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Despite promising smart phones and a new contract with Verizon, Palm has continued to struggle this quarter. It did, however have some good news -- an update that will enabe video recording and Flash on the Palm Pre.  (Source: Palm via VentureBeat)
The veteran smart phone maker continues to struggle

Palm was on a sharp slide over the last couple years, thanks in part to the rising success of Research In Motion's Blackberry smartphones and the Apple iPhone.  That's a foreign position for the company, as it was on the forefront of the smartphone revolution, releasing one the Treo 180 back in 2002 (five years before the first iPhone).  As the PDA market vanished and was replaced with smartphones, Palm was beat by faster competitors in the race it helped launch.

Recently, though, Palm looked to turn things around with the release of the Palm Pre and Palm Pixi smartphones which are powered by its latest operating system, webOS.  It also scored a deal with Verizon, America's largest carrier.  Despite this big boost, it delivered some disappointing news this week; it forecasted a revenue of between $300M to $320M USD in its fiscal third quarter that ends this month.  That's well below the $424.7M USD average analysts estimated.

The weaker than expected revenue was a result of poorer than expected sales.  Palm is predicted to only move 750,000 smartphone units in the quarter, down from the average analyst estimate of 1 million units.  As a result of the bad news, Palm stock plunged over 24 percent in busy trading today and yesterday.

Part of Palm's problem is that Verizon hasn't aggressively marketed the Palm Pre and has been much more vocal about its Android phones.  Some think that Palm's poor performance may sink a prospective deal with America's number 2 carrier, AT&T, which announced earlier in the year than it would carry two Palm smartphones (likely the Pre and Pixi) in the first half of this year.

Palm CEO Jon Rubinstein moved quickly to reassure employees, sending a company wide letter stating that he feels the firm will soon turn the corner, thanks to the Verizon deal.  In the letter he details plans to send 200 "Brand Ambassadors" to Verizon stores nationwide in the U.S. to help push Palm's smartphones.  He also points out that Palm does have a cash stockpile of $500M USD, which it can use to survive during a few rocky quarters.

The company also reported some good news for its smartphone customers -- a new webOS update for the Palm Pre and Palm Pixi will air today.  The update, webOS 1.4, will be initially available from Sprint only, but expect Verizon to soon follow shortly.  The update is packed with goodies, from bug fixes, to video capture and editing.  Among its best additions, though, is the inclusion of an early build of Adobe's Flash 10.  Having Flash gives it access to the internet's wealth of Flash apps and games, a catalog rivaling even the Apple App store's.  And while some of the apps may not be well suited for Palm's screen resolution, they do enjoy the advantage of being largely free (ad revenue supported).

Despite the bad news, the overall picture is that Palm may be down, but it's by no means out of the smartphone race.



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Out
By DigitalFreak on 2/26/2010 12:48:10 PM , Rating: 2
Android will eventually spell the end of Palm. Aside from Apple, they're the only one that control both the OS and hardware, which limits the number of devices. Palm doesn't have the rabid fan base that Apple has.




RE: Out
By djc208 on 2/26/2010 1:31:14 PM , Rating: 5
The problem with Android though is that because it's open they have to watch it does not fracture into a confusing mess. How long till you have 12 different versions with various levels of features and capabilities scattered across various phones. For instance the Nexus one got multi-touch but for a while it wasn't clear if the Droid would.

Not that I love the Apple model, but one advantage is that it's a consistent OS that currently all their phones can handle.

Palm's problem is that the WebOS features aren't improved enough to justify moving from an iPhone without a decent app store, and that just isn't there, nor will it probably get there with Android the new rising star. Hence the push for Flash.

They didn't help their case with those wierd commercials with the freaky looking women spouting confusing diatribes that seemed almost unrelated to what they were selling and why you wanted it.


