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Print 23 comment(s) - last by EricMartello.. on Nov 7 at 11:49 PM

Df is the smallest and lightest FX-format DSLR camera Nikon has ever produced

Nikon has officially announced its latest digital camera called the Df. Nikon says that this new camera is a fusion of "flagship D4 image quality" in a small and light FX-format body. The camera has dial operation allowing for direct and intuitive operation and provides precision mechanics for high-quality photography.

Mechanical knobs also allow users to adjust settings at any time, even with the camera turned off. The Df uses a FX-format single sensor with a resolution of 16.2 megapixels combined with an EXPEED 3 image-processing engine from the D4 flagship digital camera. The Df supports ISO range from 100-12,800 and can be reduced to the equivalent of ISO 50 up to ISO 204,800. The camera has an autofocus system using 39 focus points in a scene recognition system using a built-in 2016-pixel RGB sensor.


The Df is relatively small, measuring 143.5 x 110 x 66.5 mm and weighs 710 g. Nikon says that makes it the smallest and lightest FX-format D-SLR camera in company history.

The camera can shoot continuous high-speed images at 5.5 FPS and stores them to SDXC memory cards. The Df can be purchased with an AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G special edition kit lens designed to offer superior performance with a compact and lightweight design.
 
Pricing and availability for the Df is unannounced this time.

Source: Nikon





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Seems like a legit product for some
By foxalopex on 11/5/2013 12:25:28 PM , Rating: 2
If the description isn't off this camera has mechanical manual controls. This might explain why it's so small. Some of the controls are not powered by actuators or anything. You just manually adjust them with human power.

Cute, I'm sure this camera will appeal to some photographers. As for myself, I like bells and whistles so I'll be staying with Canon.




RE: Seems like a legit product for some
By nikon133 on 11/5/2013 1:55:54 PM , Rating: 2
I was under impression that lately Canon was playing safer than Nikon in DSLR segment. What bells and whistles are you talking about?


RE: Seems like a legit product for some
By SPOOFE on 11/6/2013 8:32:31 PM , Rating: 2
There's additional video-related control functionality on the Canon side of the coin. Nikon has certainly been much more aggressive in still image quality.


By EricMartello on 11/7/2013 11:49:30 PM , Rating: 2
The Lumix GH2, and now the new GH3, are both better options for video than either Canon or Nikon DSLRs...and the nice thing is that you can buy an adapter to use either Canon or Nikon lenses on the GH-series cameras for some very good results.


Pricey though
By DesertCat on 11/5/2013 10:41:36 AM , Rating: 3
I am happy for the people that can afford the $3000 price tag of this camera + lens. I would not be amongst them. Many people on photo forums are in a bit of sticker shock today as they were figuring that the lack of video and such would help drop the price of the camera. As is, it's about $800-1000 more than many folks were hoping/expecting. More power to Nikon, though, if they have a target audience that will pay the price.

I respect that they've made a smallish FX camera body. It should deliver great images using the D4 sensor. I'll be purchasing something else.




By BuddyRich on 11/7/2013 7:42:01 AM , Rating: 2
Last year I got the Fuji X-E1,a DX sensor, also a very retro styled camera, mainly for its tiny size to take on a 1 month trip to Europe. The M43rds cameras (Oly, Panasonic) also offer small, capable cameras in small packages, which I compared with. Particularly the Oly OM-D which shared a similar retro design with knobs and dials for controls, but in the end I got the Fuji. I absolutely loved using it and even now, unless I need a long lens my D300 sits unused 95% of the time. Love the manual dials for common controls.

Sony's fixed lens RX-1 aside, I am surprised they got a FF sensor in this thing, while accommodating changeable lenses (supporting Nikon's age-old F-mount I assume), but even with my XE1, its the lens that undoes you. Using it with the 18-55 zoom (and they have an even long 50-200 now) vs. the 35mm prime was only about 200g in weight difference but about 2-3 (or a bit more when zoomed) inches in extruding profile and makes it front heavy. If you can get by with the prime its an awesome combination. And the 50mm on the FF is about equivalent to 35mm on DX which is a good 'everyday' lens.

No doubt they also want to capture some of hipster market with the Leica-like rangefinder design, with a price tag to match, but it'll ultimately be about how it performs.




retro for the sake of retro
By Nortel on 11/5/13, Rating: -1
RE: retro for the sake of retro
By soydios on 11/5/2013 10:23:27 AM , Rating: 5
Same viewfinder, flash sync, and faster continuous FX rate than the D800.

Some customers want different interfaces and styling than you.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By bug77 on 11/5/2013 10:33:59 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
When the hype is over and you aren't a hipster, the D800 is a way better camera for a very similar price.


