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Notebooks fly past desktops in consumer PC sales

The writing has been on the wall for years concerning the rise of the notebook computer. Notebooks were once relegated to business professionals and the upwardly mobile types that didn't mind paying $1,000 USD or more to “cut the cord.”

However, Intel's Centrino campaign coupled with lower component prices have allowed the notebook market to blossom. Society's craving for wireless Internet access anywhere and a shrinking performance gap between desktops and notebooks have finally allowed the former to rise to the top in consumer PC sales.

Notebooks for the first time outsold desktops during 2007 for the consumer market. Online retailer Amazon.com reinforced the dominance of the notebook with its sales stats for the holiday season – 16 of its top-selling PCs during the holiday season were notebooks.

While consumers are quickly adopting notebooks to replace desktops, corporations are also making the switch – albeit at a slower pace. For this reason, notebooks still trail desktops slightly in overall PC marketshare.

Notebook sales increased to 31.6 million units during 2007 (a rise of 21 percent) while desktop sales dipped to 35 million units (a fall of 4 percent) for the overall PC market. Notebooks are expected to gain momentum in the coming years and are projected to reach 66 percent overall PC marketshare (71 percent for consumers) by 2011.

Consumers have been quick to snap up current bargain-basement 15.4” notebooks which can often be had for $399 to $499 at retailers like Staples, Best Buy and Circuit City – often without rebates attached. While these cheap desktop alternatives often come with integrated graphics, Celeron-M or Pentium Dual Core processors and usually 1GB of memory, their specs are more than enough to browse the Internet and plow through productivity applications.

Manufacturers like ASUS have also opened the floodgates at even lower price points with the Eee PC. The Eee PC starts at $299 for a model with a 630MHz Celeron-M processor, 512MB of RAM and a 2GB solid-state drive (SSD). The meager specifications for the Eee PC family haven't stopped consumers from snatching the sub-notebooks up at a record pace and ASUS is projecting to sell 3.8 million of the devices during 2008.



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Surprising? Not really.
By Enigmatic on 1/2/2008 2:43:38 PM , Rating: 2
Considering laptop prices are actually somewhat competitive with desktop prices this makes them a much more viable option for those who prefer some mobility. I think the lower flexibility in upgrading doesn't really affect the average user who tends to avoid upgrades anyways.

In my house we have 4 computers that are set-up and running (many more which are disassembled though). But our last two computer purchases have been laptops so I can see that even my household is indicative of this trend. You can a get a laptop with a large screen, pentium dual-core, 1-2 gb of ram and with 120-160 gb hdd for well under $700 and that's more than enough computing power than most people need.




RE: Surprising? Not really.
By monitorjbl on 1/2/2008 2:47:23 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, a lot of colleges are starting to require students to have laptops now as well. I think that counts for a significant chunk of the sales.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By xsilver on 1/2/2008 3:08:07 PM , Rating: 3
That itself would largely come down to them being so cheap nowadays.
5 years ago the cheapest model would be 3x-4x what they are now.
Plus even a cheap celeron-m laptop is going to be more than enough power for most users who only surf and do word processing.

Im surprised though that there hasnt been a laptop developed with a 15+ cell battery because if everyone in a class or a conference room has a laptop; im not sure all locations will be able to provide 1 power socket per user. Also if you forget to charge the thing at night, you're boned for the next day.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By rudy on 1/2/2008 3:59:56 PM , Rating: 5
Yeah but in this day and age what user just surfs and does word processing? As people become more computer literate they immediately jump to using the PC more for other things. I see people gaming in every spot you can find a hard connection on campus. I don't care if the Laptop replaces the desktop so long as it does not come at a price as we have seen with displays. You simply can't find an LCD display that can compete with 7 year old high end CRTs for performance and flexibility. And sadly gamers like me are getting pinched into a corner thanks to the mass market not wanting CRTs anymore. Laptops are expensive to upgrade and many times barely upgradeable. I dread the day when production of desktop components will drop to the point manufactures decide not to produce them at all as is the case with CRT monitors. And with games like crysis coming out and blowing anything we have away I don't see the need for high end machines and the ability to upgrade going away.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By ImSpartacus on 1/2/2008 4:41:09 PM , Rating: 2
By the time desktops are retired laptops will be just as upgradable as desktops are now.

