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The changes to the NSA's surveillance programs will be announced at 11 a.m. (1600 GMT)

The U.S. National Security Agency's (NSA) surveillance programs are expected to see some big changes today, including the end of the NSA's handling of bulk telephone metadata.

According to a new report from Reuters, U.S. President Barack Obama will reveal the changes to the NSA's programs today at 11 a.m. (1600 GMT) at the Justice Department. 

Some of the changes expected are the elimination of the government's handling of bulk telephone metadata, and making a judicial finding required before looking to the database as a way of scaling back spying on American devices. 

Obama said the bulk data program could be necessary for countering terrorist attacks, but feels that it's important to find a comfortable balance between the use of this program and the privacy of American citizens. 

A presidential review panel suggested that bulk data be held by a third party (like telephone companies), but reports say Obama will not provide any specifics on who should hold the data today. 

While privacy advocates, Senate, and House Judiciary committees have all spoken out against the bulk metadata collection, the Intelligence committees of both the Senate and House have said they believed the telephone metadata program should stay the way it is. 

Back in December 2013, the presidential review panel made 46 recommendations regarding greater restraint on the NSA's surveillance programs, which will have to be accepted by President Barack Obama and U.S. Congress before being put into practice. The recommendations were submitted that same month. 
 

[SOURCE: theurbanpolitico.com]
 
One of the major recommendations involves the elimination of bulk collection of phone call records (known as "metadata"). The NSA said it collected metadata in bulk and filtered through it afterward in an attempt to make connections when searching for terrorist threats.

However, the panel said that this method of data collection hasn't proved to be more effective or beneficial than more targeted forms. It further stated that the program has made "modest" contributions at best, and that there's no proof the outcome would have been any different without the metadata bulk collection. 
 
The NSA has defended the bulk collection of metadata, saying it's necessary to keep the country safe. NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander even said it's the only way the NSA can "connect the dots." 

Another big recommendation from the panel was to conduct five tests before Washington decides to spy on foreign leaders: U.S. leaders should determine whether such surveillance is merited by major threats to national security; whether the other nation involved has leaders we should accord a high degree of respect and deference; whether there is reason to believe the foreign leader has been deceitful; whether there are other ways to obtain the information, and weigh the negative consequences if the surveillance were to become public knowledge. 
 
Yet another major recommendation is the limitation of on National Security Letters, which allow certain government agencies demand business records from both individuals and companies without any independent or judicial review. The panel said these letters should only be issued after a judicial review, and gag orders should also be limited.
 
The NSA has been under the microscope ever since former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked details about the NSA's secret spy programs to the media early last year. In August 2013, reports said that the NSA admitted to touching 1.6 percent of total globe Web traffic. Its technique was to filter data after harvesting it, which led to over-collection on a major scale. It was later revealed that Snowden conned between 20 to 25 NSA employees to give him their login credentials and passwords while working at the NSA regional operations center for a month in Hawaii last spring. Snowden reportedly told the NSA employees that he needed their passwords in order to do his job, and after downloading secret NSA documents, he leaked the information to the media.

Snowden told the media last month that his mission is complete after spending the last year leaking secret NSA documents. 

Source: Reuters



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Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 10:47:59 AM , Rating: 5
... He's just a talking head (and a secret Tyrant behind closed doors).

Just because they "reduce" storage of data... or "handling" doesn't mean the secret courts and secret warrants will stop. All it means is something convoluted will happen to make it seem less invasive but in the end, some new secret system will be put in place to keep violating all of us.

The only way to stop the NSA... is to end the NSA. We have the FBI and the CIA. Enough is enough! How many bureaucracies do we need to have?

Besides, Obamination can't stop the NSA. Only the Congress can. The Congress can de-fund the NSA.

I propose a simple solution: Take every dime we are giving to the NSA and... give it to NASA. We'll all be better off for it in the end.




RE: Blah blah blah...
By EasyC on 1/17/2014 10:52:53 AM , Rating: 4
I say, take every dime we give to politicians and apply it to anything but politicians.

Politics should be a service, not a career.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Flunk on 1/17/2014 11:25:18 AM , Rating: 5
I disagree, I think they should all be paid minimum wage. See where that gets us.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By japlha on 1/17/2014 12:53:33 PM , Rating: 2
I think they should get paid what the market dictates for whatever product or service they offer.
The money any government receives should not be coerced from its' citizens at the point of a gun and threat of imprisonment.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 1:07:15 PM , Rating: 2
They did away with debtors prisons some time ago. Sadly, they're coming back:

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/12/28/local-c...