RE: Out
By rudy on 2/26/2010 1:47:00 PM , Rating: 3
If you look at the past development of computers it started as an open system then it moved toward a closed platform then after that went to standardized software on open hardware. I thin the same thing will happen with phones and the only question is who will be the top dog or will anyone? Google, microsoft, symbian or others? But I do not think apple or palme can continue with their anorexic lineups. And I also expect Nokia and motorola to make a resurgence when the move to smart phones gets old who can manufacture capable devices at low costs comes back into play.


RE: Out
By Solandri on 2/26/2010 4:35:11 PM , Rating: 2
You're thinking of the desktop OS market, where Microsoft used its dominant market position to bully out competitors.

In the server OS market, there was no dominant player. Initially it was a balkanized mess with nearly everyone and their brother selling a proprietary OS or Unix variant. Eventually, most settled on open source Linux and BSD Unix, with a few scattered proprietary OSes (e.g. Solaris) still around but diminishing in market share.

The real question I think is, do you need backwards compatibility with your phone apps? Personally I do because I was a PDA nut. But the vast majority of people seem to have no problem switching their phones every 1-2 years. So the OS and the apps available on it probably don't matter to them like they do on desktop PCs.

quote:
And I also expect Nokia and motorola to make a resurgence when the move to smart phones gets old who can manufacture capable devices at low costs comes back into play.

I don't think that's ever going to happen. Instead, what I'm seeing is smart phones whose sophisticated capabilities are hidden behind a simple or slick interface. People aren't going to see much difference in ease of use between those and low-cost phones. And with most of the price difference hidden in monthly usage fees, there isn't going to be much up-front cost difference either.

I really think the old phone-which-is-only-a-phone is dead. Even if you aren't a PDA nut like me, there are certain modern gadgets which nearly everyone likes to have and would prefer to carry with them everywhere. A digital camera, an MP3 player, a portable game/video player, a GPS. Combine these with a phone and you essentially have a smartphone. I really do think this convergence to a single portable device with all this functionality is going to continue.


RE: Out
By Atheist Icon on 2/26/2010 5:51:11 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
I really think the old phone-which-is-only-a-phone is dead.


For some that would be true. I currently have and love my Sanyo S1. It makes and recieves calls, thats it...and damn near bullet proof. I have no need to carry a GPS, Camera, Internet Browser, MP3 player, etc., with me at all.

There are alot of cool phones out there. I was trying to use my wifes PalmPre, ehh. Same with a buddy of mine's iPhone and Droid. Do not see the point in them.

My favorite phone was my Sanyo 4930, had it for 4 years, then I picked up my S1.


RE: Out
By themaster08 on 2/27/2010 2:31:43 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I don't think that's ever going to happen. Instead, what I'm seeing is smart phones whose sophisticated capabilities are hidden behind a simple or slick interface. People aren't going to see much difference in ease of use between those and low-cost phones.

One of the main reasons that Nokia is still the market leader is because they are one of the very few companies that still offer cost effective, single purpose mobile phones to third world and developing countries.

Even in developed countries like the US and here in the UK, there are millions of people that will only ever want a mobile phone for the sole purpose of making calls.

Now most manufacturers have shifted all of their efforts onto smartphones, Nokia are still making providing in a market that has been more or less neglected by everyone else.

quote:
And with most of the price difference hidden in monthly usage fees, there isn't going to be much up-front cost difference either.

Not everyone wants to be tied down to a contract, but the prices of sim-free smartphones is exorbitant.

This is another place where companies like Nokia excell. They also offer cost effective (albeit less glamorous) smartphones that are capable of anything an iPhone, Palm Pre or Android-based smartphones are capable of, without the ridiculous price tag.

Whilst their high-end smartphones are a jumbled up mess at the moment, my point is that Nokia target a much wider demograph than any other mobile phone manufacturer, and I feel one day this will come back to bite those other manufacturers in the ass.


