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Print 10 comment(s) - last by BRB29.. on Apr 9 at 7:55 AM

The Army isn't keeping issued smartphones secure

As smartphones that run Google’s Android OS and Apple’s iOS have become more popular with the general population, they have found favor with soldiers and other military leaders. As a result, the U.S. military recently conducted an audit with the goal of evaluating how personal mobile devices affect a soldier's professional duty.

The audit specifically looked at the use of iOS, Android, and Windows Mobile devices among Army personnel and in Army facilities when the devices were connected to Wi-Fi networks. The Department of Defense says that it tracked the use of 842 devices and believes that the findings in the audit are indicative of the over 14,000 mobile devices that the Army has purchased for soldiers.

The audit reportedly found weaknesses in the mobile strategy of the Army and reports indicate that the Army Chief Information Officer, Lieutenant General Susan S Lawrence, failed to give a number of critical instructions to Army personnel. According to the audit, Lawrence did not require secure storage for data on mobile devices.

The audit also found that Lawrence didn't require the military to keep devices free of malware and monitor mobile devices while they were connected to computers. In addition, the audit discovered that there were almost 15,000 unauthorized devices in use with the Army.

The audit specifically discovered that there were 276 mobile devices in use at one facility while the chief information officer was only aware of 180 of those devices. Other concerns raised by the audit included the fact that many of the Army's mobile devices have no password protection, ran outdated versions of operating system, and many had no protective software installed.

Source: Fox News



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Uh?
By BRB29 on 4/8/2013 10:46:46 AM , Rating: 3
"Rogue Smartphones Pose Threats the U.S. Military"

Please change to "rogue smartphones pose threats to the US military"

This is nothing new. As new products are out, they will discover new way to use it in their malicious ways. They'll been using cell phones and smartphones to detonate bombs for nearly a decade. Nokia is the most popular brand by terrorists.




RE: Uh?
By Manch on 4/8/2013 3:28:12 PM , Rating: 2
Everytime I see articles like this it reminds of these quotes:

quote:
Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.

and
quote:
If you make something idiot proof, someone will just make a better idiot.


RE: Uh?
By GotThumbs on 4/8/2013 4:55:29 PM , Rating: 3
Black Berry is THE most secured, but I still like my Droid.

Some informative reading on encryption used on BB.

http://www.cio.com/article/731216/BlackBerry_Detai...


Simple activesync policies
By jimbojimbo on 4/8/2013 11:51:08 AM , Rating: 2
Several of their concerns are met easily but setting some basic ActiveSync policies and blocking those devices that do not full accept them in Exchange. That is IF they are connecting their email.




RE: Simple activesync policies
By Argon18 on 4/8/2013 12:03:33 PM , Rating: 1
Not everybody uses Exchange. Some prefer more secure and more flexible solutions from other vendors, particularly when sensitive data is involved.


RE: Simple activesync policies
By Manch on 4/8/2013 3:28:52 PM , Rating: 2
US Military uses exchange


RE: Simple activesync policies
By BRB29 on 4/9/2013 7:51:10 AM , Rating: 2
depends, there's different types of email accounts and they are entirely different servers.

US military does use Microsoft Exchange server for their regular email


Since when?
By inperfectdarkness on 4/8/2013 9:39:04 PM , Rating: 2
Since when are ANY electronic devices allowed to be connected to military networks? We've had a ban on thumb-drives for a couple years. *Scratches head*




RE: Since when?
By BRB29 on 4/9/2013 7:55:52 AM , Rating: 2
I'm guessing you have not achieved any significant rank or any critical billets. The military and the DoD has been using these devices for a while. And the ban on thumb drives is not a ban. It's a restriction for most users. Unless you have a drive that is checked, certified, correct software installed, and you received a waiver, then you can use it.
But if you are not important then of course, you wouldn't know about that because no one wants you to or will approve your waiver.


By GotThumbs on 4/8/2013 4:44:30 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
found weaknesses in the mobile strategy of the Army and reports indicate that the Army Chief Information Officer, Lieutenant General Susan S Lawrence, failed to give a number of critical instructions to Army personnel. According to the audit, Lawrence did not require secure storage for data on mobile devices.


I guess Jobs would say....."Your using it wrong". It's time for the blame game. I bet that CIO was against using IOS and Android phones in the first place. He's just the sucker getting the blame.

This story is NOT a surprise to me or anyone else who has a reasonable level of knowledge on this technology.

Security has always been BB's strength and this is THE perfect opportunity for them to get back to being the best secured cell phone. BB was the only phone the Arab's and other countries couldn't get access to the users texts/emails.

IOS and Android are NOT secured like BB. I have an android and understand its limits, but if I NEEDED a secure phone...BB would be my choice.

Apple just sucks IMO.

Best wishes BB,




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