And before all the Faux News haters start screaming:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/as-economy-flails-debt...


RE: Blah blah blah...
By ClownPuncher on 1/17/2014 2:47:41 PM , Rating: 3
Aw yea! It's like we are playing Tropico 3, but in real life!


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Just Tom on 1/19/2014 7:40:13 PM , Rating: 2
And how exactly would you fund the government? I am a small government guy but there needs to be some level of funding, if only for defense. How does one put an individual market value on national defense?


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Ammohunt on 1/17/14, Rating: 0
RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 11:26:48 AM , Rating: 5
They violate my principles, as an American. Piss on my Constitution and you piss on me. That's how.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Ammohunt on 1/17/14, Rating: -1
RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 3:16:01 PM , Rating: 3
I don't call speaking up for what I feel is an injustice. I'd go so far to say our Founding Fathers would think it is one, too.

The Government is not above the law, ever. Yet, we have many in power that think they are--especially in the NSA. Didn't you watch the 60 minutes episode that aired a few weeks ago? General Alexander and others spent the whole time lying to America with a straight face.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 3:16:48 PM , Rating: 2
Derp. "I don't call speaking up for what I feel is an injustice, childish."

Damn Chinese food. It is potent stuff. :)


RE: Blah blah blah...
By AssBall on 1/17/2014 11:32:15 AM , Rating: 2
If you don't feel violated, does that mean you like it?


RE: Blah blah blah...
By amanojaku on 1/17/2014 11:33:15 AM , Rating: 3
"I'm afraid to be alone."

"Why?"

"Because he... He always peeks at me."

"Who does?"

"Uncle..."

"Uncle?"

"Uncle Sam."


RE: Blah blah blah...
By ForumMaster on 1/17/2014 11:55:17 AM , Rating: 2
Blank statements like this are idiotic. While the NSA may have indeed gone overboard, saying that it is useless, is stupid.
By its very nature, everything they do is classified so the average citizen can't appreciate what the NSA prevents (terrorism).

You only hear about an terror act. You never know about that terror plots that were foiled. And while this may sound like an excuse, it is true.

Hell, I'm not even American (so i get ass probed even more) and i recognize that). Despite what some people think, all government intel agencies do this, and it is necessary to a certain extent.

We don't live in a Utopia and we do have global jihad organizations like Al-Qaeda. Staying a step ahead of them sometimes requires taking steps we wouldn't want to take otherwise. But these steps save lives.

Which do you prefer?


RE: Blah blah blah...
By nafhan on 1/17/2014 12:18:01 PM , Rating: 3
Actually, the NSA has admitted that no serious terror plots were foiled by their illegal data collection efforts. The ones they did "foil" were terror plots that wouldn't have existed without the NSA/FBI instigating them from start to finish.

More importantly, the NSA's mission isn't to prevent the poorly defined global threat of "terror". It's a part of the department of defense whose mission is ostensibly to protect US citizens from outside forces. Violating US law to collect data on all (or nearly all) US citizens for little benefit doesn't seem to support that mission very well.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By flatrock on 1/17/2014 12:39:08 PM , Rating: 1
The NSA didn't admit to anything. The panel investigating the NSA's practices didn't call the data collection efforts illegal, and while the said they didn't directly lead to stopping many terrorist plots, they did reccoment continuing the program but to have the data kept by the telephone companies instead of the NSA (which is a rather meaningless distinction since the requirements for getting a court order for the data aren't changing).

The metadata is used to find possible connections for people who might be involved. It helps them develop possible leads. The reporter who did an investigation and said that because it was only mentioned in public documents regarding two court cases is either an idiot, or was trying to mislead people. The program finds leads. It's not going to produce evidence that is going to be useful in court. It may lead to such information, but it would most likely lead them to enough data to then get a warrant with which they could gather the actual evidence.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By nafhan on 1/17/2014 4:05:06 PM , Rating: 2
"Nope, nope, that's not illegal! We've got a secret law that says so!" That's the point where the difference between legal and illegal becomes completely academic. Secret laws that circumvent the non-secret laws kind of defeats the whole point of representative government.

