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  (Source: CNET)
Windows 7 nears general availability

The year's most highly anticipated software release, Windows 7, is just around the corner.  Microsoft recently announced that the new OS would see general availability (consumer sales) on October 22.  In preparation for that, it recently began its termination of the beta program, encouraging users to install the Release Candidate build which will be available until August.

A bevy of Windows blogs including Neowin.netGeekSmack.net, and Wzor report that the final "gold" build of Windows 7 will occur on July 10 and the OS will see a release-to-manufacturing on July 13.  Release to manufacturing builds are typically identical to general availability builds for major software releases.  However, if a major bug is encountered, its possible the consumer release could feature something new.  

The main purpose of the RTM build will be to give hardware manufacturers more time to tweak their drivers with a working "final" version of Windows 7.  The release of the build will coincide with the kickoff of Microsoft's Worldwide Partner Conference (WWPC) set to kick off in New Orleans.

Reportedly TechNet, MSDN, and a few other partner connections will all get the RTM build on July 13.  Also, it can be expected that the build will quickly leak onto torrents -- all of Microsoft's previous "private" releases leaked in short time.

U.S. and Canadian consumers have until Saturday, July 11 to pre-order Windows 7 at an ultra cheap price of $49.99 for a Home Premium upgrade or $99.99 for an upgrade to the professional edition.  Pre-orders in UK, Japan, France, and Germany will run from July 15 to August 14.



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RTM didn't help Vista
By AlexWade on 7/3/2009 10:52:12 AM , Rating: 5
I am a TechNet subscriber and Vista was RTM a few months before it was released. I had a copy before it went on sale. If I remember correctly, it was two months. Despite that, hardware makers were still caught with their pants down when the Vista was released to the public. Why? My theory is laziness. I had a hard time getting good drivers for my hardware from anybody.

I am convinced that two things destroyed Vista. First, the laziness of hardware makers in just assuming everything would work fine on Vista and thus lag on their drivers. Second, the laziness of PC makers who did not fully test Vista out to see how much more strict the hardware requirements were to run Vista and thus released Vista machines with near the minimum specs and label machines Vista ready which should have never had Vista to begin with. Bad news spreads quickly. I am convinced that it is was not Microsoft's fault for Vista bad reputation. Some of the early computers built when Vista came out should never have had Vista. Many did not even have 1GB of memory!

Bringing this back around to Windows 7, do you really think these same lazy people companies learned their lesson from Vista? I doubt it. I doubt it because Microsoft was blamed and not them. There was no heat on them. The difference this time is 7 is just Vista optimized. The 7 launch will go much smoother, but only because 7's kernel is similar to Vista's kernel.

In keeping with Microsoft's history, Windows 8 (pretend the numbering scheme continues) will likely also have the Vista kernel as well. But Windows 9 will have a new kernel. I am willing to bet that hardware and PC makers will once again be caught with their pants down then as well even if Windows 9 is RTM 6 months in advance of launch.

Windows 7 will be a great success. I noticed the RTM to retail time for Windows 7 is longer than it was for Vista. Microsoft learned a lesson, did the rest of the computer world?




RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Pirks on 7/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By JasonMick (blog) on 7/3/2009 12:52:37 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
...a few iMac-like monoblocks, price them Apple way and there you go - MS will have profitable hardware business and a few techies with deep pockets can get their PROPERLY supported Win9/Win10/WinXXX hardware right at the day of the release to market.


No need to. In case you missed it, Windows 7 unlike some other OS's is so lean it can run on a Pentium II with 96 MB of RAM -- it should be very usable on any modern retail computer.