RE: Out
By Diesel Donkey on 2/26/2010 8:35:31 PM , Rating: 5
I'm curious to know if you've actually tried a Pre for any length of time. In my opinion, the multitasking alone is reason enough to move to the platform. On my Pre I regularly have multiple cards open at once, and I can switch between them instantaneously. No longer do I have to close my e-mail composition screen out so that I can look something up online that I want to include in my message. I will admit that the OS can feel rather slow sometimes on the current hardware, but the combination of multitasking, excellent notifications system, and beautiful and efficient UI more than make up for any lack in speed.

On a different subject, I am really, really tired of hearing about "apps". Does anybody even know what they're saying when they demand more apps? What apps? Without any downloads, my Pre (and many other smartphones including my Treo before it) can make calls, send e-mails (with full Exchange integration), browse the web (a GREAT experience with webOS here), use Google Maps with the GPS, get turn-by-turn directions, create task lists, write memos, take pictures, listen to music, and watch videos. Just how many other things are there that people want to do with a smartphone? Clearly making fart noises is a big one, though for the life of me I don't know why. Then there are games, but already Palm seems to be surpassing Android in that area. Beyond that most every app is just internet content that's been repackaged. Certainly there are some truly useful applications like Epocrates and such, but for the most part I think people want apps because Apple has lots of them, so they must be important. Gotta have those 8,000 tip calculators!

I should say that I have found SOME apps extremely useful when paired with the innovative notification system in webOS. I have a Twitter app, a news app, and an RSS reader that alert me to updates in a most unintrusive and useful way. If they gave me updates like those on an iPhone, however, they would drive me crazy.


RE: Out
By Diesel Donkey on 2/26/2010 8:43:21 PM , Rating: 5
Woops, I left out calender, IM, and contacts usage. webOS pulls contacts info from Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Exchange. The same goes for the calender. It's cloud storage at its best.


RE: Out
By sxr7171 on 2/27/2010 2:59:37 PM , Rating: 2
I use an iPhone 3GS but I have no qualms saying that the Pre is actually a superior phone. It reacts and responds to user input as well as the iPhone. It multitasks. But its interface is superior to the iPhone's. So well thought out and ergonomic. While iPhone makes you stretch your finger all the way to the upper left and right hand corner and makes you press a button located in the worst place (should be on the side of the phone) the Pre never makes your finger leave the bottom of the screen to do anything.

It's really well thought out, very smooth and ahead of Android with no doubt in terms of interface.

The problem is that they partnered with the worst carrier. There STILL is no GSM variant in the US and its hard to find imported GSM versions (as opposed to Nokia where you can buy any of their models either at the Nokia store or almost any online store).

The big problem in the US is how much power we give to carriers. Everything is launched through a carrier and they dictate when you can release versions that work on other networks.

I'm not very fond of the Pre's slider, but otherwise it is also the superior phone to hold in one's hand.

What they need for me is to implement Exchange server search and to make a better designed hardware implementation. I tell you if they put that OS on something like a Nokia E66 design I would never touch an iPhone again. Also a home screen card would be nice - just a place to glance at your appointments and tasks. But the notifications on it are second to none.

It truly takes the "iPhone revolution" to the next level. Nobody has even come close to that yet, not Google/HTC/SE/Nokia.

It would truly sadden me if anything were to happen to Palm. It wold also reinforce my belief that American consumers would not know a good thing if it bit them in the ass. They only go for hype and marketing. PT Barnum was right.


RE: Out
By DCstewieG on 3/1/2010 11:10:58 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
It reacts and responds to user input as well as the iPhone.

As a Pre and iPod Touch owner...no, no it doesn't. When I use the iPod, it's easy to forget nothing is physically moving. The instant response and smoothness of scrolling is amazing. The Pre has neither of those, which is especially disappointing since its hardware is better than my 1st gen Touch.


RE: Out
By sxr7171 on 2/27/2010 2:59:53 PM , Rating: 2
I use an iPhone 3GS but I have no qualms saying that the Pre is actually a superior phone. It reacts and responds to user input as well as the iPhone. It multitasks. But its interface is superior to the iPhone's. So well thought out and ergonomic. While iPhone makes you stretch your finger all the way to the upper left and right hand corner and makes you press a button located in the worst place (should be on the side of the phone) the Pre never makes your finger leave the bottom of the screen to do anything.