I also find "it's really helpful, but you'll have to trust us on that" to not be a very convincing argument.

Personally, I'd rather have slightly less national security, and not live in a police surveillance state. I gather you're on the other side of that fence, though.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By flatrock on 1/21/2014 11:52:18 AM , Rating: 2
None of the laws are secret. The basis is Smith v Maryland which ruled that we have no reasonable expectation of privacy regarding metadata held by third parties. The original context was a telephone pen register, but unless restricted by law or additional judicial rulings that narrow the scope it applies to similar things.

Congress responded to that ruling with the Pen Register Act, which placed some legal restrictions on pen registers since the court ruled there weren't any constitutional restrictions. The restrictions in the Pen Register Act are kind of a farce. All the government needs to do is say the data is related to an ongoing investigation in order to get a court order. It's an incredibly low legal barrier and even if they lie any evidence collected is still admissible because it's not a constitutional violation.
The PATRIOT Act clarified that the pen register act should apply to electronic communications. That merely clarified in law what the government was already doing, and since the Pen Register Act was such a pitiful excuse for legal restrictions on the government it was more of a clarification that the government had no intent to respect the privacy of such metadata.

This legal and privacy rights issue has been going on for decades. The fact that the Patriot Act expanded the meaning of a pen register got some media attention as well.

Just because the general public didn't bother to try to understand what rights advocates were telling them or for that matter care as long as they thought only other people would be targeted by a pen register, doesn't make these things secret.

There are courts who's rulings are classified. There are also normal criminal courts who's rulings are sealed at least for a time, so the FISA court isn't as special in that respect as people seem to think. However, the FISA court's rulings aren't really inconsistent with other courts, and it actually appears that they made an effort to place additional restrictions on the NSA over what the laws explicitly dictate.

quote:
Personally, I'd rather have slightly less national security, and not live in a police surveillance state. I gather you're on the other side of that fence, though.


Not really. I think Smith v Maryland was an absolutely horrible ruling, and I think that Congressmen claiming to be surprised and upset about the NSA programs, yet aren't proposing new legislation are either deceitful, or complete morons.

The administration saying they will make some mostly cosmetic changes will change nothing. The lack of legal and constitutional protections remains. The government has the exact same authority, and we are still in a position of trusting them not to abuse it.

Whining about illegal acts by the NSA is counterproductive. The simple fact is that they aren't illegal, and unless the courts change the precedent they aren't unconstitutional either. We can argue over if they should be constitutional all we want, but according to that same Constitution the Supreme Court's opinion is the one that matters.

We need to be harassing Congress into legislating additional protections for our data that is in third party hands. We also need to hope that some of the appeals make it to the Supreme Court and that this effort by the administration isn't enough to derail the appeals.

The intelligence community is actually a very law abiding group of people. The requirements for attaining and retaining their clearances make it very unlikely that they will be otherwise, though there will always be a small number of exceptions. What is getting lost in the coverage of these issues is that the NSA is generally performing their duties as best they can within the bounds of the law and the constitution. It's the law and the interpretation of the Constitution that are broken.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Schrag4 on 1/17/2014 12:22:51 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Blank statements like this are idiotic. While the NSA may have indeed gone overboard, saying that it is useless, is stupid.


Nowhere did he say the NSA is "useless." We as Americans just don't like the use - treating everyone like criminals.

quote:
You only hear about an terror act. You never know about that terror plots that were foiled. And while this may sound like an excuse, it is true.


Hmm. You know what else they're hiding from the public? The abuses, whether individuals at the NSA check up on their ex-spouses or whether administrations employ them to find dirt on their political enemies. There's just too much potential for abuse, IMO.

quote:
...Staying a step ahead of them sometimes requires taking steps we wouldn't want to take otherwise. But these steps save lives.

Which do you prefer?


If my choices are to have the govt spy on me like I'm a criminal without a reason and have a one-in-a-billion chance of being killed in a terrorist attack, or leave me alone and have a one-in-a-million chance of being killed in a terrorist attack, I prefer privacy and freedom.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By majorpain on 1/17/2014 12:33:33 PM , Rating: 2
"If my choices are to have the govt spy on me like I'm a criminal without a reason and have a one-in-a-billion chance of being killed in a terrorist attack, or leave me alone and have a one-in-a-million chance of being killed in a terrorist attack, I prefer privacy and freedom. "

Says it all. Thanks Sir!