Think of how desktops started, could you upgrade one of the first ibm's? How about the apples after them? At some point, someone figured that an end user could upgrade his own dekstop and started to build compatible parts.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Souka on 1/2/2008 4:55:01 PM , Rating: 1
Hey, I had an Apple ][+ in 1979...running on 48k of ram...

1980 I upgraded it to 64k...and it was soo much better with it....and for several years after other upgrades were done by my brother and I.

So yes... desktops have been upgradeable for quite some time... :)


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By xsilver on 1/2/2008 5:48:27 PM , Rating: 3
Go check out your local library for a mix of "non hardcore" pc users.
See what you find
Result: email / word processing /flash games /youtube clips

Your barebones laptop that supports the above plus has a large enough hard drive for 6mp photo's will be more than enough for 60+% of users. Wireless NIC is also a requirement these days, but Im not sure if there are new laptops that dont ship with one these days.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/3/2008 2:51:20 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Laptops are expensive to upgrade and many times barely upgradeable
This does not bother most of the buyers. People just replace the whole machine most of the time, noone but a couple of techies cares about upgrades.
quote:
with games like crysis coming out and blowing anything we have away I don't see the need for high end machines and the ability to upgrade going away
Crysis is a failure and a sales dud, unfortunately, and in general gaming seems to be less and less tightly bound to your classic PC with powerful and expensive CPU and GPU. Crysis sales are laughable -> in future there will be no games like Crysis anymore -> less desktops sold -> more notebooks sold. Plain and simple. People just don't need the UberPower of the desktop anymore.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By rudy on 1/2/2008 4:04:33 PM , Rating: 2
On a side note it would be nice to see someone come out with a "portable" desktop sort of a lanputer idea. Something with say a 20" screen and a small form factor case attached and some sort of harness to hold the keyboard and mouse together. Give it an optional batter given how often I can find a batter and how bad the batter life on powerful laptops is, I find it the batter on a laptop is not really all that needed. I have had multiple people I helped purchase a laptop tell me they simply did not care about batter life for these reasons when asked if they wanted to sacrifice performance for batter life.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By InternetGeek on 1/2/2008 5:01:21 PM , Rating: 2
Look for Desktop Replacement laptops. THey are sized anywhere between 17" to 21". They are still portable but heavy. Basically they are portable workstations.

I got mine and haven't thought about a desktop anymore... might never get one again (desktop).


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Ringold on 1/2/2008 4:27:36 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
a lot of colleges are starting to require students to have laptops now as well.


I would hope that's a limited trend. I for one rationalized the purchase of a laptop that way, and it ended up being used perhaps once every 3 months. I used it quite a bit early on, but I recognized that I retained information better through a mix of watching and writing notes by hand, which took more effort. I probably could get similar results by focusing harder while typing, but why fight it when the result came naturally writing by hand?

Besides, frankly, if you walk across the back of any college class room and look at whats on people's laptop screens, you might see Office on perhaps 10% of them. If you're lucky, might even see someone playing WoW!

Once I got home, the power, size and versatility of my desktop means the laptop is virtually never used at home. 15 inch screen with a loud fan under load, no upgrade options and slower components, or a 20" beast that can barely be heard due to 12cm fan goodness?

It gets used when I travel, but thats about it. To help with portability, I'll get a 10-inch screened EeePC if/when they hit the market.

Maybe I'm an enthusiast and therefore biased, but laptops.. have limited appeal.

