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Terrorist claims two more Christian ultraconservative cells are ready to strike in Norway

Anders Behring Breivik shocked Norway, committing the most heinous crime and terrorist attack in the nation's modern history.  Last year the 33-year-old killed eight by bombing government buildings in Norway's capital city, Oslo.  He then went on a shooting spree, targeting a youth retreat of the liberal Labour Party.  He fatally wounded 69 people, mostly teens.  The killings were inspired by Mr. Breivik's self-described radical ultra-conservative Christian views, and his dream of driving Muslims out of Norway.

I. Activision Blizzard's Terrorist Fantasy Inspired Real-Life Terrorist

In court, Mr. Breivik has drawn outrage for smiling when the killings were discussed.  Showing little remorse he stirred up more controversy this week, suggesting that video games helped condition him for his shooting spree.

A devout “World of Warcraft” fan, Mr. Breivik logged up to 16 hours in some marathon sessions.  But the gaming that proved most crucial to his dastardly plan was "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2", a wildly popular title published by Activision Blizzard, Inc. (ATVI).

Published in Nov. 2009, COD:MW2 is the second best-selling game of all time in the U.S. and UK.  While putting the character in the role of a soldier following orders with deadly accuracy no longer draws much shock in the first-person shooter genre, COD:MW2 did manage to stir up controversy by putting the player in the shoes of a terrorist attacking civilians at a Russian airport.  The game allowed the player to gun down realistically animated terrified civilians in cold blood.

Call of Duty: MW 2 terrorist mission
Norwegian terrorist Anders Breivik trained to kill civilians by playing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.  The game puts the player in the role of a terrorist and encourages them to murder terrified civilians in one level. [Image Source: PS3-Sense]

That depicition was enough to see temporary or permanent bans on the game in some regions.

(Warning video contains graphics depiction of violence.)

II. Video Games and Society -- Murder? "Ok." Consensual Sex?  "Bad!"

America and much of the world today practice a rather curious standard.  While putting the player in the role of a terrorist murdering citizens only earns a "Mature" rating, soft-core depictions of consensual sex between adults is a ticket to an instant "Mature" in most cases.  And if you depict hard-core sex, well, you are virtually guaranteed an "Adults Only" rating.
 
Mass Effect 2
Softcore depictions of consensual, "vanilla" intercourse between adults helped earn Mass Effect 2 a "mature" rating, the same rating given for games where the player role-plays a fantasy of being a terrorist murderer. [Image Source: Bioware]

The debate over sex and violence in video games has raged in America.  Some individuals like Jack Thompson have sought unsuccessfully to ban seemingly "immoral" titles depicting violent criminal fantasies, such as Grand Theft Auto.  Sexual depictions have been especially criticized, with some members of the media allegedly resorting to outright lies to villainize games with sexuality like Mass Effect.

Some claim that video games have destructive psychological effects, but other studies contradict this premise.  Some studies even show that gaming benefits reflexes and problem solving skills.

Over 97 percent of U.S. children play video games.  Studies found males to gravitate towards more violent video games.  Coincidentally males murder people in the U.S. at a rate nine times higher than females according to recent studies.

Many adults game as well, though the population of gaming adults -- particularly console gamers is thought to be smaller.  A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control claimed that the average 35-year-old gamer is overweight and depressed, suggesting long-term gaming may contribute to these health problems.

III. Anti-Islamic Terrorist Claims Inspiration From Osama bin Laden

The debate that will inevitably rage will be which influence was responsible for Mr. Breivik's dastardly deeds -- his racist, fundamentalist Christian views or the video games he so beloved.

Ironically while Mr. Breivik openly hates people of the Islamic faith and preaches "racial purity" in a 1,500 page manifesto, he claims inspiration from the internationally reviled late Islamic terrorist Osama bin Laden.  In court he testified, "We've taken a bit from al Qaeda and militant Islamists, including the glorification of martyrdom."

He claims to be part of a fundamentalist Christian terrorist organization dubbed "Knights Templar", a name that pays homage to a group of Christian crusaders who in the 1100s tried to conquer the Middle East in order to install Catholic Chrisitianity in the region.

Anders Breivik
Anders Breivik smiles when his killings are discussed in court.  The self-proclaimed anti-Islamic Christian terrorist says two more Christian ultraconservative ultranationalists who share his views remain at large, ready to attack and murder more Norwegian liberals.

He says his group was inspired by Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda's one-man cells.  He claims that two other Christian terrorists remain at large in Norway and are plotting attacks, though he did not reveal their names or locations.

There's significant controversy over Mr. Breivik's mental health status.  An initial expert panel of psychologists/psychiatrists claimed he was either schizophrenic or psychotic (separate medical conditions) during the shootings.  However, a second expert panel rejected this conclusion, instead finding he was merely a narcissist and that he did not suffer from any sort of clear psychotic/schizophrenic episode.  His mental status is under examination by an expert panel.

Source: CNN





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