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Print 25 comment(s) - last by topkill.. on Apr 8 at 12:58 PM

Infiniti to get its own luxury EV

Nissan may have gotten its feet wet with the Leaf all-electric hatchback, but the company is looking to fully take the plunge with the Infiniti LE Concept. While the LE is currently being shown in concept form, Nissan's luxury division says that a production version of the car will be released in 2014.
 
The LE is loosely based on the Leaf, and makes use of a 134hp/240 lb-ft electric motor. The motor is fed via a 24 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. Infiniti says that the LE has a driving range of 100 miles.
 
What's most interesting however, is that in addition to the standard DC 50 kW quick charging system, Infiniti could also offer a wireless charging system that can be installed in a home garage.

 
"In keeping with the Infiniti challenger mentality, the LE Concept includes a built-in Wireless Charging System, which we expect to be the first home-based wireless charging system if adapted for the production version," said Infiniti Americas Vice President Ben Poore. "All you have to do is park your vehicle over the charging pad with no need to connect cables."
 
The wireless charging system likely won't be as efficient at charging the LE as a traditional charger, but it's nice to see companies looking to advance the field in battery technology and complementary charging systems.
 
When it comes to styling, the LE is unlikely to win any award for originality as it looks like a Hyundai Sonata that has been left in the oven a bit too long from many angles. As for the interior, it looks close to production ready with very little needing to be changed for showroom duty.

 
Infiniti hasn't yet given us any details on pricing for the production version of the LE, but it should slot in somewhere between the $35,200 base price of the Nissan Leaf and the $57,400 price tag of the all-electric Tesla Model S.


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By quiksilvr on 4/5/2012 1:01:11 PM , Rating: 3
At that point you can just plug it in and get nearly perfect efficiency vs 90% efficiency.

Wireless charging makes more sense with on-street parking outside apartments or with parallel parking in the city. Unless they can get wireless charging efficiency to 99%, there's no point having it in the garage.




By KC7SWH on 4/5/2012 1:46:25 PM , Rating: 2
Not having to remember to unplug it when pulling out of your garage in the morning before your caffeine has started working.


By Shig on 4/5/2012 1:54:13 PM , Rating: 4
The same reason some cars have automatic rain-sensing wind shield wipers as opposed to flipping a switch.

The same reason some cars have pre-programmed seat positions so you don't have to expend 4 seconds putting the seat back to where you like it.

The same reason some cars have automatic blind spot recognition so you don't have to turn your neck 8 more degrees to check it.

Want me to keep going?


By TakeASeto on 4/5/2012 4:36:02 PM , Rating: 2
All of your examples are not the comparable to wireless charging. In your examples, there are no sacrifices being made. With wireless charging, you lose charging efficiency. This translates to being less "green" (the purpose of EV cars) and more money.


By ilkhan on 4/5/2012 10:54:13 PM , Rating: 2
Lose efficiency, gain convenience.
Don't have to remember to plug it in at night, don't have to remember to unplug it in the morning.


By Ringold on 4/6/2012 9:27:14 AM , Rating: 2
Who said it's about being green? Green is the excuse, but its all about making a social statement to project a certain image, as well as a quiet suggestion of "I have enough cash to blow on a car that can't make it to the next major metro area on a charge, therefore I probably have something big in my pants."

Psychology studies pretty much empirically prove a lot of (but not all obviously) charitable donations made and publicly bragged about are essentially civilized human equivalents of monkey chest-beating, the ultimate display of disposable income. This is no different.


By topkill on 4/8/2012 12:58:12 PM , Rating: 2
Ringold,

So which one has the smaller penis?
- They middle aged guy losing his hair and getting a Porsche and a trophy wife?
- The guy who buys a Prius and runs around acting like he's better than everyone else and his farts don't stink?

They both suck, but the penis metaphor belongs with the first one.

The second one is the guy who was a hall monitor in school and told on everyone so he could suck up to the teacher and be a good little boy.


By Mint on 4/7/2012 4:50:09 PM , Rating: 2
Almost every convenience costs money.

10% isn't that bad. That's what, 20 cents per charge, or $30 wasted electricity per 10,000 miles? I'd easily pay that much to prevent the couple times per year that I forgot to plug in.


By corduroygt on 4/5/2012 2:42:20 PM , Rating: 4
EV's already have safeguards against that, they won't move when plugged in.