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Ammohunt on 1/17/2014 2:23:21 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
...and have a one-in-a-million chance of being killed in a terrorist attack, I prefer privacy and freedom.


What are your chances without the NSA doing their job?


RE: Blah blah blah...
By majorpain on 1/17/2014 2:48:00 PM , Rating: 2
Read all his post... its there. And "their job" is a very questionable lie!


RE: Blah blah blah...
By ClownPuncher on 1/17/2014 2:56:10 PM , Rating: 2
I dunno. Ask the Boston Marathon runners.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Schrag4 on 1/17/2014 10:59:40 PM , Rating: 2
Amen. The Russians warned us about the Tsarnaev brothers, but we ignored their warnings. The NSA was going strong in the timeframe that the brothers planned their attack. I suppose that means that the NSA might not be making us as safe as they claim they are.

What people need to realize is that while leadership claims that the NSA acts in the interest of national security (to fight terrorism), it's mainly being used as a tool to snare citizens breaking US laws - nothing to do with terrorism. It's a blatant violation of the constitution, and everyone knows it.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By nafhan on 1/17/2014 4:15:18 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
What are your chances without the NSA doing their job?
I'll bite. What's their job?

Let's call their job "foreign signals intelligence + spying on America for Americans". Then let's say instead of outright quitting they just changed their "job" to exclude the spying on Americans part. In that case, I'd say it's somewhat likely that their effectiveness at "stopping terror" might not go down much.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Reclaimer77 on 1/17/2014 4:40:13 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
You only hear about an terror act. You never know about that terror plots that were foiled. And while this may sound like an excuse, it is true.


I'm tired of this bullshit, and I never thought I would say that, because I used to say this bullshit myself.

But I'm sorry, it's time to put up or shut up. Show the American people all these "plots" that spying on us has foiled. And don't give me that classified nonsense. If a plot is foiled, then it can't hurt anyone in informing us it's been foiled.

This isn't the goddamn Cold War, and nobody is trying to park 'nukes in Cuba anymore. The NSA is absolutely useless unless YOU can prove otherwise.

quote:
Staying a step ahead of them sometimes requires taking steps we wouldn't want to take otherwise. But these steps save lives.


These NSA programs wouldn't have even stopped 911. To say nothing of smaller attacks like Boston.

So what's it good for? Tell me!!


RE: Blah blah blah...
By bitmover461 on 1/20/2014 9:15:52 AM , Rating: 2
You probably think TSA is doing a bang up job too. Statistically, they are doing no better a job than the FAA, for 10x the cost.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Spuke on 1/17/2014 12:09:17 PM , Rating: 2
The FBI and CIA don't do electronic intelligence. The FBI doesn't even do intelligence, they're responsible for federal law enforcement. Sounds like you need a course on how the government operates. No wonder the same idiots keep getting re-elected. Dumb sh!ts like you don't even know how things work.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By flatrock on 1/17/2014 12:31:12 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know where you got that idea. The FBI, CIA, NSA, DEA, Secret Service, and Military, as well as State and Local law enforcement all do electronic intelligence gathering of some sort.

They have their own areas of primary responsibility. The FBI handles most domestic federal investigations. Drug enforcement primarily falls to the DEA.

The NSA and CIA are the ones likely to be gathering intelligence that isn't directly related to law enforcement, though the military does some as well to analyze foreign threats.

How do you think law enforcement gather's evidence in this increasingly digital world. Evidence is just a subset of intelligence data that is used in criminal proceedings.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Spuke on 1/17/2014 12:41:02 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I don't know where you got that idea. The FBI, CIA, NSA, DEA, Secret Service, and Military, as well as State and Local law enforcement all do electronic intelligence gathering of some sort.
I'm not talking the use of tech to do your job, I'm talking about MISSIONS. The NSA's MISSION is electronic intelligence. The LAPD's MISSION is NOT electronic intelligence. You know exactly what I meant.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By AssBall on 1/17/2014 12:59:17 PM , Rating: 2
Their missions are now vague and overlapping, or else or and in addition to that, they have completely extended themselves far beyond the parameters of the "mission".

The secret service and BATF are about as bloated and corrupt of examples as there are.

Government has too many employees operating under the presumption that they are there "to protect our liberty". The opposite is as often the case.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By flatrock on 1/17/2014 12:31:38 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know where you got that idea. The FBI, CIA, NSA, DEA, Secret Service, and Military, as well as State and Local law enforcement all do electronic intelligence gathering of some sort.