Really, there's only one void in the premium systems market with Windows currently, and that's the lightweight notebook division. There's plenty of high-end ultra-performing PCs, some nice small form factor designs, and really nice larger notebooks. However, Apple wins in one category -- notebooks under four pounds. Microsoft could sell a model in this category (or any other manufacturer could) and with Windows 7 and by accepting a slightly smaller profit margin in return for stronger hardware, it could easily outsell the likes of the MacBook Pro.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Pirks on 7/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By mandrews on 7/3/2009 2:03:26 PM , Rating: 1
I don't think Microsoft necessarily has worse than average hardware, though its had its problems. I mean for all the RROD gripes, that was no worse than the iPhone's issues over the last couple generations. I think the Xbox 360 is a pretty strong product, and arguably the top next gen console for hardcore gaming (though the Wii is obviously dominating thanks to casual gaming).

The next gen OLED Zune looks pretty decent too. Might give the iPod Touch a run for its money (though the App store gives the Touch an advantage.

I think the biggest obstacle for Microsoft getting into the computer hardware business would merely be image. Its known for its PC OS's, not its computer hardware. I think it probably could make a PC with some pretty sweet hardware, but how the public would perceive such an offering is more questionable.

Also there'd be antitrust issues, considering its dominant marketshare in the OS business -- the EU and their ilk would likely perceive the release of proprietary hardware as favoritism and an antitrust violation.

Not saying it won't happen -- just not very likely. I think much more likely is that we'll see some lightweight Win7 notebooks with decent graphics from HP/Dell in coming months.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By JasonMick (blog) on 7/3/2009 2:04:59 PM , Rating: 1
I don't know... the new OLED Zune just doesn't have much to set it above the iPod Touch


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By mandrews on 7/3/2009 2:12:28 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
I don't know... the new OLED Zune just doesn't have much to set it above the iPod Touch


Er... Why do you say that? The Zune HD has multitouch, HD radio, and HDMI. The iPod Touch has none of those features. I am more than inclined to pick a Zune HD up this Fall.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Pirks on 7/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Boze on 7/3/09, Rating: 0
RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Targon on 7/4/2009 7:47:08 AM , Rating: 1
You mean iPhone 4G which will only support 4G features in maybe 10 markets if users are lucky? The iPod line will not have cell abilities, so no need for a 3G or 4G option. In theory it might have wireless built in, but that remains to be seen.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By mandrews on 7/3/2009 2:51:51 PM , Rating: 2
Edit:
The Zune HD has multitouch, too. And it has HD radio and HDMI -- the iPod Touch doesn't have either of those features.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Pirks on 7/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By omnicronx on 7/3/2009 4:04:36 PM , Rating: 2
Yes in fact, 2010 will bring manual transmissions to the Acura TL, and Volvo S80 (may have been in 2009), which will set them apart from the competition. (TL,S80 and Jag X-type are its main competitors). The ES not having an option for a manual transmission will leave out a large portion of the under 50 market without it.

In other words, features like Multitouch were what set the iPod/Phone apart from the competition in the first place, so its not that far fetched to think that these additional features will take sales away from Apple.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Pirks on 7/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By scrapsma54 on 7/6/2009 12:32:50 AM , Rating: 2
Well I think the problem with the zune is that Microsoft has made a device with such potential Such as Upgradeable firmware, Wifi, and the Zune pass, but being at it is a proprietary device I don't think they really had that stroke of genious to innovate upon the features on existing devices yet. Sure games are great direction and a direct to device feature is awesome and Zune Pass sure is a great treat, but There is potential unused. Microsoft has a chance to improve the zunes image just like the PS3.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Pirks on 7/3/09, Rating: -1
RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By JasonMick (blog) on 7/3/2009 3:19:04 PM , Rating: 2
I didn't know you were a gamer :) I think the PS3 gives the Xbox 360 a run for its money in the hardcore gamer market, though the Xbox does sell a lot of software.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By mandrews on 7/3/2009 3:27:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
PS3 gives the Xbox 360 a run for its money


My kids would disagree. I actually don't play video games much, I don't really have time for games. But I do find it of interest to follow how the industry is doing.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By stubeck on 7/3/2009 9:47:40 PM , Rating: 2
Xbox 360 vs PS3 is pretty even right now. Its mainly whether you want great online play (that you pay for over time) or blu ray (that you pay for immediately) being the biggest differences between the two consoles, other then the controllers. The exclusives have shrunk, and most of those are made by either Microsoft or Sony anyways.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By crystal clear on 7/4/2009 8:01:31 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
though the Xbox does sell a lot of software


Thats where the real profits are ....on game consoles you lose money & recover it through sales of games(software).

