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Companies betting on iPad-like products from Dell and HP

Apple has had a pretty good week. They've become the most valuable tech company with their $221.1 billion market cap that beat Microsoft's $219.2 billion, and Apple shares closed down $1.17 to $244.05 while Microsoft's fell $1.06 to $25.01. What Apple CEO Steve Jobs might not be so happy about is the tough audience of some media firms he faced in Hollywood who voiced some bitter opinions about the iPad not having Adobe Flash Player available. 

Media companies like NBC Universal and Time Warner made statements concerning upcoming touch-screen tablet devices from Dell and Hewlett-Packard that will more than likely carry Adobe Flash Player, and made it clear that "they won't retool their extensive video libraries to accommodate the iPad."

Apple and Big Media have been battling this Flash war in hopes of reaching a negotiation at some point. Jobs has cited several reasons as to why he won't use Flash, such as Adobe Flash products being 100 percent proprietary, security issues, Adobe's request to be a third-party developer to create apps, and their lack of support for touch-based services. 

Instead, Apple uses HTML5 as their video software, which is the next major revision of HTML and aims to reduce the need for proprietary plug-in-based rich Internet application technologies, such as Flash. At the Hollywood conference amongst media firms, an Apple spokeswoman noted, "We believe in open standards like HTML5."

Media companies mentioned that software products like Google TV, which enables viewers to watch online video on their big-screen TV's, will cripple Apple's ability to dictate terms to media firms. In addition, media companies stated that switching to a Flashless iPad would be expensive to reformat and that it's "not be worth it because Flash dominates the Web."

While there are a lot of media firms that are pro-Flash, companies like Disney, CBS, Fox News and CNN have apps, shows and clips available using HTML5. While they only offer a handful of clips or shows, and some to a limited extent, it's some support, which was clearly not offered by those who criticized Jobs in the Hollywood conference.





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