By Samus on 4/6/2012 12:31:46 AM , Rating: 1
the leaf, volt, and roadster do not go into forward/reverse with a charger still plugged in.

so his point is valid. This makes more sense for public charging where, currently, some asshole kid could pull your plug while your at work/shopping and thinking your cars juicing up. This is a big concern, and is why the tesla roadster has an iphone app to inform you of charging status. The volt has a subscription for these services as well through onstar but its less of a concern with the volt...

wireless charging in garages makes no sense. To use inductive charging on a regular basis is a waste of energy.


By topkill on 4/6/2012 9:42:22 PM , Rating: 1
not an issue. The car won't start if it's plugged in so it's impossible to drive off with the cord still attached...it doesn't care if you have caffeine or if not, or if you're just a dumbass....it won't start.

It's called dumb-fuck proof. We have to do it in engineering all the time.


By sigmatau on 4/5/2012 2:39:31 PM , Rating: 2
MIT has made some nice improvements recently. They are at 90% if not higher (I've seen 95%) on their power transfer efficiency. It's nice to see research in this technology.

Look up Witricity if you want to learn more.

I would guess the wireless system would be by far the best as you will never forget to charge your vehicle and you won't have any accidents with leaving the charger plugged and you driving away with it attached. Infiniti is also luxury (well semi-luxury) so I guess this would also fit there.


By lennylim on 4/5/2012 2:45:26 PM , Rating: 3
5% to 10% loss of 24 kW is still pretty significant.

Oh, there's no danger of driving off with it plugged in. The car knows it is plugged in and will not allow you to drive off - I tried that.


By lennylim on 4/5/2012 2:40:30 PM , Rating: 2
Convenience. Why do people have wireless charging for their cell phones? Same reason.

I agree about efficiency though. I wouldn't use it, but some would.


By CharonPDX on 4/5/2012 7:37:08 PM , Rating: 2
With as often as my wife forgets to plug in our plug-in hybrid?

Yeah, I'll take "just park it here" charging, thanks.


By tng on 4/5/2012 9:16:30 PM , Rating: 2
Am I the only one who thinks that having this type of wireless charging system is akin to building your house under 500KV power transmission lines?

Is it really good for you long term to sleep in your bed at night above your garage where you have that type of wireless charging system running?


By topkill on 4/6/2012 9:46:34 PM , Rating: 2
Not really a problem. The strength of a electromagnetic field varies inversely with the square of the distance. The car has to be really close for it to even charge. If you're up stairs AND it has to go through the metal body of the car, plus the ceiling/floor of your house...nah.

You get a hell of a lot stronger field than that standing there watching your hot pocket get nuked in the microwave or jamming your cell phone in your ear 8 hours a day.


Wheres my Viper?
By Mitch101 on 4/5/2012 1:00:55 PM , Rating: 1
Yea yea where is the DT article on the 2013 Viper?




RE: Wheres my Viper?
By mephit13 on 4/5/2012 1:39:52 PM , Rating: 3
The point to this article is the new technology being added to the car, not the car itself. You’ll notice that there are no articles about the Nissan Sentra, and that’s because it’s pretty much the same car technology that’s being used in every other car. If Dodge makes a Viper with a mini-nuclear power plant for each wheel, or the ability to fly, or even just a hybrid version of it, I’m sure you’ll read about it here. If the next one is just a V-10 with 4 wheel drive and seatbelts, then you won’t.


RE: Wheres my Viper?
By arnold123 on 4/5/2012 2:10:07 PM , Rating: 2
True, this is a tech site and the viper is just a car with a v10 up front and 4 wheels, but i would rather look at the Viper than a ugly high tech electric car .


RE: Wheres my Viper?
By Spuke on 4/5/2012 4:01:56 PM , Rating: 1
I think this car looks pretty good though but, yeah, I'd rather drive a Viper. :)


RE: Wheres my Viper?
By Reclaimer77 on 4/5/12, Rating: 0
RE: Wheres my Viper?
By Ringold on 4/6/2012 9:31:19 AM , Rating: 2
26 year payback for the Volt, and that from an eco-warrior left-wing newspaper. Well, guess every once in a while their conscious demands honesty. :P


RE: Wheres my Viper?
By chrnochime on 4/5/2012 2:03:17 PM , Rating: 2
Go read at AB or IL or Jalop(shudder). The new viper is still powered by that huge lump with some internal changed out and block revised. Nothing ground-breaking overall. Heck it doesn't even have KERS.


RE: Wheres my Viper?
By Xplorer4x4 on 4/7/2012 5:27:02 AM , Rating: 2
You mean the 2013 Viper that looks almost exactly the same as it did when when it came out in 1992? Don't get me wrong, I like the Viper,but isn't it about time we see a new innovative design for the Viper?


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