I think perhaps once laptops are as saturated amongst American consumers as desktops presently are the trend may reverse or significantly slow down. Desktops may never reign again, though, as laptops must be trashed while desktops can be upgraded, I'll admit. That is, unless some sort of standard comes in to play and we can, as users, start modding them to our hearts content -- but that would endanger the industries glorious and entrenched forced upgrade cycle.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By InternetGeek on 1/2/2008 5:04:16 PM , Rating: 1
Most laptops can be upgraded these days if you shop wisely. For example: go for the 3d-powered laptop.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By TomZ on 1/2/2008 5:39:03 PM , Rating: 4
That's a lame argument, since there's still a world of difference between desktops and laptops in that regard. Think about it - how many laptops let you upgrade the keyboard, mouse, display, audio, video, etc., let alone giving you the opportunity to make larger changes like changing the motherboard or power supply. Forget about it.

That said, I do understand the trend towards laptops in the consumer space. They are smaller, easier to set up, readily portable, etc. - overall very convenient.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/2/08, Rating: -1
RE: Surprising? Not really.
By monitorjbl on 1/2/2008 8:10:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And who's gonna replace MOTHERBOARD on a notebook? Your average consumer? Riiight...

You know, I've done that quite a bit on my desktop. If you like a case, and you want to keep it, its a rather straightforward task to upgrade everything inside since all of the parts are standardized.

Aside from that, capacitor problems, spilling coffee on your notebook, and several other legitimate things are very good reasons for a "normal" user replacing a laptop's motherboard outside of the manufacturer's warranty. It's a shortcoming of notebooks, don't think otherwise.

Though I have to say, the worst shortcoming is the lack of video upgradability for integrated graphics notebooks. Upgrading the graphics gives an old desktop a much longer life.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/2/2008 8:53:05 PM , Rating: 1
Normal user just sends his/her machine to the service depot or something. Don't think otherwise.

Upgrading videocards works only for gamers, and how many of these left? Look at console vs PC game sales - nobody cares about those gaming videocards anymore. CONSOLE is The Word today, especially Xbox 360.

Normal people just throw away or sell old machine and buy a new one. And techies are a tiny minority. Hence the success of notebooks.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By monitorjbl on 1/2/2008 10:01:17 PM , Rating: 2
Well, like I said, outside of warranty, a user isn't left with many options besides dumping his old laptop and getting a new one. It's usually pretty expensive to replace a laptop motherboard without a warranty, to the point that replacing the entire notebook is cheaper, whereas a replacement desktop mobo can be found for (usually) around $150 if the case is standardized. Even if it isn't, you can still find replacement boards for desktops much more easily than you could a notebook.

I wouldn't say that no one cares about PC gamers, look at WoW, it's got around 9 million users now. Videocards are important for non-gamers too, they help with Windows Vista's Aero interface, and if you ever wanted to run the OS, it would be nice to buy a $70 video card for a laptop to make it work better, which you can with a desktop.

I'm not saying that "normal" users will always do this, it's just that they aren't given the option with notebooks, which is a shortcoming of the product.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/2/2008 10:24:38 PM , Rating: 1
For the non-techie normal user there's not a big difference between replacing mobo in a dead desktop or in a dead notebook - in both cases he'll pay a lot. Serviceman makes sure he pays a lot, you know ;)

WoW and Vista have no need in gaming cards, they work great on the integrated ATI video chips. And if the notebook is so old that it can't handle Aero, then replacing notebook's video card without replacing everything else will make Vista so slow that the user will buy a new notebook anyway. Hence this is a moot point.

Normal users tend to replace machines as a whole, rather than doing upgrades, since they don't know what is upgrade. Hence notebooks attract the normal users. Techies - yes, for them desktops could be better, I agree. If the world's population consisted of only techies then probably desktops wouldn't lose the market share to notebooks. Desktop is the best techie's friend, you're right on that.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By monitorjbl on 1/2/2008 8:10:13 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And who's gonna replace MOTHERBOARD on a notebook? Your average consumer? Riiight...

You know, I've done that quite a bit on my desktop. If you like a case, and you want to keep it, its a rather straightforward task to upgrade everything inside since all of the parts are standardized.