Now to update you on PS3-

Soon PS3 will become highest selling game console in the market,you ask why ? read this.

When the PS3 Slim launches later this year, it will arrive with full, software-based backwards compatibility.

but the continued success of the PS2 shows there is an audience for these games, and the ability to play PS2 games on the PS3 is—in our opinion—a selling point that adds value to the system. Add that to the PS3 Slim, launch at a good price point, and you have quite the news story.

http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2009/06/sony-ma...

The patent was filed in December of 2008, and shows a method where the Cell could fully emulate the Emotion Engine. "Figure 2 from the patent is a schematic drawing of how the system works. Figure 3A is a drawing of the PlayStation 2's chipset. Figure 3B is the emotion engine. Figure 4 is where the whole story gets interesting!" Spencer Yip writes. "It's 'an example of a host system based on a cell processor that may be configured to emulate the target system.' The target is figure 3B, the Emotion Engine."

http://www.siliconera.com/2009/06/29/sony-patents-...


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By stubeck on 7/4/2009 1:53:34 PM , Rating: 2
The original PS3 had full backwards compatibility as well, but that didn't really help it. At this point, pretty much everyone who wants a PS2 will have one already.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Danish1 on 7/3/2009 6:34:49 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Also there'd be antitrust issues, considering its dominant marketshare in the OS business -- the EU and their ilk would likely perceive the release of proprietary hardware as favoritism and an antitrust violation.


"their ilk" would be the US companies filing complaints about their fellow US companies breaking EU law?

You Americans are funny.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By sbtech on 7/6/2009 8:30:28 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I wish MS did some nice MacBook Air-like ultralite notebook that beats Apple's one, but it is too much to ask for at the moment.


Allow me to contradict you and Jason on this point. Even though Microsoft doesnot have a Macbook Air alternative, there are other vendors which do have similar systems with better/more features.

Take the Lenovo X301 for example, it is 13.3 inch ultra portable with a multitude of features - Ethernet, 3 USB, DVD Dual burner, display port, replaceable battery, additional battery in DVD drive bay, SSD, internal rollcage design, etc. And it fits in that yellow envelop too ;) Agreed, it doesn't appeal to college students, but it does appeal to the market of business users, the ones Lenovo targets.

I have been running Windows7 64bit on the X300, which has a smaller ssd and D-Sub port in place of display port(yet to find a customer's projector which doesn't take standard D-Sub). It runs rock steady, and this is my "production" machine. Got all hardware hotkeys working, even the blue light glows on the ThinkVantage button(yeah yeah I know, but still :P ).

It is true, these Thinkpads are built for business users in mind, but if I were buying it for myself, I will go for a understated black mat finish with non-glossy screen any day over a white silvery thing. But that is where personal taste comes into play. Then we have Dell Adama or something like that.

Microsoft does not need to start producing their own notebooks. They should simply concentrate on their core competencies rather than diversifying into a heavily competed area, specially in this economy.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By jonp on 7/3/2009 3:45:18 PM , Rating: 2
Jason, The only problem with your response is, oh ya drivers. There are lots of graphics cards, especially on board Intel ones for which there are NO Vista drivers, let alone Win7 drivers. MS & Intel together are causing a lot of premature obsolescence of PC systems due to their lack of driver availability. Even if Win7 will run on the processor/memory combination. And graphics hardware can't be changed in Notebooks/Netbooks.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By omnicronx on 7/3/2009 4:07:45 PM , Rating: 2
You would be surprised how many legacy drivers are available in Vista/Windows 7, it may require using Windows Update, but they do exist. Most Intel based onboard graphics going back a number of years are supported for example.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Kougar on 7/4/2009 12:36:12 AM , Rating: 2
Except, Windows 7 is so "lean" that it has even worse battery life than Vista on Apple laptops. And both flavors of Windows are solidly beaten by OS X in this category. Whatever else, that is the kind of lean that shows results. This has been ongoing for years and the clear tend is that each Windows release is only getting worse for battery life.

