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Print 13 comment(s) - last by KOOLTIME.. on Dec 19 at 5:02 PM


  (Source: security-faqs.com)
He was also ordered to pay $650,000 in forfeiture

A Swedish man was sentenced to four years in prison after pleading guilty to selling rogue antivirus software in an international cybercrime ring.

Mikael Patrick Sallnert, 37, was sentenced by Chief U.S. District Judge Marsha J. Pechman in the Western District of Washington. He received a four-year prison sentence and was ordered to pay $650,000 in forfeiture.

Sallnert was a credit card processor in an international cybercrime ring. He sold rogue antivirus software, or "scareware," which advertises that it will protect a user's computer from viruses, but instead does the opposite.

About 960,000 people were affected, and the cybercrime ring netted about $71 million from the scheme.

Sallnert was arrested in Denmark in January 2012 and extradited to the United States in March. He plead guilty in August to one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and one count of accessing a protected computer in furtherance of fraud.

“Mikael Patrick Sallnert played an instrumental role in carrying out a massive cybercrime ring that victimized approximately 960,000 innocent victims,” said Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer.  “By facilitating payment processing, Sallnert allowed the cybercrime ring to collect millions of dollars from victims who were duped into believing their computers were compromised and could be fixed by the bogus software created by Sallnert’s co-conspirators.  Cybercrime poses a real threat to American consumers and businesses, and the Justice Department is committed to pursuing cybercriminals across the globe.”

Earlier this year, Symantec was sued for allegedly selling scareware. James Gross from Washington State filed the suit against Symantec in a court in the Northern District of California, hoping that it will turn into a class action covering anyone that has purchased Symantec software. Gross alleges that the firms Registry Mechanic software installed on his computer told him that it had found multiple errors with his machined and after paying the $29.95 for the software, he alleges it did nothing.

Source: U.S. Department of Justice



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About f**king time
By Totally on 12/17/2012 5:28:34 PM , Rating: 4
Stupid adverts so damn annoying.




RE: About f**king time
By sixteenornumber on 12/17/2012 5:58:00 PM , Rating: 2
+1

I really hope to see more of this kind of thing in other countries.


RE: About f**king time
By headbox on 12/17/2012 6:41:47 PM , Rating: 2
but if his fine is 650k for making 71 mil, this will keep happening. He'll do less than two years, then have 70 mil waiting for him.


RE: About f**king time
By vol7ron on 12/17/2012 6:56:15 PM , Rating: 3
I'm not sure he made the $71M, but I think 4 years is a little weak, even if he did plea bargain.

I mean that's only 2.2 minutes for every victim and he is sure to have caused hours of grief and frustration, regardless if you fell for the scareware or not.


RE: About f**king time
By marvdmartian on 12/18/2012 8:15:01 AM , Rating: 4
Seriously. Meanwhile, the guy who hacked ScarJo's phone, and released nude photos of her to the public, gets 10 years in prison?

http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=29443

Seems a little bit of skewed justice, IMHO.


RE: About f**king time
By Trisped on 12/18/2012 5:33:54 PM , Rating: 2
He was part of a crime ring, the ring received 71 Million from his actions, his cut was probably something close to his fines.

Of course the fines might be legal limited.


RE: About f**king time
By fic2 on 12/18/2012 12:03:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
said Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer. “By facilitating payment processing, Sallnert allowed the cybercrime ring to collect millions of dollars from victims who were duped into believing their computers were compromised and could be fixed by the bogus software created by Sallnert’s co-conspirators. Cybercrime poses a real threat to American consumers and businesses, and the Justice Department is committed to pursuing cybercriminals across the globe.”


I agree about the adverts. Since this guy was sentenced to 4 years for helping to dupe computer users when is CNBC going to be charged since they constantly show commercials for this crap?


co-conspirators
By MadMan007 on 12/17/2012 6:29:04 PM , Rating: 4
I certainly hope the co-conspirators get prosecuted as well. This guy was important to the scheme but his role could have been done by anyone. The software writers are the ones that need some serious fines and prison time.




What a joke
By Beenthere on 12/17/2012 7:01:34 PM , Rating: 1
They net $71 million and FUBAR almost a million PCs and all he gets is a $650,000 fine and four years in prison. Hell for $10 Million, a lot of folks would be willing to do four years in the slammer. I say hang him by his thumbs for a couple months and let nature take it's course.




RE: What a joke
By Ryestag on 12/17/2012 7:14:34 PM , Rating: 2
I was thinking the exact same thing. $71 million for 4 years in a minimal security prison and a $640 000 fine ... hilarious.


RE: What a joke
By jeepga on 12/18/2012 8:41:02 AM , Rating: 1
I don't know why you were downvoted, but I agree. You have someone who did damage to countless people and absconded with $10M versus someone who hacked and personally embarrassed and violated the privacy of a celebrity. The result 4 years and 10 years respectively. There's something wrong with this picture.


Two things to say:
By bill.rookard on 12/17/2012 6:09:04 PM , Rating: 2
1) Agree with all the above posters. About frakkin time.
2) Having had to remove some of those scareware/malware variants: NOT. LONG. ENOUGH.




They need to get the rest of em
By KOOLTIME on 12/19/2012 5:02:08 PM , Rating: 2
This guy was just the money launderer, not the spammer putting out the malicious web site scare-ware effects, those folks are not on the hook yet, im sure they are being watched close now though.

4 years for money laundering is basically what he got.

Dont need any anti virus or other garbage-ware to clean or fix a PC.

Just common sense on what you click on while on the internet is all it actually takes.




"We are going to continue to work with them to make sure they understand the reality of the Internet.  A lot of these people don't have Ph.Ds, and they don't have a degree in computer science." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis

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