It's really well thought out, very smooth and ahead of Android with no doubt in terms of interface.

The problem is that they partnered with the worst carrier. There STILL is no GSM variant in the US and its hard to find imported GSM versions (as opposed to Nokia where you can buy any of their models either at the Nokia store or almost any online store).

The big problem in the US is how much power we give to carriers. Everything is launched through a carrier and they dictate when you can release versions that work on other networks.

I'm not very fond of the Pre's slider, but otherwise it is also the superior phone to hold in one's hand.

What they need for me is to implement Exchange server search and to make a better designed hardware implementation. I tell you if they put that OS on something like a Nokia E66 design I would never touch an iPhone again. Also a home screen card would be nice - just a place to glance at your appointments and tasks. But the notifications on it are second to none.

It truly takes the "iPhone revolution" to the next level. Nobody has even come close to that yet, not Google/HTC/SE/Nokia.

It would truly sadden me if anything were to happen to Palm. It wold also reinforce my belief that American consumers would not know a good thing if it bit them in the ass. They only go for hype and marketing. PT Barnum was right.


RE: Out
By clovell on 3/2/2010 12:45:27 PM , Rating: 2
As a Pre user, myself, I completely agree. It's disheartening to see Palm in its current position, because I believe the Pre is a fantastic phone.

The Pre was, simply put, marketed completely wrong. Anand said it best - the Pre is a Cloud Messaging device. In between computers, errands, and on the road, the Pre saves my life everyday.

At a concert? Snap a shot. Hungry after? Find a restaurant. At the store and feeling inspired to make your own pizza dough? Look up the ingredents & add it to your list. New contact out of business cards? Type a memo & add them on Facebook - the Pre will do the rest. Facebook, nav, NFL (I listen to non-televised games on their local radio station via Sprint), Flash Support (F you, Apple), etc. etc. Showed up to take a drug test for a new job, but forgot to bring the printout with your barcode? Open it in your email and let them scan it off your screen.

Anytime I don't have a computer handy, my Pre saves the day, and keeps me connected in a very clean, efficient, and intuitive way. That's what it's designed to do, but it was marketed and hyped as 'An iPhone Killer?'. It's not - they're absolutely different. Palm's initial marketing campaign never communicated this - nor did Sprint's, nor did Verizon's. These dumb-5hit marketing guys have missed the entire point of what the Palm's strengths are and how they can be taken advantage of by the average user. Price specials are nice, but anybody looking to put down that amount of coin wants to KNOW what they're getting.

For anyone who wants their phone to be a Comms device more than a Multimedia device, the Pre is an amazing piece of hardware. Otherwise, get an iPhone.


RE: Out
By Yawgm0th on 2/26/2010 1:37:21 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
they're the only one that control both the OS and hardware
Um... What about RIM, the smartphone market leader? Granted, RIM is more open than Apple, but still controls both OS and hardware.

Anyway, the current Palm's are pretty good. Different people have different preferences. There is enough room in this market for five major players, IMO.


RE: Out
By adiposity on 2/26/2010 7:12:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
quote: they're the only one that control both the OS and hardware Um... What about RIM, the smartphone market leader? Granted, RIM is more open than Apple, but still controls both OS and hardware.


Am I missing something here? What about Palm (the topic of the article)?


RE: Out
By mcnabney on 2/27/2010 1:18:23 AM , Rating: 2
Their market share is too small to bother mentioning.

Choosing Sprint as an exclusive provider for the first ten months nailed their coffin shut. They needed to sell their devices on all four of the top wireless companies to generate the volume that would build their App store. They don't have the luxury (or market window) to grow like Apple.