They have their own areas of primary responsibility. The FBI handles most domestic federal investigations. Drug enforcement primarily falls to the DEA.

The NSA and CIA are the ones likely to be gathering intelligence that isn't directly related to law enforcement, though the military does some as well to analyze foreign threats.

How do you think law enforcement gather's evidence in this increasingly digital world. Evidence is just a subset of intelligence data that is used in criminal proceedings.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 1:02:32 PM , Rating: 2
The reason they keep getting re-elected is because of fucktards like yourself who care more about their fancy BMWs and physical possessions keep voting for them. Sway a few trinkets in front of the hogs and they'll forget everything.

I guarantee you I'm quite a bit smarter than you'll ever be (which isn't saying a lot on an internet forum like this).

The CIA most certainly does all sorts of intelligence, both physical and electronic. They're the Central Intelligence Agency for crying out loud. Of COURSE they do electronic surveillance!

We don't need a complete agency who's sole job is to spy on all information when we already have one who's job was to spy on everything... to begin with. The NSA is redundant and it has more than exceeded its powers.

They should be shut down and the Patriot act should be repealed.

You know, Dailytech has always been a place of intense debate but recently it seems the level of asinine behavior has grown exponentially. I find myself even being drawn into it and it is downright embarassing.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By AssBall on 1/17/2014 2:23:06 PM , Rating: 2
Spuke took an argument about how government agencies are "supposed to work" and tried to applied it to a discussion on how the government is actually working. Well, surprise! It doesn't apply Then he insulted you just for good measure. The final crutch of a master debater.

Don't throw all the DT readership under the bus because of a few useless poorly thought out comments.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 2:27:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Don't throw all the DT readership under the bus because of a few useless poorly thought out comments.


Well said. :)

I suppose the heightened vitriol lately has taken me aback. As you put it--there tend to be just a narrow margin of readers washing us all with it.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By jwdR1 on 1/17/2014 2:34:22 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe we should just stop paying taxes...as it is, we're not getting our money's worth...not even from NASA. :(

Congress may be able to withhold money from NSA but we need to withhold the money from Congress too! :)


RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 4:04:29 PM , Rating: 3
Hmm, not a bad idea. Instead of mailing in a check to the IRS, mail them an "I'm sorry," letter.

Then mail the check you were going to mail to NASA. :)

I wish that'd go over well. Ruby Ridge conjures up bad memories.

Help. We're being repressed! :(


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Solandri on 1/17/2014 4:25:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Hmm, not a bad idea. Instead of mailing in a check to the IRS, mail them an "I'm sorry," letter.

Mail them a letter saying, "I'm sorry but my accountant is protesting my budget and refusing to finish my taxes until I promise to change how I spend my money. I will mail you my tax payment as soon as this impasse is resolved. I'm sure you understand; I heard you a similar problem last year."


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Reclaimer77 on 1/17/2014 4:43:53 PM , Rating: 3
Obama must be the only person who can speak for almost 45 minutes and not actually say anything or DO anything. It's uncanny.

How many more years of this jackass? (no pun the Democrat party symbol is literally a jackass, go figure)


RE: Blah blah blah...
By MrBlastman on 1/17/2014 11:09:36 PM , Rating: 2
He's really good at looking up into the air while turning his head right and left though!

>:(


RE: Blah blah blah...
By Reclaimer77 on 1/18/2014 9:13:48 AM , Rating: 2
True. Although his biggest skill is looking DOWN on everyone.


RE: Blah blah blah...
By KFZ on 1/18/2014 1:53:09 PM , Rating: 2
I don't buy into an analogous perspective that America has this problem with "rogue" agencies like the IRS, NSA or ATF who occasionally run afoul of us citizens and damage the sacred integrity the government vies to uphold and risks harming our fragile relationship to it. What a load of crap.

Time and again, with what tips of the iceberg the great ship America does scrape alongside, we're lucky if the "bridge" even admits that someone up there caused an accident, let alone does something useful to rectify it.

No one important is held accountable.
No outside authority stops the runaway cruise ship.
No one gets on the bridge.
And no matter what our tickets say, these authoritarian mad men and their cronies take matters into their own hands to watch our every move, treat most of us like criminals and control our destiny.