I think Apple generally wins in the premium laptop category, if price isn't a major issue. Their OS simply offers better battery life, and if the rest of the hardware wasn't so overpriced it'd be an extremely attractive offering.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By stromgald30 on 7/6/2009 5:46:57 PM , Rating: 2
Comparing Win7 or Vista to OS X on Apple laptops isn't exactly a fair comparison. There's probably been a lot of optimization by Apple on their solution. Microsoft doesn't do nearly as much optimization between hardware and software. The battery life issue is as much the fault of the laptop makers as it is Microsoft.

Another interesting thing to note is that Win7 is supposed to provide a minimum 11% boost in battery life, according to Microsoft and their released test data. I haven't seen much independent testing on the subject yet other than that one anandtech article.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Kougar on 7/10/2009 5:16:42 PM , Rating: 2
That's the question at hand, whether there are power saving features in the hardware that only OS X is able to "hook" into. I'll openly admit I don't know the answer to this, but as Anand happens to be pretty close to an expert in such things and I can follow his logic on this one I've adopted his opinion that this shouldn't matter significantly.

I could be wrong. But, the hardware is still the same. Same Intel CPU and Intel chipsets, and NVIDIA GPU... there shouldn't be anything left hardware-wise to cause such a significant shift in power savings that I can think of.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By esandrs on 7/6/2009 1:34:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Really, there's only one void in the premium systems market with Windows currently, and that's the lightweight notebook division. There's plenty of high-end ultra-performing PCs, some nice small form factor designs, and really nice larger notebooks. However, Apple wins in one category -- notebooks under four pounds. Microsoft could sell a model in this category (or any other manufacturer could) and with Windows 7 and by accepting a slightly smaller profit margin in return for stronger hardware, it could easily outsell the likes of the MacBook Pro.


I dunno, the Lenovo X200 and X301 both seem like ok competitors to me...


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Donovan on 7/7/2009 1:06:24 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
so lean it can run on a Pentium II with 96 MB of RAM
It supposedly took 17 hours to install and 17 minutes to boot on a Pentium III, so "run" is probably not the right word. "Crawl", "limp", and "plod" seem more appropriate.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By JasonMick (blog) on 7/3/2009 12:34:03 PM , Rating: 2
While I agree with your premise that poor drivers due to laziness/incompetence on the part of hardware manufacturers hurt Vista's sales, I disagree that it "destroyed Vista". Vista sold very well -- the disappointment was that it failed to surpass Windows XP's great sales and that it received some bad press early on that distorted the public's image of the OS. Microsoft was as much a victim of its own expectation which have been set so high, its hard to deliver.

As to Windows 7, having played with RC build quite a bit and the beta build for some time, I've encountered only a few hardware incompatibilities (a couple printers). Overall it seems like the early drivers for the OS are quite good. And the lean footprint means that it should be able to run on systems with lower requirements.

I agree than the Win7 launch will go smoother, but I think this is partly due to hard work on Microsoft's part -- its tried to spur hardware partners with a mix of threats and incentives that have really done a good job at strengthening early driver support.

Stay tuned, I'll try to get my hands on a release to manufacturing build in a couple weeks and detail what's new since the release candidate.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By AlexWade on 7/3/2009 6:52:05 PM , Rating: 2
To this day, I have people asking me how bad Vista really is. The sales may have been good, but Vista's reputation was definitely destroyed.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By stubeck on 7/3/2009 9:53:29 PM , Rating: 2
My coworker, whose been in IT for almost 20 years, has never used Vista. He was one of those who went "OMG its horrible," before we were forced to use it because of memory issues and AutoCad. Vista's biggest problem is that because it was so delayed, people forgot that with a new OS, you have to learn the new features, some of which won't seem very nice to begin with.