RE: Out
By johnr81 on 2/28/2010 5:09:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Choosing Sprint as an exclusive provider for the first ten months nailed their coffin shut

I have a Pre and like it, in fact I like it a lot more now after months of updates than when I first got it. Adding video and a flashing message light was really nice this time around (favorite update by far).

Palm may have limited their initial success by going with Sprint, but I don't believe that's going to lead to their demise. They've got a solid start and now when they move to other carriers like Verizon they have a nicer OS to offer. I also believe they just released, or are releasing a more powerful C++ webOS dev environment.

Now they can approach the other carriers like BlackBerry does and try to increase their market share. Unlike BlackBerry, webOS is actual based on linux, so it's not as proprietary to start with (as far as OS). They lower their predictions by 25% and their stock goes down 25%, big deal, that's the market correcting appropriately.


RE: Out
By Yawgm0th on 2/26/10, Rating: 0
RE: Out
By Yawgm0th on 2/26/2010 1:42:03 PM , Rating: 4
Dammit...


RE: Out
By Targon on 2/26/2010 5:00:45 PM , Rating: 2
If Android is not actually better, but just different, then Android alone will not be a huge factor here. There is a large number of people who don't care about apps if what comes with the phone does the job for them.

On the business front, you have calendar and address book stuff being the primary NEEDS in a phone. Isn't that what got Blackberry/RIM to where they are now, e-mail while on the move, plus address book? Apps may improve the appeal of a device, but they alone will not make or break how good a phone is.

And, there ARE some good apps for WebOS, and the potential is there for many more. The iPhone may thrive on apps(since as a phone it isn't fantastic), but that doesn't mean every company needs to follow that model.


RE: Out
By mcnabney on 2/27/2010 11:27:21 AM , Rating: 2
Android has one key advantage over Apple or RIM. There are literaly going to be dozens of different Android devices released this year which allows consumers a choice in the form and appearance of their device. This advantage was once Windows Mobile ONLY advantage, and Google has stolen it.


RE: Out
By Chadder007 on 2/26/2010 9:38:05 PM , Rating: 3
Actually I like the WebOS better than Android.
I just hate the form factor of the Palm's though. I need a wide keyboard, and i'd like a screen like the Droid's.


RE: Out
By mcnabney on 2/27/2010 1:20:40 AM , Rating: 2
The Droid's screen is awesome. I like impressing people when I am playing full resolution DVD rips (from my legally purchased DVDs). The camera shoots video at DVD resolutions too, but don't expect too much at low light when shooting video.


Part of the problem
By UncleRufus on 2/26/2010 12:44:28 PM , Rating: 5
I don't know who was in on the designing of that Palm Pre, but anyone with normal size thumbs has a very hard time typing anything on that thing.

Really, I was looking forward to it, and I went to check it out as soon as one was available locally.

What a bitter disappointment. The OS may be fantastic, and the phone may be a cool shape and all, but from the few minutes I spent with it, I found that keyboard to be almost completely unusable. I would have to grow my fingernails out so that I would have something to press the keys with. Trying to use my thumb, I was hitting 4 buttons at a time.

It absolutely boggles my mind. You would think that someone along the way at Palm would have spoken up and mentioned "Hey...does anyone else here have trouble hitting the buttons on this thing?"

It's kind of like those Star Wars prequels. You would think that someone along the way would have said "Hey, waitaminute, half of this movie is complete garbage!"




RE: Part of the problem
By UncleRufus on 2/26/2010 12:45:22 PM , Rating: 2
I assume that's why it was marketed primarily to women, but I have a feeling that decision was made after the phone was well out of the designing process.


RE: Part of the problem
By psychobriggsy on 2/26/2010 1:27:21 PM , Rating: 3
Surely Palm can see that a large portion of the market prefers slightly slimmer, touch-screen-keyboard devices? They've had plenty of time to design a version of the Pre with a soft keyboard, like the iPhone and many Android devices.

These soft keyboards are pretty good, with their corrections based upon where you were typing (so accuracy isn't that important - getting in the right area is all that is required) and ability to have multiple soft keyboard variants / numpads / etc.