I'm not interested in stopping the NSA. I'm not foolish enough to believe that Congress is reliable or that defunding a massive agency will fix anything. I want to get everyone together, break down the iron door and figure out how to start turning this thing around so we can go where WE want our ship to sail.


The Boy Who Cried Wolf
By SAN-Man on 1/17/2014 2:11:44 PM , Rating: 2
"I'm going to close GITMO within 1 year" NEVER HAPPENED.

"I'm going to end Iraq and Afghanistan with 2 years" NEVER HAPPENED.

"Legislation will be posted online before it's voted on" NEVER HAPPENED.

"I am going to be the most transparent President ever" NEVER HAPPENED (well actually, this did happen as most of us see right through him at this point).

"I'm going to end NSA spying" WILL NEVER HAPPEN.




RE: The Boy Who Cried Wolf
By CowKing on 1/17/2014 3:00:36 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
"I am going to be the most transparent President ever"


Well, as far as US presidents go, yes, he has been the most transparent president. He's just not transparent enough as we would all like.


RE: The Boy Who Cried Wolf
By SAN-Man on 1/17/2014 3:05:06 PM , Rating: 2
More transparent than George Washington? Yeah right. You're an apologist. Hit the bricks.


RE: The Boy Who Cried Wolf
By ritualm on 1/17/2014 3:39:19 PM , Rating: 2
The sarcasm in the previous post literally flew over your head.

Obama is the most transparent President in the sense that he never did what he said would do.


RE: The Boy Who Cried Wolf
By SAN-Man on 1/17/2014 7:03:20 PM , Rating: 2
On the contrary, I believe mine flew over yours. :)


By flatrock on 1/17/2014 12:19:54 PM , Rating: 2
So now we have the President proposing to fix the problem by making a change that will make no significant difference.

The legal basis and process for collecting the data from the telephone companies isn't changing. It required a court order for the government to gather the metadata in the first place and the same process remains. Since they are only doing thousands of searches on the database a year, it seems practical for them to gather the data from the telecos as needed rather than store the data themselves. However, the telecos will be required to hold on to the data, and they will still be required to hand over the data when given a court order, and the standard for getting the court order isn't changing. All they have to do is state that they have a reasonable belief that the data is relevant to an investigation, and developing possible leads apparently meets that standard.
So instead of having a duplicate database, they will end up paying the telecos to perform searches of their databases for them.

If you want to protect privacy we need legislation that forces the telecos to keep this data private and changes the legal standard for when the government can demand it.




By Spuke on 1/17/2014 12:43:05 PM , Rating: 2
Since when is a court order not legal?


Fighting for "us"
By Chaser on 1/17/2014 2:09:22 PM , Rating: 2
Once again our Messiah, campaigner in chief, the man looking out "for us" stands up against the evil, intrusive government.

Dropping to me knees, "Thank you so much for being there for us!" Where would we be without you?




Still violates the 4th Amendment
By LBID on 1/17/2014 3:06:48 PM , Rating: 2
At no point in that speech did I see anything about requiring WARRANTS for investigations of US citizens. He mentioned "court oversight" and "court involvement", but that is vague and can be any kind of drummed up secret court the government might care to enact. If you gather intelligence on a citizen without a proper warrant for suspicion of a crime, then you are violating the Constitution. It's that simple.




Summary of his speech
By ScotterQX6700 on 1/18/2014 11:00:20 AM , Rating: 2
"I feel your pain. Let me tell you the ways... So: I will most likely probably ask some friends of mine to think about talking about a plan some time in the future to make a few smallish changes to the way we are gathering, recording, storing, and acting upon your private data that we are forcing- I mean asking tech companies to steal- I mean borrow for us from normal Americans who obey- I mean support their government. Oh and we'll also definitely talk about how there should be ways to make some of our supersecret snooping- I mean intelligence gathering more transparent to the public but not really because of boogeymen- I mean aliens- I mean godzilla- I mean- terrorists that I need to remind you are scary and dangerous."?




Liar
By talikarni on 1/18/2014 6:47:06 PM , Rating: 2
Take anything he says and either apply the opposite, or expect it never gets done and the blatant Constitutional violations continue.




Stop The Hatin'
By bitmover461 on 1/20/2014 9:12:17 AM , Rating: 2
Hey, he just said if you like your privacy, you can keep it. What's the problem?




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