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Print 7 comment(s) - last by hiscross.. on Apr 9 at 9:43 AM

The Pentagon has invested $100M in the past six months to keep it safe from cyber attack

Military leaders recently disclosed information saying the Pentagon has spent upwards of $100 million to defend the country against cyber attacks from domestic and overseas computer threats.

"The important thing is that we recognized that we are under assault from the least sophisticated -- what I would say the bored teenager -- all the way up to the sophisticated nation-state, with some pretty criminal elements sandwiched in-between," said Air Force Gen. Kevin Chilton, director of the U.S. Strategic Command.  "This is indeed our big challenge, as we think about how to defend it."

Strategic Command is in charge of defending the Pentagon from cyber attacks that range from vandalism and harmless scanning to cyber espionage.

The government invested the money in necessary manpower, contractors and computer technology to fix cyber security issues related to internal mistakes and external attacks.  Officials elected not to disclose how much of the money was spent to fix the system from outside attack, but cyber security is a growing issue among politicians lately.

Pentagon computers are scanned by outsiders millions of times every day, which is becoming increasingly dangerous as there are more reports of possible government-led attacks from China and Eastern Europe.

China recently deflected concern regarding cyber espionage from western nations, who blame the country for attacking government computers in the United States, United Kingdom, Japan, and numerous other countries.

China was recently blamed for the creation and use of GhostNet, a government-operated system that hacked secure computers in 103 nations, compromising a total of 1,300 computers.  Furthermore, GhostNet targeted banks, financial institutions, foreign embassies, media outlets, and the Dalai Lama.



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..... about time
By Moishe on 4/8/2009 9:52:46 AM , Rating: 2
They should have been doing this a few years ago, but I'm glad they're starting now.

There needs to be a real effort and a lot of money into securing networks AND disabling the attackers.




RE: ..... about time
By Ringold on 4/8/2009 10:42:23 AM , Rating: 1
Indeed. This was also a little disconcerting:

http://www.cnbc.com//id/30105115

Nothing networked to the wider internet will be entirely safe. I endorse the Galactica approach. :P

And I'm not referring to letting a hot Russian or Chinese wench work for the DoD on various CNC programs.


RE: ..... about time
By Ammohunt on 4/8/2009 2:16:44 PM , Rating: 2
They should take $250k of that and hire Gary Mckinnon since he is the single person most familiar with the Pentagons network.


RE: ..... about time
By DigitalFreak on 4/8/2009 3:35:13 PM , Rating: 3
Yeah. I get my underwear at K-Mart. Yeah.


RE: ..... about time
By Chemical Chris on 4/8/2009 3:54:09 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed, if an average guy (ok, a bit of a loner/geek with aspergers autism) can break into the pentagon and totally shred its defences with nothing more than a 28.8Kb (not even 56k!!!) modem, then your security is not credible, and you should hire the 'hacker' asap.
Poor ol' Gary, he was just looking for proof of the US covering up UFO's. And defeated a $500 million cyber defense employed by the pentagon. Never says if he found the proof, but still, very embarassing for the pentagon. And further proof of bloated military spending not actually buying security, but being lost to corruption and incompetence. Which is probably why they are so intent on prosecuting.
So if one curious geek can shatter the pentagons cyber security, I dont have much faith that they can defend against a motivated, large-scale intrusion attempt (a la China, Russia).
Yes, I know no system is 'hack-proof', but it would be nice if it were secured. Last I read, there were over 100 unsecured (externally accessible) access points to the secure military network....so all one would have to do is gain access to the open comp, then could get access to the supposedly secure military network. Not that Im competent enough to do anything like that, but I do recognize that it is much easier than it should be, and doable by most professionals in the field.

ChemC


RE: ..... about time
By hiscross on 4/9/2009 9:43:23 AM , Rating: 2
You have no idea what you are taking about. Your comments are absolutely stupid at best. The Pentagon may have issues, but without them I hope you enjoy slavery, because that is what will happen to America. Heck, they way things are headed we are inching closer to that day-by-day. Of course that is the change thing that was voted into office.


Pic is...real?
By Morphine06 on 4/8/2009 10:56:15 AM , Rating: 2
I can't believe the picture isn't from Wargames. I'm slightly disappointed.

They must be spending this money on disconnecting open phone lines attached to missile control and sealing up the man-sized air ducts at NORAD.




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