In no way am I saying it was a great OS, but it was much better then people have said.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By crystal clear on 7/4/2009 7:15:32 AM , Rating: 2
Remember Vista downgraded to WinXP is NOT Vista sold but WinXP sold.

Microsoft defines it as Vista shipped therefore included in Vista sales.

Sorry thats distorted sales numbers/revenues just to give an impression that Vista sells very well.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By callmeroy on 7/7/2009 12:12:56 PM , Rating: 2
I see what you did there with your logic, but your logic in itself is distorted.

A sale is a sale is a sale.

MS still sold a vista license --- plain and simple, if that license was downgraded after the fact it doesn't matter - there was still a vista sale.

Your logic isn't total BS though --- in an ethical sense you are correct, but from an accounting sense of strict sales of a product selling is selling.

If I run a shop that sells widgets....I sell you 100 widgets, that within weeks for whatever reason you downgrade / upgrade to another companies widgets....not even using the ones I sold you now. I still am not lying or distorting the truth if I report your 100 widgets as a sale for me....because it was.

BTW....this type of "distortion" of the truth of sales figures --- is a near common practice by businesses the world over.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By crystal clear on 7/4/2009 6:57:23 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
Vista sold very well


Your claim is distorted !

Gartner's Silver notes that when Microsoft does talk Vista numbers, it talks about shipped licenses. But anyone who "downgrades" to XP was still shipped a Vista license, which distorts the numbers -- significantly

quote:
the disappointment was that it failed to surpass Windows XP's great sales and that it received some bad press early on that distorted the public's image of the OS.


The disappointement was VISTA as an O.S. itself ....thats why it failed to surpass the WinXP sales.

It recieved NOT some bad press, but huge amounts of bad press NOT only earlier but ALL through out till today.

Hey you are out of touch or refuse to accept the realities of life.

That distorted the public's image of the OS is NOT distorted, but the REAL image created in the minds of the public due to the O.S. itself.

Microsoft was as much a victim of the OEMs who pushed it hard to release an O.S. that was NOT yet ready for a release.

The OEMs used Vista to dump their hardware on unsuspecting mainstream buyers as Vista comapatible,to generate revenues/profits that they badly needed.

They used Vista/Microsoft marketing funds to push products that ultimately ended up in class action suites in courts.

Thats how the REAL public image against the Vista was formed,its NOT distorted its the real FACTS.

The whole launch of Vista was a disaster...ask the people in the marketplace & NOT Microsoft nor the press.

Again to remind you Vista downgraded to WinXP is not Vista sold rather WinXP sold.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By ncage on 7/3/2009 12:37:49 PM , Rating: 3
I agree with you partially. It was not only drivers though. Some software would not work. I even had issues with some of microsofts' own software although the fixed it relatively quickly (visual studio). Also your missing a big big reason vista was hated.....bloat. If you have recent hardware with plenty of memory you could probably run vista just fine but if you didn't watch out. It would run like a pig. I think this was a major reason people shied away from vista.

Now i will say microsoft had to make the security changes (not the bloat) no matter what people say. I actually agree with UAC. I leave it on. Do our linux users throw fits when they have to SUDO to change some administrative setting with linux? It doesn't bother me that much and if your doing something that doesn't require administrative privledges (say for example browsing on the web) and you recieve a UAC dialog you know something is wrong. UAC can get annoying sometimes with it ask you multiple times though (fixed in windows 7).

Some companies are still dragging their as$ on the software side. For example Nikon still has not released their codecs for NEF for x64 but hey thats microsoft's fault. Nikon get off your butt.

With that being said i think windows 7 has fixed all the problems in vista: Resource & Speed, XP Mode (Professional & Above) for software that just fails to work correctly (ive used xp mode and the integration is just awesome...nothing like loading up a vm to run whatever you want to run which is a PAIN).


