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Print 12 comment(s) - last by selena.. on Jul 2 at 2:51 AM

TecTiles will be available through the four major U.S. carriers Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile

Samsung introduced a new near field communications (NFC) accessory this week that packs a lot of punch into one tiny sticker.

The stickers, called TecTiles, are coupled with NFC-enabled phones and prompt several different actions with a simple tap. More specifically, the TecTiles have built-in NFC chips that are programmed to launch a number of commands, such as sending text messages, changing phone settings, sharing contact information and launching apps.

Near field communication, or NFC technology, is a set of short-range, wireless technologies that allows mobile devices to interact with specialized readers in order to make everyday payments

Samsung plans on releasing TecTiles for its own NFC-enabled smartphones, including the Galaxy Nexus, the Galaxy S II, the Nexus S 4G, the Galaxy S Blaze 4G and the Galaxy S III.

"With millions of NFC-enabled Samsung Galaxy smartphones currently in the market and the arrival of our flagship device Galaxy S III, Samsung saw an opportunity to expand the value of NFC beyond mobile payments," said Dale Sohn, president of Samsung Telecommunications America. "The launch of Samsung TecTiles is another example of Samsung's ability to innovate new products and applications that improve the way we use our mobile devices for everyday tasks."

Some of these everyday tasks include setting a phone to silent, joining a Wi-Fi network, make a phone call, show an address on a map, check in on Foursquare, "Like" something on Facebook, tweet on Twitter and open up a specific website. A simple tap of your phone can accomplish this.

The TecTiles can be programmed up to 100,000 times using a free Android app called Samsung TecTiles. The TecTiles will be sold for $15 for a pack of five, and will be available through the four major U.S. carriers Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile.

Samsung's heightened commitment to NFC technology is likely due to its upcoming venture with Visa, where the two will join forces for the London 2012 Olympics. The two will offer a NFC mobile payment service via the Olympics and Paralympics Games mobile handset, which will utilize Visa's payment application.

Source: Samsung



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Could be useful
By hankw on 6/14/2012 12:13:36 PM , Rating: 1
This could be pretty useful. For example you can place one on your desk or nightstand and have it go into some kind of do no disturb mode when you don't want to be distracted. Brings a lot of convenience for people too lazy to make extra taps on the screen :p.




RE: Could be useful
By Trisped on 6/14/2012 6:04:14 PM , Rating: 2
I think it would be worth it just to know I can join a device to my wireless network without having to type all 64 random characters of the network security code.

There are other good uses too, like transmitting your business card, giving shoppers a link to more information on your product or service, and unlocking app features (like a promotion card for a free upgrade in a game).


RE: Could be useful
By testerguy on 6/15/2012 1:49:25 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I think it would be worth it just to know I can join a device to my wireless network without having to type all 64 random characters of the network security code.


Why can't you do this already?


Nice, BUT, . . .
By That Takes the Cake on 6/14/2012 2:14:27 PM , Rating: 2
I presume that each new Samsung phone will come with a package of these as samples. That would be the best way to seed the market and get people wanting them, if the price were much lower.

The price mentioned is about 10 times what they should be.




RE: Nice, BUT, . . .
By BillyBatson on 6/14/2012 2:19:30 PM , Rating: 2
At $3 each during launch this might represent the highest price they will be sold at and I would be more than willing to buy 10-15 or these at that price. It's that a ridiculous price where you can't spare $15 just to try it out even it ends up being useless I wouldn't feel bad just throwing them away.


RE: Nice, BUT, . . .
By ferg1 on 6/14/2012 5:45:40 PM , Rating: 2
I'd like to know if these will be restricted to Samsung phones or if all NFC capable Android devices will work.
quote:
Samsung plans on releasing TecTiles for its own NFC-enabled smartphones
could possibly contradict the title
quote:
Samsung Unveils "TecTiles" for NFC-Enabled Smartphones


hmm...
By Quadrillity on 6/14/2012 6:15:01 PM , Rating: 2
There is a Test-TecTile joke in here somewhere...




RE: hmm...
By ratbert1 on 6/14/2012 7:03:35 PM , Rating: 2
Umm, I think that was it.


Queue Apple's lawyers
By bbomb on 6/14/2012 7:54:50 PM , Rating: 2
So how long til Apple claims they own the patent on this too?




By alibhai on 6/15/2012 5:38:33 PM , Rating: 2
Among technology's previous generation of Next Big Things, we heard a lot of talk about the potential of NFC (Near-Field Communication). Smartphone manufacturers were excited enough to start putting NFC on over 40 production models in 2011 alone -- despite the fact that there were very few real-world applications. Google tried to jump-start NFC with an ambitious Google Wallet project, and Samsung's recently unveiled TecTiles hopes to make app-loving users excited about the possibilities.

First, the basics. NFC is a form of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) that operates in an extremely short range. NFC devices need to be (almost) close enough to touch, which reduces but does not eliminate external interference -- intentional, or otherwise. Unlike the similar Bluetooth specification, the NFC connection does not require pairing; any two devices can make a connection.
NFC has an 'effective' range of 10 centimeters; in other words, you need to get a pair of NFC devices (smart or dumb) within the 10 cm range (roughly 4 inches apart) to establish a connection.

source http://su.pr/29pq0Q




By selena on 7/2/2012 2:51:46 AM , Rating: 2
Using NFC tags, the Galaxy S III can quickly and easily run apps, change settings, or perform a plethora of other actions with a simple tap. If you’ve heard of an app called Tasker, it essentially performs the same process but with location based functionality.More about What are Samsung’s NFC TecTiles for the Samsung Galaxy and what do they do? here
http://www.careace.net/2012/06/14/what-samsungs-te...




Works with any tag
By juancferrer on 6/15/2012 2:29:14 AM , Rating: 1
I just downloaded the samsung app. It's working with the Mifare tags I already have. Got 10 of them for around $8. The app is just a shittier version of NFC Task Launcher in the play store...but it's free.




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