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Print 26 comment(s) - last by subflava.. on May 28 at 5:06 PM

HDTV sales continue to rack up, even in a sluggish economy

Even though many consumer markets have struggled the past few months, market research indicates the high-definition TV market continues to thrive, with Q1 sales numbers increasing 17 percent up to 7.8 million units sold.

"Amid the current economic downturn, a new wave of cocooning has hit, with recession-wary U.S. consumers eschewing travel, staying home and watching their televisions,” said Joe Abelson, iSuppli VP of displays.  “However, they still are finding enough money to buy new flat-panel sets that offer superior pictures and larger sizes.”

Many consumers are targeting cheaper TVs made by value brands, with HDTV adoption rates expected to continue to increase.  Around 70 percent of all TV purchases were valued at $1,000 or less, a seven percent increase from the same time in 2008.    

"Despite the current economic climate, HD is on course to becoming the benchmark in television viewing," Nielsen researchers said.  "As prices of HDTVs continue to fall and circumstances such as the Digital Television Transition create opportunities to further promote HD sets and services, HDTV will gain a greater foothold in U.S. television homes."

Research published at the end of last year by Nielsen indicated HDTV penetration was the highest in Washington D.C., Boston and New York City, with sporting events from the NFL and NBA still the most popular HDTV programs.  At the end of last year, 23.2 percent -- around 26 million U.S. homes -- had at least one HDTV.

An increasing number of content providers are rolling out HD channels, with at least one channel, HDNet, designed specifically to handle a variety of sports programming and other content available in HD only.

Furthermore, standalone Blu-ray player sales also increased due to falling prices of the players, movies and HDTVs, the NPD Group said in a statement published a few weeks ago.  A living room with a Blu-ray player and HDTV is a combination expected to help get consumers to watch more movies and HD content while avoiding other leisure activities.



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Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By tmouse on 5/28/2009 8:30:05 AM , Rating: 4
Of course its growing, its pretty much the only game in town. Many have bought one in part due to confusion over the digital Tv switch over. It will undoubtedly continue to grow but the number of sets per household will probably drop due to the higher price per unit. So this is news? Seems more like blog bait to me.




RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By mdogs444 on 5/28/2009 8:52:22 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
It will undoubtedly continue to grow but the number of sets per household will probably drop due to the higher price per unit.

Not sure what you mean by this, but televisions are probably cheaper now than they've ever been. Look back 20 or so years ago and tell me what a standard 32" Sony Trinitron tube tv went for.

Televisions now are very affordable, smaller in size, wall mountable, and serve multiple functions (movies, computer screens, games, etc), so people will probably have more per household than they used to have. I live by myself, gf lives there part time, and have a 3 bedroom townhouse with 6 LCD & Plasma televisions. Necessary? No. But they take up little space and are affordable to put where you want.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By tmouse on 5/28/2009 9:07:56 AM , Rating: 3
Pre flat screens; the average price was around $250,these were smaller sets of course, but $500 was considered the limit the average consumer would pay for a television. The average home had between 3 to 5 televisions. Now the average is closer to $700 for the sets offered in the major box stores (that's for sets above 26 inches). With respect, your situation is far from average.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By mdogs444 on 5/28/2009 9:14:51 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
the average price was around $250,these were smaller sets of course, but $500 was considered the limit the average consumer would pay for a television.

Not sure if we're all just throwing around bunk statistics or not. But the reason I said they are cheaper is because we paid about $2000 for a 32" Sony Trinitron back in the 80's which was supposed to be one of the best of its kind.

Your saying the average is about $700 for the tv set today, but what is the average size? Back 20 years ago, the average size was probably in the 27" range for that price if not more.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By tmouse on 5/28/2009 9:19:42 AM , Rating: 2
Your right the sets are bigger today, but people do not look a tv's as a price per unit item in general. Its the cost, now size is a factor (where have I heard that before?) but I am saying the average price for a Tv is significantly higher today than only 5 years ago. The average family will probably have fewer but large Tv's.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By tmouse on 5/28/2009 9:14:34 AM , Rating: 2
That should be 40 inch not 26, must stop working on three things at once or add a third monitor to my desk.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By Ratinator on 5/28/2009 12:27:42 PM , Rating: 2
3-5 average....wow, everyone I know must be poor or something. 2-3 average sounds more reasonable.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By kake on 5/28/2009 12:40:33 PM , Rating: 2
Indeed. I know of only one person who has more than two screens in their house, and that's because their kids are antisocial.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By Spuke on 5/28/2009 2:24:19 PM , Rating: 2
I have four TV's. Three are CRT's that I've had for quite a while though. My newest TV is three years old (DLP).