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By AlexWade on 7/3/2009 6:49:22 PM , Rating: 2
There is a really good TechNet article about UAC and why some programs did not work in Vista. I read it in the magazine Microsoft sends to TechNet subscribers, but I've also linked the exact same article below.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2009.0...

I recommend you read it. To me it was a real eye-opener regarding UAC. Although it deals with 7's UAC, it explains why indirectly why Vista UAC caused problems. From the article:
quote:
However, Windows has had a long history of users running with administrative rights. As a result, software has often been developed to run in administrative accounts and take dependencies, often unintentionally, on administrative rights. ...

When UAC is enabled, all user accounts—including administrative accounts—run with standard user rights. This means that application developers must consider the fact that their software won't have administrative rights by default. This should remind them to design their application to work with standard user rights.


What I got out of the article was that a program did not follow best-practices by working just as well on a standard user as an administrator, the UAC system could cause the program not to work. Some programs were making registry entries in the global HKLM hive instead of the user HKLU hive like they should have been. UAC forced software engineers to use best-practices which in turn helps security.

I learned more about UAC from that article than anywhere else. When I get my final build, I am going to leave the UAC on.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By noirsoft on 7/4/2009 1:36:30 AM , Rating: 2
And keep in mind that those best practices were known about and pushed by Microsoft since before XP even came out. Some developers are really lazy or really incompetent. Some programs still write temp files and settings directly to "C:\Program Files" which requires the app to run as admin. Ugh.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Sulphademus on 7/6/2009 3:15:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Some programs still write temp files and settings directly to "C:\Program Files" which requires the app to run as admin. Ugh.


One thing I found to fix this was to go to the program's folder, like Harvard Graphics (I cant believe some people here still use it!), under the Program Files and grant all users modify rights on it. Leave them as standard user and leave UAC on. Fixes things with some programs written last decade.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By androticus on 7/3/2009 3:21:45 PM , Rating: 4
The biggest problem with Vista was that the original feature set included at least 3 big items which were ridiculous on their face and that were ultimately dropped from the product or massively watered down (WinFS, all the "cloud computing" stuff, and some new UI framework.) They went down Track 1 of development for nearly 3 years before realizing the product was a mess and that they basically needed to start a lot of stuff again from scratch. Also, the new protected video chain was vastly more complex than previous models, and put a huge strain on the vendors (ex AMD, nVIDIA, etc.). The final version was really put out in what was frankly a panic due to the now huge delay in release, and was clearly not properly optimized nor tested and tweaked for compatibility. I strongly suspect Windows 7 will be MUCH better (ex. faster, etc.) than Vista, basically because they have now had a couple years to properly optimize stuff, driver support is now good, and they aren't replacing nearly so much stuff.

But I have to say that all of this could have been prevented if they had an actually COMPETENT CEO, not the posturing idiot at the helm now. Bill Gates had a great balance of business savvy and tech fluency, and you can make criticisms of this and that (lord knows I sure have) but overall their stuff worked and let you get your job done. But since monkey-boy, the inmates have clearly been running the asylum...


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By Pirks on 7/3/2009 3:49:30 PM , Rating: 2
If monkeyboy is running the Win7 show why is Win7 so good then? Is it a different monkeyboy this time or what?


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By raphd on 7/5/2009 3:49:11 PM , Rating: 2
I agree with all. However, next Windows will only be 64bit I bet, which will cause a few more issues from those lazy hardware makers.


RE: RTM didn't help Vista
By rburnham on 7/6/2009 2:34:33 PM , Rating: 2
I second the driver idea. People kept telling me "Vista sucks" and I'd ask why, and it was almost always a driver issue. Nvidia was a big culprit, but ATI was not guilt-free either.

Pretty good summary of events.


M != Market
By dagamer34 on 7/3/2009 10:33:52 AM , Rating: 5
RTM = Release to MANUFACTURING, not release to market. The public will not be able to get Windows 7 on July 13th.

Please fix!




RE: M != Market
By glenn8 on 7/3/2009 10:53:14 AM , Rating: 5
Agreed. Pretty bad for a "tech" blog to not get such a basic thing right...