Aside from that, capacitor problems, spilling coffee on your notebook, and several other legitimate things are very good reasons for a "normal" user replacing a laptop's motherboard outside of the manufacturer's warranty. It's a shortcoming of notebooks, don't think otherwise.

Though I have to say, the worst shortcoming is the lack of video upgradability for integrated graphics notebooks. Upgrading the graphics gives an old desktop a much longer life.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By InternetGeek on 1/2/2008 10:44:32 PM , Rating: 2
Normally in a laptop if you need to 'upgrade' the keyboard or mouse or display you are switching it for an unbroken one, ie: cracked LCD, scratched touched pad or borken keys. What you do in that situation is just find a replacement part. Either your manufacturer or someone else will provide those.

The parts that you are more likely to upgrade are CPU, Video Card, HDD and RAM. Any laptop that does not use an integrated GPU will allow you to change those. Yes, you cannot go to newegg to order a new video card for your laptop yet, but you can call your manufacturer and get the newer version of a given GPU which would normally be provided as a replacement part for the newer model for your given laptop. As long as thermal/power requirements are still within design nothing is keeping you from doing that without much hassle.

I for one open up my laptop once a year for dusting and thermal paste renewal. I plan to get a SSD when the price is worth.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/3/2008 2:56:35 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
you can call your manufacturer and get the newer version of a given GPU which would normally be provided as a replacement part for the newer model for your given laptop
Ah, right, now it turns out I can call Dell and they will sell me 8800GTX Mobile chip for my Vostro 1700. Great! Now if only Dell knew that... :-))))

Heh, what a nice and beautiful legend, I wonder if people really buying that


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By notfeelingit on 1/3/2008 2:55:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The parts that you are more likely to upgrade are CPU, Video Card, HDD and RAM. Any laptop that does not use an integrated GPU will allow you to change those.

Generally a laptop's thermal characteristics are designed around the CPU and GPU. These are made to match a specific GPU. In the vast majority of cases, a laptop's GPU cannot be upgraded without modifying its enclosure or cooling system.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/3/2008 4:00:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
n the vast majority of cases, a laptop's GPU cannot be upgraded without modifying its enclosure or cooling system
InternetGeek obviously does not understand that. Hence his silence when I asked him abut my Dell Vostro 1700. A beautiful theory is one thing, but when you try to test it in real life... oops, InternetGeek's legend of an "upgradable" laptop GPU suddenly seems to be not so true anymore.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By eye smite on 1/2/2008 9:08:35 PM , Rating: 2
I've read alot of the comments and think they all have good points. I'll toot the horn for the one perspective that everyone is overlooking. Adults still have a child in them and that child is screaming " i want i want". I'm sure the rise in laptop sales is because the want has always been there, but the justification to spend that kind of money was overshadowed by other rationale. Now all of a sudden they're not just affordable, but very affordable, so the kid inside screaming i want it, is finally able to justify the money spent. Can't you hear the masses saying " oh I can afford $599, that's dirt cheap to 3 yrs ago". So it doesn't surprise me at all, where the trend will hit an ice berg is when these people see the limitations and see they don't have much upgrade path, they'll likely go back to a desktop.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By rudy on 1/3/2008 12:08:55 AM , Rating: 2
This is possible but it focuses on the consumer becoming aware of the drawbacks. Unfortunately by the time they become aware they may have destroyed the market for the desktop. This is much the way most consumers have no clue about displays then their kids come crying about how they want something better for gaming and I say tough luck you can't even purchase CRTs in most places anymore, the few that are left are the 15 inch junk. You have to goto a few online retailers to find a nice 21" rig and you have to go used or refurbished to get the awesome ones. Right now I hoard every good CRT I find cheap and hope they will last me till some major improvements happen in the LCD world or something better comes out.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/3/2008 3:02:57 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
their kids come crying about how they want something better for gaming and I say tough luck you can't even purchase CRTs in most places anymore
Ohh poor kids... poor babies... I gonna cryyy... they can't purchase 30" CRTs, they can only purchase those ugly 30" LCDs... and even more ugly 37" LCDs, and absolutely horrible 28" LCDs... ahhhh [passing out due to excessive sadness]