If Palm catered for this part of the market, they would sell more devices. Of course, marketing is important, and I've only seen a few adverts in the UK for the Pre, which they sold via O2 at the time when O2 was the iPhone supplier. People chose the iPhone. Going with another carrier would have been gravy, but they messed up strategically.


RE: Part of the problem
By omnicronx on 2/26/2010 1:47:19 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Surely Palm can see that a large portion of the market prefers slightly slimmer, touch-screen-keyboard devices?
Actually I think they saw the exact opposite, touch only phones are not even close to as large as the keyboard device market.

I prefer touch phones after using one for 2 years now, but as it stands, I assure you there are far more that prefer compact qwerty or a full keyboard.

I think they were just trying to differentiate themselves from the iPhone, not everything needs to be an iPhone clone to be successful.


RE: Part of the problem
By Diesel Donkey on 2/26/2010 8:11:12 PM , Rating: 3
I think many people are under the impression that software keyboards are better because Apple never gave them a choice. Steve Jobs said "Let there be software keyboards", and the people saw it, and they thought it was good.


RE: Part of the problem
By acase on 2/26/2010 2:09:17 PM , Rating: 4
/facePalm


RE: Part of the problem
By Targon on 2/26/10, Rating: 0
RE: Part of the problem
By Diesel Donkey on 2/26/2010 8:15:16 PM , Rating: 2
Assuming that by "normal" you mean "average", you have to remember that half of the population has smaller than average hands, and half has larger hands. I don't disagree that it might be a good idea for Palm to have a product with larger keys for large-fingered folks, but I, being someone with smaller hands, am quite happy with the size of the keyboard on the Pre. I've tried landscape keyboards, and I've found that it takes a lot of time to move my thumbs between the more distant keys. I'm far more efficient on a landscape keyboard with keys that are smaller and closer together. There's less thumb "travel time" involved.


WebOS
By toyotabedzrock on 2/26/2010 2:26:16 PM , Rating: 2
I personally like WebOS, it has a lot of potential if Palm can just get customers to pick up the phone and try it.




RE: WebOS
By tviceman on 2/26/2010 2:32:17 PM , Rating: 2
I love it to. I don't see myself switching from a palm phone for a long time.


RE: WebOS
By UppityMatt on 2/26/2010 3:41:55 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed,
I had a G1 and an HTC Hero, and i much prefer my palm pre over both. The keyboard just takes some getting use to..although i do not suffer from giant thumb syndrome. And the cards system is just genious


RE: WebOS
By UncleRufus on 2/26/2010 4:10:47 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed here as well. I should mention that, despite my rant earlier...if they would just put out a side-slider Palm Pre, I'd probably be all over it.


I really wanted a Pre Plus on Verizon until...
By johnsonx on 2/26/2010 8:08:56 PM , Rating: 2
I really wanted a Pre Plus on Verizon until I found out the mobile hot spot option costs an EXTRA $40 per month, IN ADDITION to the voice and data plan for the phone. It really irks me how they touted it as a 'free' app... sure the app itself is free, you just can't use it without paying $40 per month. I would find it very handy a few times a month, but for me it just isn't worth a fixed $40 per month, each and every month. I'm sure there are plenty of people for whom the feature will be worth every penny though.




By Diesel Donkey on 2/26/2010 8:18:57 PM , Rating: 2
Setting up Bluetooth tethering on the Pre is very easy and completely free. Given how just iPhones have brought AT&T's data network to its knees, I would hate to see what would happen to Verizon's network if all data-capable phones were suddenly allowed to tether for free. Granted, Verizon's network is considerably more solid than AT&T's, but I still think free tethering would be a challenge for it.


How much longer can Palm survive?
By iluvdeal on 2/26/2010 8:25:39 PM , Rating: 2
It was a mistake from the start to limit the Pre to a carrier, Sprint, whose business prospects were remarkably similar to Palm as both were and still are market laggards looking to gain market share. If Palm wanted to make a splash with the Pre in their debut, they should have included Verizon from the start.