Considering this has the same sensor as D4, I'm going to have to disagree.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By Lord 666 on 11/5/2013 2:53:38 PM , Rating: 2
And yet its still crippled by the 39 point AF of the D600/D610. For the cost savings, would just go with the D610 then.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By Monkey's Uncle on 11/5/2013 3:05:50 PM , Rating: 2
Real pros don't need no stinkin' AF.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By GulWestfale on 11/5/2013 4:57:22 PM , Rating: 2
i think real pros do like the hardware buttons. its much quicker to adjust certain things that way compared to having to click through several menus. kinda like when BMW first released iDrive, and afterwards they realized that people would still like a volume knob for their radios.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By EricMartello on 11/5/2013 11:11:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Considering this has the same sensor as D4, I'm going to have to disagree.


The D4 sensor is old; the D800 is Nikon's best and that's by a wide margin.

The D4 is not a bad camera - it is built to be rugged and fast. It's designed for photo journalism so it has high sustained rapid shooting and an AF system that keeps up. It also fares well in dim lighting, as you would have at a sports stadium or conference hall.

Unless you specifically need the speed of the D4, you are better off with the D800. It's an awesome camera and probably the best for stills you can find in its price range.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By bug77 on 11/6/2013 6:34:08 AM , Rating: 2
Well, hello! Speed and low-light performance is exactly what I'd be looking for if buying a full-frame. If you;re looking for a bazillion pixels, many compact cameras will indulge.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By SPOOFE on 11/6/2013 8:34:55 PM , Rating: 2
Low-light performance, sure, but not the speed. Doesn't look like the Df has the D4's bandwidth or something. I wonder how big a buffer it has, though? D600 fills up in no time.


By EricMartello on 11/7/2013 11:45:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Well, hello! Speed and low-light performance is exactly what I'd be looking for if buying a full-frame. If you;re looking for a bazillion pixels, many compact cameras will indulge.


The D800 has a noticeable edge in low light image quality, dynamic range, resolution and overall image quality over the D4...and it's less than 1/2 the price. The D4's real advantages over the D800 are A/F speed and accuracy (especially in lower lighting and higher f-stops) along with its rapid-fire 11 FPS shooting.

The Df costs the same as a D800 so I'd be hard pressed to choose it over the latter. It will not be as capable as the D4 nor the D800, so it really does seem like an appeal to the leica crowd who likes spending a lot of money on things "just cuz they can" despite there being better performing options at the same price level.

There is a diminishing returns element that kicks in with sensor size and megapixels (pixel density), and so a 40 MP fingernail size sensor in most phones and compact cameras will not capture anywhere close to the detail of a 35mm sensor.


By Monkey's Uncle on 11/5/2013 12:15:20 PM , Rating: 2
I kinda like it. The dials get the less used functions out of your way while leaving the most used functions right there for you. Then plus getting the body down to a sane size for an FX sensor is also a big plus.

Very rugged build, but I shudder at the rice tag. But I get it, quality costs big bucks and this is a very high quality camera indeed.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By nafhan on 11/5/2013 1:03:12 PM , Rating: 2
Go ahead and explain what's bad about dials. I'll probably disagree, but I'm interested in hearing.

I'm also missing why the D800 is a better camera. Are you basing that on the number of megapixels by any chance?


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By Motoman on 11/5/2013 1:39:54 PM , Rating: 2
Dials are old. Touchscreens are new. Therefore, touchscreens are better than dials.

This is the way vastly too many people actually think.


By Monkey's Uncle on 11/5/2013 3:03:11 PM , Rating: 3
Agree that way too many people equate the menu-driven interfaces as 'better'. Thankfully these are also not the folks that would consider a camera of this level (thank god!).

I personally approve wholeheartedly of the simple, down to business interface of this camera as it takes me back to Nikon's top end F series 35mm cameras. No BS.

Looking at the dials I see: Shutter speed, mode (PSAM), drive mode,ISO and exp compensation -- All things I would want to access quickly, and with Nikon's older lenses I would expect to be able to manually access my aperture ring as well.

I'm really happy to see all that. I'm glad I can't afford one. I'm not a pro and can't write it off.


RE: retro for the sake of retro
By nafhan on 11/5/2013 3:04:00 PM , Rating: 2
Hmmm, the type of person who doesn't like dials is probably just going to leave an SLR on auto all the time.

That may be why the dials seem like useless and old fashioned.


By Monkey's Uncle on 11/5/2013 3:09:55 PM , Rating: 2
Ima thinking that is the point moto was trying to make ;)

The kind of person that leaves his camera on auto all the time would no doubt look for something with a little more automation & toys like the D800. They most certainly wouldn't be spending pro-level bucks on one of these babies.


By EricMartello on 11/5/2013 11:25:51 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Go ahead and explain what's bad about dials. I'll probably disagree, but I'm interested in hearing.


Dials and physical buttons are good. Main reason is that you can change settings on the fly, like AF mode, ISO, exposure comp and such without having to tab through menus. Your chances of capturing quality shots goes up substantially.

quote:
I'm also missing why the D800 is a better camera. Are you basing that on the number of megapixels by any chance?


In the D800's case, its high resolution (megapixels) is undoubtedly an asset. The sensor in the D800 has some of the highest DR (dynamic range) in any digital camera and arguably the highest usable DR of any DSLR currently on the market.


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