What a funny BS this is :) Have you ever tried Doom 3 in 2560x1600? Nope? Go worship those tubes, haha, and I gonna have some REAL fun you can only dream about with your museum CRT :P


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By eye smite on 1/3/2008 7:15:32 AM , Rating: 2
You know, we're all happy that your such a techy to enjoy lcd displays with such fervor and push them up in resolution and really use what you have. What you're doing is the old Ford vs Chevy argument. You think lcd's are better than crt's, he thinks the opposite. Which is it intel or AMD that's better? My point is, it doesn't matter what preference you have, no one here cares. So if you want to rant like a child and taunt someone else because of your preferences, we'll treat you like a child here. Did mommy and daddy tuck you in last night, and did you sleep good with your wooby?


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Pirks on 1/3/2008 12:47:19 PM , Rating: 2
You obviously don't understand how it sounds when you recommend tiny ugly low-resolution CRT to a kid instead of nice large high resolution LCD, and even worse - when you recommend it for GAMING! Grow up.


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By othercents on 1/2/2008 4:03:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But our last two computer purchases have been laptops

I can see where I have purchased laptops in the past two years, but if you really take a look at my purchases you will notice that I have upgraded my desktop more often. While the limitation on the laptop requires me to buy a new one, the desktop still allows me to upgrade parts as I need. I had one desktop for 10 years and just upgraded parts as needed.

Plus my desktop is my Media Center that does everything from DVD, DVR, etc. I won't buy a laptop for that function.

Other


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By Ringold on 1/2/2008 4:37:21 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I had one desktop for 10 years and just upgraded parts as needed.


Clark Howard, somewhere, is smiling because he felt a great cheapness in the Force. :)

Really, though, I can't get mine to survive that long. I cannabalized the PC's I owned from the 90s, and the oldest box I currently have, a dual Athlon MP 2400+ system, won't POST and just isn't worth fixing (I've ruled out the PSU, all other possibilities are exponentially more annoying).


RE: Surprising? Not really.
By EnderJ on 1/2/2008 5:22:31 PM , Rating: 2
I guess you could say that my current PC can be traced back to my old 386SX 16.

At least, it still has the 3.5" floppy drive from that PC. The rest of it has been upgraded and replaced numerous times.


DIY Laptop parts
By phatboye on 1/2/2008 4:04:47 PM , Rating: 2
Why is it that it is so hard to find decent parts for those of us who wish to build their own laptops. I would have had a laptop buy now if I could build my own.




RE: DIY Laptop parts
By Pirks on 1/2/2008 4:13:43 PM , Rating: 2
What's the problem with getting barebook or base model of some dell and equipping it with hi-end stuff for half a price? Just use newegg and stick the parts in dell or barebook (by asus or quanta or whoever). Dells are almost as upgradeable as desktops these days. Well, video cards are not but who in their sane mind uses notebooks for gaming anyway? 8600GT in cheap Dell is a killer for anything you do on it, even HL2 EP2 works great, what else do you want man?? :)


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By InternetGeek on 1/2/2008 5:07:51 PM , Rating: 2
I do. I even play oblivion and ut on my laptop. Which is why I only I recommend people to shop wisely when getting a laptop. If you do some reasearch you will find out which models allow you to upgrade the video card should you need to. Most desktop replacement laptops allow you to change the cpu and video card without much hassle.

In my case I got a 7900GS, but I can switch it for a better video card. I might not do this because the CPU is a Core T2700.


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By InternetGeek on 1/2/2008 5:07:54 PM , Rating: 2
I do. I even play oblivion and ut on my laptop. Which is why I only I recommend people to shop wisely when getting a laptop. If you do some reasearch you will find out which models allow you to upgrade the video card should you need to. Most desktop replacement laptops allow you to change the cpu and video card without much hassle.