I'd say it's already too late for Palm, the Pre was their gamble and it didn't pay off. I'm seeing a slow decline from their current stock price of $6.xx back to under $1. The question now is will any company buy out Palm? I hear Dell mentioned as a potential suitor frequently. I don't see that happening as why would you want to battle software giants like Apple's iPhone, Google's Android, or Microsoft's Windows Mobile with your own proprietary OS? Let those guys put all the money and resources into developing the OS. If you want to sell a computer, do you program your own OS? Phones are no different. Just license Android or Windows Mobile OS, get access to all their apps, and focus on marketing your own phone.

Palm had a great run, the Pre was a valiant last hurrah, but their time has passed. If you work for Palm, starting sending out those resumes now rather than later. If you were one of those Apples engineers Palm coaxed to switch over, I hope you didn't burn any bridges back in Cupertino. :)




By k20boy on 2/26/2010 8:55:57 PM , Rating: 2
I think this is ridiculously overstated. Palm makes a solid product and one of the biggest issues is marketing. I think with Verizon's new focus on the Pre Plus, we will begin to see Palm's unit shipment increase significantly. Then, an ATT launch will allow it to have access to some 200 million potential customers (ATT, Verizon, Sprint). I do agree that launching with Sprint was rough for them, but I also think that they couldn't ramp production to the levels that Verizon would have initially wanted. If they can launch a new device that is faster, with a larger screen (and maybe a touch keyboard) with Flash support, I think they are well positioned against any major rivals. Also, a company that would benefit tremendously by buying Palm is Nokia. They are the world market leader but Symbian needs a reboot and they need carrier contracts in the US. They could drive webOS to be a real threat to Apple, Android and RIM. Best wishes to webOS -the greatest mobile OS on the planet!


Disappointing news...
By TennesseeTony on 2/26/2010 6:12:21 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
...it delivered some disappointing news...revenue of...$300M to $320M USD in...third quarter...


Yeah, profit of any sort is always such a bummer. A mere 1.2 BILLION a year is horrible. Thank God they have that $500 million cash reserve to help them through this horrid economic downturn.




RE: Disappointing news...
By johnsonx on 2/26/2010 7:57:48 PM , Rating: 2
Revenue is not profit. Having revenue down 25% or so from expectations really is bad news, you can't downplay it.

That said, I did find the sensational headline choice a bit Mick-ish. Nothing in the article suggests "Panic Mode".


Plan to get one
By ICBM on 2/26/2010 12:54:54 PM , Rating: 2
Once ATT gets the new Palm devices, I will be moving to them. I have been an iphone user for 2 years now, and while I like it, I prefer webos. I have been demoing the Pre for 2 weeks now. Only reason I have to wait for ATT is because that who is our company is with.




Liked it.
By Motoman on 2/26/2010 1:19:32 PM , Rating: 2
Before my employer forced everyone to start using Blackberries many moons ago, I had a first-gen Palm Treo. It was WAY better than the Crapberry. The one and only thing the Crapberry had, still has, that is useful in comparison to anything else is good Exchange integration. In every other way, pretty much anything else on the market is better. So long as it has a real keyboard, as any phone that only offers an on-screen keyboard is utterly useless to me.




By Diesel Donkey on 2/26/2010 8:46:28 PM , Rating: 2
I'm afraid that it's just plain wrong to say that webOS 1.4 is bringing Flash. What IS happening is that 1.4 will lay the final groundwork necessary for Adobe to implement Flash in webOS. However, actually getting Flash out is Adobe's responsibility.




RIMM+PALM
By jk1234 on 2/28/2010 4:09:58 AM , Rating: 2
Maybe RIM should just buy out Palm and produce something like Blackberry WebOS. I mean Palm's worth less than 3% of RIM's market cap. Though RIM will probably stick with the Blackberry OS to the very (and possibly bitter) end..




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