RE: M != Market
By mfed3 on 7/3/2009 11:15:02 AM , Rating: 5
What do you expect, Jason Mick is the worst journalist on DailyTech who has no idea what hes talking about and writes senseless analyst driven articles about Apple 90% of the time.


RE: M != Market
By mikefarinha on 7/3/2009 11:21:19 AM , Rating: 3
I agree.

quote:
In preparation for that, it recently began its termination of the beta program, encouraging users to install the Release Candidate build which will be available until August.


I don't understand how he wrote a whole article with the assumption that Microsoft 'began' its termination of the beta program. He doesn't seem to know that the beta was time-limited, like the RC and the only thing Microsoft 'began' was reminding its users of the impending expiration date that was built in to the beta build from the beginning.


RE: M != Market
By sieistganzfett on 7/3/2009 9:27:58 PM , Rating: 1
rtm means a lot of things.. back in the day, it meant.. r eady t ommorrow m aybe.

you guys look into Jason's poor wording way too much. i know he isn't the best journalist, he might even agree with that statement. However, he tries every time. and that's all i expect from here. ::laughing::


RE: M != Market
By callmeroy on 7/7/2009 12:20:36 PM , Rating: 3
don't call him a journalist -- and no I don't care if he gets upset over that.....to call someone who blogs or copies news snippets from across the web a journalist is as funny as the old joke of those who pump gas for a living and calling them "petroleum engineers".

Its funny unless you are really an engineer (or in this case unless you are really a journalist) (btw for the deadbrains out there....I'm not claiming to be either- just stating examples)


RE: M != Market
By crystal clear on 7/4/09, Rating: -1
By SlipDizzy on 7/3/2009 10:03:53 AM , Rating: 3
BALLMER UPPERCUT!




By KGBird on 7/3/2009 11:47:38 AM , Rating: 2
Actually it looks like he setting up for a reverse punch. But with his left arm dangling like that, he's wide open for a hook and will be soon kissing the canvas.


By Boze on 7/3/2009 6:10:04 PM , Rating: 2
Uh, haven't you people ever played Street Fighter II, III, or IV? Ballmer has obviously been trained by Sagat; look at how far back that fist is! Ballmer Shot incoming! MICROSOFT-DOU-KEN!


Ok but...
By ZoZo on 7/3/2009 10:54:22 AM , Rating: 2
1) As stated above, RTM = Release To Manufacturing

2)
quote:
However, if a major bug is encountered, its possible the consumer release could feature something new.


It would have to be a real showstopper. That's practically impossible judging by the RC and the internal quality control they've been having since beginning of June.
Once the RTM build ships to manufacturers, any bug fix is released on Windows Update.




RE: Ok but...
By Targon on 7/4/2009 7:50:08 AM , Rating: 2
It could be that a major show stopper prevented something new from being seen up until this point, so in theory, there COULD be something new added to the RTM version.


hold on hold on wtf?
By xDrift0rx on 7/3/2009 11:04:25 AM , Rating: 2
The article states that the RC will be available until august...why does it say that the RC is good until June of 2010 then??? Or am i getting the RTM and RC mixed..




RE: hold on hold on wtf?
By achintya on 7/3/2009 11:51:05 AM , Rating: 2
The RC will be available for download off Microsoft's servers till August and the expiry date for it is set for June 2010 so it's "good" till then. After that, a publicly released version will available for purchase will be the "only" way to use the RC(provided hackers/pirates do not crack it).


So close, MSDN about to expire...
By VaultDweller on 7/3/2009 9:54:21 AM , Rating: 1
My MSDN subscription has an expiry date of June 30 (which was Tuesday) - however, it's still appearing as active and I can still get downloads and keys. I don't know how long this will last, but man I'm hoping it will last for 10 more days so I can get the RTM build for free.




By sieistganzfett on 7/3/2009 9:34:03 PM , Rating: 2
MS was taking note of that and closing your account as you posted that.


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