In my case I got a 7900GS, but I can switch it for a better video card. I might not do this because the CPU is a Core T2700.


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By Pirks on 1/2/2008 5:32:48 PM , Rating: 2
Could you please tell me what notebook models allow easy videocard upgrade? I couldn't find those, even Dells allow changing everything but the video card.


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By Haltech on 1/2/2008 8:20:20 PM , Rating: 2
it all depends on the model of the manufacturer. Most if not all Dells XPS can upgrade the vid. I bought recently a Toshiba Qosmio with an upgraded 8600GT with T7700.


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By InternetGeek on 1/2/2008 10:37:48 PM , Rating: 2
What you're looking for is for laptops that do not use integrated GPUs. So what you do is find out from the makers website how is the GPU connected to the motherboard. Once you know it is using a mobile video card, all you need to upgrade the video card is a screw driver, notepad and pencil and patience.

In my case, I open my laptop once a year for dusting and thermal paste renewal. It's a Satellite P105-S921. I was thinking about upgrading the CPU but it doesnt make much sense though the laptop does allow it.


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By Pirks on 1/2/2008 11:13:37 PM , Rating: 1
Here's an easy way to test your beautiful theory - just try to find me a replacement/upgrade video card for my Dell Vostro 1700, will you? I have 8600GT installed, care to show me a replacement/upgrade card that I can put there instead of 8600GT?


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By Bioniccrackmonk on 1/2/2008 4:15:57 PM , Rating: 2
My guess is probably due to thermal issues and the lack of 3rd party items one can buy for a laptop compared to a desktop. Its a lot easier to surpass the amount of air a laptop case can move then your standard tower case, even the regular desktop cases.

I thought dailytech did an article in the past about a manufacturer that was going to do something similar to this. I believe it was along the lines of the case, monitor and motherboard would already be there, but you could have your pick at processors, ram and everything else. I might be mistaken though.


RE: DIY Laptop parts
By Pirks on 1/2/2008 5:43:56 PM , Rating: 1
I don't think there are thermal issues in modern notebooks, we got 45nm chips from Intel that are pretty cold and fast, and soon quad-core notebooks are going to pop up everywhere, hence no issues with CPU performance and heat.

And since noone really cares about 3D gaming on laptops (a couple of freaks paying $3000+ for gaming brick doesn't count) the video card heat is not an issue as well. You can play HL2 EP2 or WoW or Sims or whatever on your cheapo Dell with 8600GT, here's your gaming if you want. I played Sims and HL2 EP2 on my Dell notebook with 8600GT inside - blazing fast 3D and no heat whatsoever. The notebook is a bit warm when the game is running and that's it, and no noise at all.

So I don't know what is that thermal blah blah you're talking about. Maybe you got some P4 Prescott or something in your notebook? I heard older notebooks could get real hot and some crappy Mac Books and Mac Book Pros as well, but... well, seems like this thermal issue only depends on how crappy your notebook design is, just don't buy Apple or Prescott-based notebooks and you'll be fine ;)


Improved Laptop Quality & Wireless
By kelmon on 1/3/2008 10:07:29 AM , Rating: 2
As far as I can see it the two factors that have caused laptops to become more attractive is that their overall quality has improved dramatically over the fast few years and the advent of wireless networking. Early laptops that I used were horrendous when compared to desktops as they were underpowered, slow and generally a pain in the backside. However, current laptops are damned powerful even in the budget market so there is relatively little trade-off now when it comes to performance. Further, wireless internet access is now cheap and plentiful so it is desirable to people to have access to this. While a desktop can be used with a wireless receiver it is more useful to use a laptop instead since you can then do your computing where ever you want.

Personally, I switched to a laptop and a wireless network when we moved to a house that had insufficient space for an office. While I was initially worried that the laptop would be a downgrade from my then desktop it turned out not to be the case and I can't think of a reason to go back.




