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PinkVisual is looking to out innovate filesharers, rather than sue them.
Company says they don't like illegal downloads, but acknowledges that they're reality and unlikely to go away

At one time, digital video was viewed as a titillating fantasy to the heads of the porn industry.  Now used and abused by those who illegally download, porn studios wish desperately for a means of release from the rough bondage of file sharing.

But even as Vivid Entertainment and Larry Flynt Publications have looked to whip internet users into line with thousands of lawsuits in recent months, a smaller porn firm is looking to achieve deeper market penetration with a different approach.

Up-and-comer PinkVisual's CEO Quentin Boyer discusses in an interview with CNET the hard reality of piracy and his company's plan to get on top by offering customers pleasure rather than the pain of lawsuits.

He states, "You've had a lot of companies, both in mainstream and adult entertainment, who've been kind of stubborn on the question of access and convenience. They want people consuming their content the way the companies want it consumed. They want to monetize it the way they want to. About two years ago we began to see that as a losing battle."

He elaborates on his plans to give customers more bang for their buck, stating, "A consumer who will come onto the Internet and buy adult content is someone who wants access and convenience. At the end of the day, lots of people provide the same kind of content. So, how do I differentiate myself as an adult-content producer? I give them better technology, better user experience, and better price point."

He believes that some of those naughty pirates may become paying customers.  He comments:

Part of our thinking is that you don't really benefit from bickering [or] by pointing fingers at the large user base that's out there. Setting aside for a second the question of whether some of them are ripping your content from a DVD and uploading it to the torrents, what do I have to gain by ostracizing this huge group of people, which is a mixed bag of people who might be willing to purchase and people who will never purchase?

I certainly understand the frustration that rights holders feel. We experience the same frustration. But at some point you have to be pragmatic and say, "OK piracy is a fact of life. It's been there for a long time. Now what?"

The issue of piracy is certainly a challenging one for any content provider, but PinkVisual is one of a growing number of indie film, gaming, and adult entertainment studios to argue you don't have to be hardcore about piracy to score new business.

It's better to find new ways to please the customers, at the end of the day says Mr. Boyer, adding, "[But] who knows, we could be wrong."





"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)













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