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By subflava on 5/28/2009 5:06:06 PM , Rating: 2
Keep in mind the effects inflation. $500 20 years ago is equivalent to around $1000 today (assuming a 3.5% inflation rate or so) In relative terms TV's seem a lot cheaper today from what I remember. Seems 27" TV's were the "standard" back in the early 90's and they were $400 for the cheap no names. My dad paid like $700 for a 27" Sony in the early 90's.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By KentState on 5/28/2009 9:16:14 AM , Rating: 3
Agree. I distinctly remember buying a 20" tv in 1995 for around $300. Then in 2001 I purchased a Panasonic 27" for around $450. Just quickly looking through Neweggs LCD tv's, it appears that the prices are just as good if not better than 10 years ago for the same size set.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By tmouse on 5/28/2009 9:23:24 AM , Rating: 2
I did say box stores, they usually do not carry many sets smaller than 37 inches (too small a profit margin). Most people still but Tv's locally.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By grandpope on 5/28/2009 11:44:21 AM , Rating: 1
If your comment was posted on wikipedia, it would have been deleted already due to a grip o' statements and no links to support it.

This seems more like blog bait to me.


RE: Can you even buy a non-HD tv?
By Hiawa23 on 5/28/2009 2:17:21 PM , Rating: 2
One aspect no one has mentioned is that I think the Xbox 360 & PS3 has contributed to an increase in HDTV sales, cause the only reason I bought both of my HDTVs was for this reason alone. I am fine with SD for TV & movie viewing but gaming in HD has just added another level of enjoyment for me.


No Surprise to Me
By oab on 5/28/2009 8:18:26 AM , Rating: 2
A major consumer electronics retailer where I live (2001 Audio Video) has said on television interviews that every time a recession hits their business goes through the roof.

They say that people still buy luxuries, and a big TV is a better value than a vacation to the Bahamas.




RE: No Surprise to Me
By mdogs444 on 5/28/2009 8:26:30 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
They say that people still buy luxuries, and a big TV is a better value than a vacation to the Bahamas.

Well I can't say that I enjoy sitting on my couch watching Rescue Me more than sitting on the beach, watching girls in bikinis, and drinking till I pass out...

But I can say that a television is one of those consumer electronics that people use on a daily basis and plan on having for many years to come. When they find themselves staying home more and are spending money on something that they don't plan on buying again for 5-10 years, perhaps a TV is just one of those items.


RE: No Surprise to Me
By crystal clear on 5/28/2009 9:27:39 AM , Rating: 2
"perhaps a HDTV etc is just one of those items" that falls under the catergory-If you have one then so must I ...

The "All Things Digital" fever spreads like the flu.

Anyway not worth investing NOW in stock exchange/ portfiolos/funds/etc might as well spend it & enjoy it, rather than to live with that constant fear of losing it.

You save for tomorrow...but when you are not sure if tomorrow your banks are still around or gone bust or your fund manager (like Madoff) swindled you & your money is gone.

Then you prefer to put your money to better use like
"All Things Digital".


RE: No Surprise to Me
By grandpope on 5/28/2009 11:48:08 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Well I can't say that I enjoy sitting on my couch watching Rescue Me more than sitting on the beach, watching girls in bikinis, and drinking till I pass out...


Nobody said you had to watch Rescue Me. Rent a copy of Girls Gone Wild, pour sand all over your couch, and let the binge drinking begin!


RE: No Surprise to Me
By Mitch101 on 5/28/2009 8:54:13 AM , Rating: 3
In a recession people tend to stay at home more than go out and TV being the usual entertainment outlet this is kind of understandable. Invest where your going to be spending the majority of your time.

A second reason would be people thinking they need a new TV because of Analog signal being shut down.