RE: Improved Laptop Quality & Wireless
By rcc on 1/3/2008 2:33:54 PM , Rating: 2
While notebooks have improved greatly in the last few years, there are still a host of performance/space/power compromises in them. Personally I have one of each, but as far as general useability, speed and feel, I much prefer the desktop. Then again, if I'm giving a presentation somewhere, I'd sure rather pack the notebook.

Each to it's own strengths, however, to the vast majority of casual computer users the notebook is a better solution. The performance really doesn't matter, and it takes up less space on a desk, etc.


RE: Improved Laptop Quality & Wireless
By Pirks on 1/3/2008 3:56:28 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
While notebooks have improved greatly in the last few years, there are still a host of performance/space/power compromises in them
So you too never heard of X7900 and 8800M GTX? I wonder where do the people get that weed they smoke... nobody here seems to understand that laptops can beat almost any (but the very high end) desktop easily, just put high end mobile chips inside. Yes, laptops are more expensive because they are portable, but perofmance-wise they'd kill most of the desktops that the local DT reading idiots are using. I'm talking about people spewing BS about "performance lacking" notebooks. WTF you're smoking people? :-0


RE: Improved Laptop Quality & Wireless
By rcc on 1/10/2008 5:23:40 PM , Rating: 2
Whatever it is, it's not as good as the stuff you are on.


I think its just a transient fashion thing
By Amiga500 on 1/3/2008 4:23:39 AM , Rating: 3
Soon people will realise (once again) that desktops make alot more sense.

The mobility of a laptop comes at a high cost in terms of ease of use (IMO) - a small cluttered keyboard, a small monitor, a comparative lack of power.

I reckon alot of the people buying laptops now will not buy another one again.




By kelmon on 1/3/2008 9:58:12 AM , Rating: 2
I'll take that bet. I'm on my second laptop at the moment and I'm damned if I'm ever going back to a desktop again. Yes, there are trade-offs with a laptop but the convenience of being able to take my computer anywhere trumps them very easily. Besides which, almost all restrictions can be overcome with plug-in accessories anyway if they are a real problem (for example, I use a full sized keyboard at work with the laptop).


By Pirks on 1/3/2008 1:05:20 PM , Rating: 2
Poor Amiga500 never heard of external keyboards, mice and monitors, and he seems to be unaware of X7900 and 8800M GTX, hence his funny BS about lack of power and such.

Just get out of the forest, Amiga500, and smell some civilization, will you?


Detachable Keyboard
By kibets on 1/2/2008 3:16:18 PM , Rating: 3
I never liked laptops because the screen is attached to the keyboard forcing me to sit a certain way to use properly. Plus I detest touchpads.

I'll stick with my desktop thank you.




RE: Detachable Keyboard
By Messudieh on 1/2/2008 3:56:08 PM , Rating: 2
Both types of machines have their place. Desktops are there for price and/or really computing/graphically intensive programs. Laptops are there for mobility.

All of the problems you mention can be solved easily. Fold your laptop down, attach a keyboard, mouse, and monitor, and voila; you have the same basic benefits as a desktop. Or run it with the laptop screen and external monitor at the same time; you get an added benefit that way. This is what I do at work.

I will concede that it would be slightly more difficult to detach the monitor if you don't have a docking station, but you get my point.


Come again?
By masher2 (blog) on 1/2/08, Rating: 0
RE: Come again?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 1/2/2008 4:46:22 PM , Rating: 2
Read the article/title again ;)

Notebooks are outselling desktops in the consumer sector. Corporate notebooks sales aren't quite outnumbering desktop sales yet, so the numbers are still a bit off.

Consumer notebook sales are past the 50% mark.


RE: Come again?
By Souka on 1/2/2008 4:57:23 PM , Rating: 2
also don't forget to factor in the lifespan of a Desktop vs a Laptop... which is another major reason laptops will surpass desktops in sales . . .


DIY desktops inlcuded?
By kmmatney on 1/2/2008 6:49:59 PM , Rating: 2
Does this just include pre-built desktops, from Dell, HP, etc... I'm sure there is a huge amount of DIY desktops that are not counted in this.




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