!" Well, you're collecting essentially 0% now - which do you prefer?


By DanNeely on 4/19/2013 1:30:37 PM , Rating: 2
A single flat rate isn't going to happen. There's too much spread between what levels of service various state govts provide their citizens for a one size fit all rate to work. Doing an zip code based lookup of the proper rate instead of a per state lookup or constant value isn't a major technical problem.

The challenge for implementation is figuring out what is/isn't taxable when you've got dozens of different (and complex) sets of regulations defining it. Fortunately(?) a number of state govts have realized that this is the real sticking plan in trying to collect online. A few months ago I read an article in the local paper (can't find online) that about 2 dozen states were working together to define a common set of what isn't taxable.

Locally governor Corbett has promised that if implemented the change would be done in a revenue neutral way (for non cheats anyway) by lowering the rate enough to compensate for the broader base. With the PA Legislature a fully owned subsidiary of the (rabidly anti-tax) state Republican party I suspect if they err it will be on the side of lower net revenue.


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By Reclaimer77 on 4/19/2013 7:59:29 PM , Rating: 2
Yup the legacy of the Obama Administration: Reckless spending, Big-government on an unparalleled level, more taxation.

Did I leave anything out?


RE: Wow the only good thing about buying online
By MadMan007 on 4/20/2013 9:14:13 AM , Rating: 2
You left this out: tons of butthurt Obama haters.


By ianweck on 4/20/2013 11:05:53 AM , Rating: 2
Also tons of mindless Obama apologists. He's "The One" my ass.


I don't get this
By corduroygt on 4/19/2013 12:11:04 PM , Rating: 2
You already get charged Sales Tax if you buy stuff on the internet from a company that has a presence in your state, so what's different with this law?




RE: I don't get this
By bsd228 on 4/19/2013 3:09:58 PM , Rating: 2
> You already get charged Sales Tax if you buy stuff on the internet from a company that has a presence in your state, so what's different with this law?

yeah, I have the same question. it does seem identical to the status quo.


Unconstitutional
By TechGOAT on 4/19/2013 10:37:22 PM , Rating: 2
I guess all those people sworn to defend the Constitution never read it. Aritcle 1, Section 7: "All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives." I already lost track of how many times the Senate has violated this in the last few years.




RE: Unconstitutional
By timothyd97402 on 4/20/2013 6:00:07 PM , Rating: 2
The House & the Senate just shuffle the paperwork around to satisfy such trifling little Constitutional provisions. You only thought that tax / spending bill originated in the Senate.


Abandon ship!
By PadaV4 on 4/19/2013 7:32:28 PM , Rating: 2
I can see e-businesses moving out of usa.. Since they cant be taxed if they have no physical presence in the USA? And those who stay. will be at a disadvantage. /fail




Make it fair for everyone
By Chaser on 4/22/2013 2:35:45 PM , Rating: 2
B&M businesses invest in local communities by hiring employees, sharing in tax payments, and offering you a showroom where you can walk in at your convenience, look, handle, and compare the merchandise. Running a local business, staffing, supplying, and managing nation-wide is not cake walk. Wages and bills, operating costs have to be paid. There's risk as well.

They can't compete against a semi-automated warehouse operating out of rural Kentucky, with instant replacement employees lining out the doors as it is.

Sp I like local businesses and try to support them at every opportunity it's viable.

The idea of more tax revenues I am sure has some politicians drueling.




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