NemeriX chip can receive signals from GPS, GLONASS and Galileo GPS systems at the same time

GPS-enabled products are increasingly common and GPS capability is one of the most popular features on current Smartphones. Adding GPS functionality to devices makes them more useful for consumers, but also makes them larger and consumer more power leading to reduced battery life.

Fabless semiconductor firm NemeriX has been granted U.S. patent number 7,358,896 covering its new multiband GNSS receiver. The receiver is capable of receiving parallel signals from GPS, GLONASS and Galileo satellite constellations.

The receiver is fully programmable and uses a single frequency synthesizer. The highly integrated design of the receiver allows NemeriX to reduce the silicon size and still acquire up to three signals on different frequency bands at the same time.

The receiver can also be programmed to tune to filtering levels and frequency plans as well. NemeriX says that the receiver was originally designed to meet the needs in the high-end and space market. The receiver will also allow manufacturers to address future consumer applications and provide new services in different bands like L2C. DailyTech first covered L2C in 2006 shortly after the U.S. government activated the first new satellite supporting the technology.

L2C was touted for its ability to deliver better communications via cell phone in areas where signals were unstable. The technology was also able to deliver better GPS signals for users in urban areas and indoors while requiring less power to receive the signal making for better battery life in mobile devices.

NemeriX VP marketing Lew Boore said in a statement, “By providing a highly integrated solution for multi-band signal environments, NemeriX is ready to deliver the next wave of GNSS performance. This latest technology innovation from NemeriX provides our customers with a future-proof platform for a greatly enhanced user experience, increased availability and accuracy for high demand applications, including emerging location based services such as pedestrian navigation and mobile social-based networking."

"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer
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