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Wave 3  (Source: samsungtomorrow.com)

Wave M  (Source: samsungtomorrow.com)

Wave Y  (Source: samsungtomorrow.com)
Samsung will show off the Wave 3, Wave M and Wave Y at IFA 2011 in Berlin next month

The Android operating system may be top dog at Samsung, but the smartphone maker is showing Bada some love by introducing three new Bada 2.0-powered smartphones at IFA 2011 in Berlin next month.

The three new phones are the Wave 3, the Wave M and the Wave Y. All three are powered by Bada 2.0, which is Samsung's own mobile operating system. Bada 2.0 offers features like voice recognition, Wi-Fi Direct and Near Field Communication (NFC) for 
mobile payments

The Samsung Wave 3 offers a 4" Super AMOLED display and a slim body made of anodized aluminum. Wi-Fi Direct, seamless push notifications and improved multitasking are a few listed features for the convenience of the consumer. 

The Samsung Wave M revolves around the social aspect of mobile technology. It is the first Samsung smartphone to come equipped with ChatON, which is Samsung's proprietary mobile communication service that works across most mobile devices and links all of the user's contacts instantly, allows the sharing of content and conversations across mobile platforms and PC, and the creation of "micro-communities" through group chat. The Wave M has a 3.65" HVGA screen made of tempered glass with a metallic body, and features streamlined messaging feeds, enhanced Web browsing, optional NFC and Wi-Fi applications. It's definitely the social member of the three. 

The Wave Y is more of a starter set for new 
smartphone users. It features a metallic body and a 3.2" HVGA screen as well as simple personalization via Lock Screen, Live Panel and Folder management for the new smartphone user who is experiencing the technology for the first time. Music Hub allows the user to manage portable music easily, and Social Hub as well as ChatON will be available for mobile social networking. 

Customers who purchase any one of the three new Samsung smartphones will be able to utilize Samsung Apps, which is an integrated application store specifically for Samsung that offers local to global content. 

"Smartphones are 
gaining popularity by the day," said JK Shin, President of Samsung Mobile Communications. "The new additions to the Wave portfolio are the first to benefit from the power of our Bada 2.0 platform; the full extent of our commitment is clear to see in each device. We've produced easy-to-use smartphones that will inspire the market."



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Popularity
By ajfink on 8/30/2011 11:25:50 AM , Rating: 2
I understand Samsung wanting a home-grown OS in the light of all the hairy legalities currently surrounding Android, but surely Samsung understands that Bada will never take off outside of South Korea (where Samsung is gospel). The recent rumors of Samsung pursuing webOS would essentially render Bada moot if it comes to fruition.

Am I alone in seeing this simply never take off, especially in North America / Europe?




RE: Popularity
By Flunk on 8/30/2011 11:39:43 AM , Rating: 2
Bada exists because it's cheaper for Samsung to use than other OSes (for both legal and engineering reasons). They'll slap it on to all their low-end Smartphones because of this.


RE: Popularity
By rhangman on 8/30/2011 12:09:55 PM , Rating: 2
They already sell more Bada handsets than WP7 (Samsung WP7, not necessarily all WP7). Not sure they ever released any in the US though?

As for low end. The original Wave had similar specs to all high end phones of the time. Better specs than the iPhone 4 which I believe actually came out later. The way Bada is designed though with multiple kernel options is probably more scalable to low end devices than other OS'. Wave 3 is apparently only 1.4GHz single core, so somewhat disappointing. Possible that is wrong though since I have never heard of a single core Exynos SoC.


RE: Popularity
By Miggleness on 8/30/2011 1:00:09 PM , Rating: 2
I still have the original wave phone and it really pales in comparison against similar spec'd Android devices. Samsung takes forever to roll out updates. RAM is only 256MB, but Samsung wouldn't tell you that. I constantly get out of memory error messages.

But for it's price, it's a pretty OK phone. Build quality is excellent. Battery life is very good too.

However, I'm dodging the next Wave phone. It's either Iphone 4S/5 or GalaxyS2 for my next phone.


RE: Popularity
By shiftypy on 9/1/2011 8:33:52 AM , Rating: 2
I own original Wave as well. My requirements are too small to need a full blown Android. Thus I don't agree that super AMOLED "pales" compared to anything. If you don't need more than Wave offers, its an excellent smartphone.

Now I wonder if they keep the promise and release Bada 2.0 for it.


RE: Popularity
By shiftypy on 9/1/2011 8:39:24 AM , Rating: 2
after posting that went to badaforum and found out that bada 2.0 firmware for my Wave is already out!

lets go and brick my phone now


RE: Popularity
By carniver on 8/30/2011 1:12:04 PM , Rating: 4
If Bada takes off and gets some marketshare, expect Apple to sue it just as hard as Android. That'll make Bada just as expensive on the legal side. At least Android is more or less free on the engineering side


RE: Popularity
By rudy on 8/30/2011 3:18:11 PM , Rating: 2
This is true. The problem with google is they jumped off a linux platform that did not have a large patent pool below it. So they get a lawsuit for every feature which other OS companies already patented. Bada is unlikely to be any different unless samsung buys into an established OS like webOS or symbian to get an IP library under it for cross liscense agreements.


RE: Popularity
By drycrust3 on 8/31/2011 1:12:18 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
The problem with google is they jumped off a linux platform that did not have a large patent pool below it. So they get a lawsuit for every feature which other OS companies already patented.

Maybe this problem could be overcome if they didn't actually supply a decent OS with the phone, just an OS that just has the capability to surf to a website where you can download and install one that is decent e.g. Android, Windows Phone 7 (when it gets here), etc. Then, when someone wants to sue them because it infringes on some American patent they say, "No, we sold the phone with an OS that doesn't infringe on your patents, you need to speak to the customer."


RE: Popularity
By inperfectdarkness on 8/31/2011 9:02:54 PM , Rating: 2
can i use bing on this?

/dumb humor


Bada
By cheechmo on 8/30/2011 1:16:56 PM , Rating: 2
Does the Bada interface really look like what they are showing in the pics? It looks eerily similar to TouchWiz.




RE: Bada
By priusone on 8/30/2011 6:40:01 PM , Rating: 4
I'm sure if you photoshop the dimensions a little bit, they will look like iPhones.


Maybe if free..
By nocturne_81 on 8/30/2011 2:49:32 PM , Rating: 2
These are intended as feature phones, right..? I can't imagine many will pay much for these with outdated androids/iphones clogging the budget end and Nokia's impending firesale on their remaining symbian stock (in addition to the WP7 feature phones they plan on releasing soon); especially as I'm sure all 3 models will require an 'unlimited' data plan from carriers, like every other smartphone..




By tayb on 8/31/2011 12:10:37 AM , Rating: 2
This was competing directly with the iPhone before Android came along. No wonder the phone manufacturers were shitting their pants. I still remember the options for a touch screen smart phone back around when the iPhone originally launched... $800 iPhone, $200 PoS from Verizon that had a resistive touch screen... (shudder)

Thank you google overlords for this Droid X.




"What would I do? I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders." -- Michael Dell, after being asked what to do with Apple Computer in 1997














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