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  (Source: True Slant)

  (Source: How Stuff Works)
Lunar land is "rich"; boasts water, mercury, silver and gold.

The moon could serve a much greater purpose than just being Earth's natural satellite. In November of last year, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced the discovery of lunar water. 

release by NASA and a report published today as six papers in the journal 
Science reveals that there is more water on its surface than was previously thought.  Members of NASA's Apollo missions space team also discovered trace amounts of silver, along with mercury, gold and other elements and compounds, on the near-side of the moon.

“We didn’t know the moon after all,” said Peter Schultz, a planetary geologist at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island and co-author of the papers. “It’s like there was a different face and it was hidden in a treasure trove.”

Scientists made the discovery after analyzing the findings of an experiment conducted last year when NASA deliberately slammed a rocket into a lunar crater. Traveling at nearly 6,000 miles per hour, the rocket burrowed 90 feet.  The impact tossed up lunar material six-feet deep.  

"There's this archive of billions of years (in the Moon's permanently shadowed craters)," Schultz said. "There could be clues there to our Earth's history, our solar system, our galaxy. And it's all just sitting there, this hidden history, just begging us to go back."

The quantity of water found was 50 percent more than was first estimated.

"It's really wet," said Anthony Colaprete, a space scientist at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif. and also a co-author of the 
Science papers. 

The moon is wet, scientists report, but the moon's hydrosphere is nothing like that of the Earth's. The total mass of the targeted lunar crater's soil is believed to contain roughly 5 percent of water ice. In some areas, water was confirmed as mostly pure ice crystals.

And while the moon's water supply has been described as sparse and not liquid, scientists believe that this latest data is promising enough to set up a station on the moon.

China, India and Japan are currently making plans to land on the lunar orb, but the U.S. won't take part in the effort for at least ten years. While President Barack Obama has given the go-ahead for a manned trip to Mars, he recently canceled a U.S. program aimed at returning astronauts to the moon. 

Japan hopes to set-up an unmanned base within a decade, China plans to send astronauts by 2025 and India has set its sights on a lunar landing by 2020.



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What?
By MrBungle123 on 10/22/2010 6:14:09 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Traveling at nearly 6,000 miles per hour, the rocket burrowed 90 feet. The impact tossed up lunar material six-feet deep.


Is it just me or does this make no sense?




RE: What?
By Souka on 10/22/2010 6:20:10 PM , Rating: 5
Bad phrasing of the thought.... But I think the purpose was that material that was 6ft under the surface is now exposed on the surface of the moon.

Also, a funny thought came across my mind when the below statement was made.
"The quantity of water found was 50 percent more than was first estimated"
My Thought: So it was originally estimated two drops of water on the moon, but now they realize there is three (50% more).

:)


RE: What?
By kontorotsui on 10/25/2010 6:23:05 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Is it just me or does this make no sense?


Of course it doesn't. Miles and feet are meaningless metrics in physics.


RE: What?
By Schrag4 on 10/25/2010 1:23:45 PM , Rating: 2
I agree that moving decimals around is easy, but punching buttons on a calculator really isn't that hard either. Just sayin...


RE: What?
By SoCalBoomer on 10/26/2010 6:15:05 PM , Rating: 2
dug a hole 90 feet deep leaving a "berm" about 6 feet deep surrounding the crater. . .


Freddie
By The Raven on 10/22/2010 6:46:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Members of NASA's Apollo missions space team also discovered trace amounts of silver, along with mercury , gold and other elements and compounds, on the near-side of the moon.

Mercury on the Moon?!!
Next they'll be telling us that there is green cheese on Mercury?




RE: Freddie
By Callmeaslut on 10/22/2010 7:45:20 PM , Rating: 3
Mercury? No "Unobtanium!"

It's okay, the budget has been slashed and we won't be going anywhere anytime soon (or even in a little while). Hell, we won't even be going to the ISS after next year by our self.


RE: Freddie
By FaceMaster on 10/22/2010 7:49:51 PM , Rating: 2
As long as there aren't blue aliens we'll be fine.


RE: Freddie
By quiksilvr on 10/22/10, Rating: 0
RE: Freddie
By Gio6518 on 10/23/2010 10:16:45 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
Did they say...Gold?


thats what i heard, but then, i sadly heard...

quote:
China, India and Japan are currently making plans to land on the lunar orb, but the U.S. won't take part in the effort for at least ten years. While President Barack Obama has given the go-ahead for a manned trip to Mars, he recently canceled a U.S. program aimed at returning astronauts to the moon.


RE: Freddie
By Exelius on 10/26/2010 10:15:08 AM , Rating: 2
The reason for this is that commercial rocketry is really getting its legs. NASA would be better off investing in commercial space startups than developing their own rockets. There are a number of space startups with cash burns between $5 million and $30 million while being close to a viable product; NASA's Ares program is projected around $40 billion and it's not even close to complete.

From a cost-benefit perspective, space development has reached the point where it's commercially viable. Look at some of the awesome stuff Armadillo Aerospace has done with just around $5 million (which is nothing for a software company, much less a company doing rocket science.)


Obamacare and Arab outreach..
By hellokeith on 10/23/2010 12:27:15 AM , Rating: 4
are much more important than the moon.




RE: Obamacare and Arab outreach..
By Gio6518 on 10/23/2010 10:26:41 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
are much more important than the moon.


Not really sure why you got rated down...It's a fair assesment. Space exploration and colonization should be first priority.


RE: Obamacare and Arab outreach..
By Nfarce on 10/23/2010 4:29:11 PM , Rating: 2
Yep. Especially considering all the people who bed wet over Bush talking about Mars exploration plans. Now that Obama is in office, nary a peep on anything regarding space and tax payer dollars.


Official water count
By KIAman on 10/22/2010 6:42:22 PM , Rating: 2
So the official water amount went from "negligible" to an astounding, "drop."




RE: Official water count
By Souka on 10/22/2010 7:24:27 PM , Rating: 2
that would mean 1 drop = 1.5 x negligible

I think my post above is more accurate to their findings.... 3 drops ;)


RE: Official water count
By HopDavid on 10/23/2010 6:09:41 PM , Rating: 2
You're wrong.

LRO and Chandrayaan-1 radar have detected what seems to be sheets of relatively pure ice at least two meters thick .
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Mini-RF/multimed...

While the LCROSS didn't impact an area with elevated CPR it did toss out ejecta with more than 3 drops.


RE: Official water count
By Souka on 10/25/2010 12:06:40 PM , Rating: 3
*sigh*... you missed the point.

This article just said "%50 more ice" but nothing else...

It's called humor HopDavid....


By kosmokenny on 10/23/2010 2:56:37 AM , Rating: 5
"It's really wet"




By putergeek00 on 10/27/2010 10:38:13 AM , Rating: 2
"It's all slippery!"


Didn't we sent some people up there?
By JeffCos on 10/23/2010 9:50:15 PM , Rating: 2
Sounds to me like Shepard should have taken some soil samples instead of playing golf, maybe we would have known this 40 years ago.




By HopDavid on 10/23/2010 10:35:30 PM , Rating: 2
The Apollo landings were in lower latitudes.

The water rich cold traps are at the poles.


Dahhh!!
By muIIet on 10/23/2010 11:17:25 AM , Rating: 1
It rains there all the time, what's the big surprise.




FIRST!
By RugMuch on 10/22/10, Rating: -1
"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -- Isaac Asimov














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