Im sure places like Best Buy and other TV sales places arent misguiding people into buying a new TV instead of getting the converter boxes or telling people they dont need them if they have a digital cable box or direct tv etc. /sarcasm off


Under $1000
By mdogs444 on 5/28/2009 8:22:07 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Many consumers are targeting cheaper TVs made by value brands, with HDTV adoption rates expected to continue to increase. Around 70 percent of all TV purchases were valued at $1,000 or less, a seven percent increase from the same time in 2008.

While I'm certain people are buying cheaper brands like Vizio, Westinghouse, Dynex to name a few, I think there is a bigger reason.

With the ability to get 50" Samsung and Panasonic plasmas, 40" Sony 1080p's, 42" LG's for under $800....that pretty much puts many mainstream brands in the under $1,000 bracket. A few years ago, it was hard to find a 32" standard Westinghouse for under $600. Now, you can get a Dynex 32" for about $300 (this past week in Best Buy).




RE: Under $1000
By Screwballl on 5/28/2009 9:49:30 AM , Rating: 2
agreed, we picked up a 32" 720p Vizio (used for DVDs and non-digital cable TV) for $400 a few months ago.


By crystal clear on 5/28/2009 9:42:29 AM , Rating: 1
Electronic Arts has just released "EA Sports Active" for the Nintendo Wii which comes with a resistance band and a leg strap that lets players perform aerobic activities like virtual roller blading, jogging, or lunging.

"With today's economy, people can't always afford gym memberships and personal trainers," said Alison Sweeney, host of NBC's "Biggest Loser" reality TV series.

"EA calls this game a "trainer in a box" and it really is. The game teaches you the right way to work out."

Sega has a new Wii game, "Daisy Fuentes Pilates" hosted by the former MTV personality, Namco Bandai has "Active Life: Extreme Challenge" for Wii, and Nintendo has "Wii Sports Resort."

Activision's "Tony Hawk: Ride" for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 adds physical play to the mix with a motion-sensor skateboard controller that translates gamers' physical moves into virtual tricks.

Exercise games have become an established genre for game publishers.

Konami Digital Entertainment introduced active games to the world with its "Dance Dance Revolution" game, which has sold over 11 million copies its 2001 launch.

Nintendo encouraged physical interaction with its Wii console and games like "Wii Sports" then took virtual exercise to another level last May with the "Wii Fit" which has sold over 14 million units worldwide, introducing gamers to yoga and mini-game workouts.

"Aside from the "Dance Dance Revolution" games, there have only been a handful of fitness games and, until the "Wii Fit" launched, none was particularly successful," said Michael Pachter, videogame analyst, Wedbush Morgan Securities.

He predicted strong sales for "EA Sports Active" and Sega's "Daisy Fuentes' Pilates."

Nintendo's Wii and "Wii Fit" have not only introduced more men to exercise but also paved a new avenue for female gamers.

"I've gotten e-mails from plenty of women who tell me that "Wii Fit" has helped them become more active, and it's clear that these women were not gamers to begin with,"

http://www.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUS...




By A5 on 5/28/2009 10:45:16 AM , Rating: 2
Wrong article dude.


Hmmm
By yacoub on 5/28/2009 8:25:32 AM , Rating: 2
Six months ago it was articles questioning whether all the Tier-2 HDTV brands would survive this economy. Now the HDTV market is unphased. Heh.




The sad fact is
By Dfere on 5/28/2009 9:39:51 AM , Rating: 2
No one is surprised that Joe Consumer is worried about his job, but still buys the mega TV.

Sad on so many fronts.

Wal Mart was still selling regular TV's in my area as of last week. Where are the consumer groups? (Just because you apply for a subsidized tuner doesn't mean you are going to get one).

My Digital air reception is terrible and I think this spells the end for non-profit public broadcasting. (Yes I am a Big Business conspiracy theorist.... no to JFK and no to Alien conspiracies)

No one wants to buy a cheap house, just an expensive TV. I just looked at a Condo in a nice cleveland area for $8000. How much do some of these TV's sell for?

And no one really is surprised by any of this.




Multi-use
By Hieyeck on 5/28/2009 10:59:01 AM , Rating: 2
With a merger of video standards, I for one have a TV for my monitor, and I'm sure I'm not the only one thinking like that...




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