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State Senator Jane Cunningham (R-Chesterfield) said teachers are misunderstanding the new law  (Source: wordpress.com)
A new Missouri state law, which takes effect on August 28, will forbid teachers from having "exclusive access" with students who have not yet graduated (or are minors) on Internet sites

A Missouri teachers group filed a lawsuit on Friday to battle a new measure that restricts teachers from contacting students on social networking sites.

A new Missouri state law, which takes effect on August 28, will forbid teachers from having "exclusive access" with students who have not yet graduated (or are minors) on Internet sites. The law aims to prevent inappropriate contact between teachers and students by restricting outside-of-school contact to email and texts, as long as "someone is copied," and to public sites that can be viewed by parents, administrators or the public. In other words, no private messages, such as those on Facebook. It was put in place after an Associated Press investigation found that 87 Missouri teachers had lost their licenses between 2001 and 2005 due to sexual misconduct.

In response to this measure, the Missouri State Teachers Association filed a lawsuit against the state, Gov. Jay Nixon and Attorney General Chris Koster on Friday saying that the new law violates free speech and other constitutional rights.

"[The law] is so vague and overbroad that the plaintiffs cannot know with confidence what conduct is permitted and what it prohibited and thereby 'chills' the exercise of first amendment rights of speech, association, religion, collective bargaining and other constitutional rights by school teachers," states the lawsuit.

The Missouri State Teachers Association added that some students require the contact available on social networking sites because they are either too shy to speak to the teacher directly, or want to address sensitive issues like problems with homework and bullying.

Missouri teachers also noted that the law, being ambiguous in their opinion, could go as far as forbidding teachers from having a Facebook altogether.

"It doesn't stop any avenue of communication whatsoever," said State Senator Jane Cunningham (R-Chesterfield), who supports the new law. "It only prohibits hidden communication between educators and minors who have not graduated."

Cunningham also noted that the new law doesn't ban teachers from having a Facebook page altogether.

In addition to preventing teachers from communicating exclusively with individual students on social sites, the law will require schools to release information regarding a teacher who has sexually abused students in other school districts. It will allow a lawsuit if a teacher were to come from another school district where he or she sexually abused a student, and the school did not disclose this information and the employee committed the act once again. Missouri teachers were on board with this part of the law.

This bill was supported by many educational organizations including the Missouri State Teachers Association, and it won a large amount of support in the Legislature this year. But according to Missouri State Teachers Association spokesman Todd Fuller, the teachers focused on the bill as a whole and didn't realize the smaller aspects such as social media restrictions until recently. He added that other parts of the legislation were emphasized when lawmakers were considering it.

According to Reuters, Missouri state school districts must "adopt new policies" to comply with the law starting January 1, 2012.




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seems reasonable
By Samus on 8/22/2011 11:54:21 AM , Rating: 3
Why the hell would a K-12 teacher ever need to contact a student outside of class? They are minors, go through their guardians. This is no different than teachers having students private cell phone numbers and talking to them after school. Huge gray area.




RE: seems reasonable
By cjohnson2136 on 8/22/2011 12:00:18 PM , Rating: 2
What if it is the student that needs to talk to the teacher about something sensitive that they would rather not have someone hear while in school?

I knew plenty of kids in high school that were bullied and didn't say something because they were scared someone else would hear and it would escalate.


RE: seems reasonable
By Samus on 8/22/2011 12:08:38 PM , Rating: 2
You're ok with your kids talking to a teacher at 11PM in a private facebook chat?


RE: seems reasonable
By cjohnson2136 on 8/22/2011 12:10:36 PM , Rating: 2
I am not saying all communicate is ok. I think more that the school should be allowed to closely monitor the teacher's account more then just taking it out all together. Plus you can't fault the teacher if the kid is the one starting the contact.


RE: seems reasonable
By XZerg on 8/22/2011 12:24:30 PM , Rating: 2
I think that's something we can live with. Can't have kids talking to teachers on facebook or vice versa - wasn't necessary in my days and don't see it necessary today either. If it is related to homework - that's what friends are for or wait till next day. If it is related to bullying - either go to parents or teacher in person during school time. If it related to family issues, even then wait for school time.


RE: seems reasonable
By icemansims on 8/22/2011 12:39:14 PM , Rating: 5
That's right, because the majority, or maybe even all teachers are pedophiles and need to be guarded every minute to make sure they don't molest their students.

Okay, sarcasm aside, this is silly. In high school, we had weekend and summer programs that had basically "unsupervised" time with teachers that they set up for both ends of the spectrum, the "gifted" and the "special" students. They were completely voluntary and extra-curricular and open to a large number of students. These people weren't out to abuse kids. They were TEACHERS and they did the job because they LOVED IT.

You know why this is coming about now? Where I came from, while I was growing up, teachers were a hot commodity, and was a relatively lucrative job.
Now, it's on the low end of the spectrum, and, those people who would love to teach, me included, won't because it simply doesn't make financial sense. You want to fix it? Don't treat teachers like they're pedophiles, don't pay them a pittance, and don't act like they're second class citizens. Make it a profession people are PROUD to have again.


RE: seems reasonable
By tastyratz on 8/22/2011 1:59:10 PM , Rating: 2
Absolutely. Just because people might not have had digital communications back in the day or modern writing utensils does not mean stone age = safe. Teachers are entrusted alone with the students be it detention, class, a few minutes for a word after, or summer school. Opportunities exist abound and if one is to be abused this is not the sole avenue.
I agree that some transparency needs to be in place but this is all public officials entrusted with our children's safety, not relegated to teachers alone. This is not setting our children up for success in hopes of protecting the few.


RE: seems reasonable
By MrBlastman on 8/22/2011 2:33:22 PM , Rating: 3
The problem is that by allowing a teacher to communicate via facebook or other unsanctioned (but documentable) mediums sets the school and teacher up for litigation. We must remember that in our voraciously litigious society, things that might foster an extended relationship lead to an intense amount of liability as well.

Our society created this problem with the overreliance on lawyers and the courts to decide things rather than face to face contact and reason.


RE: seems reasonable
By The Raven on 8/24/2011 12:40:52 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The problem is that by allowing a teacher to communicate via facebook or other unsanctioned (but documentable) mediums sets the school and teacher up for litigation . We must remember that in our voraciously litigious society, things that might foster an extended relationship lead to an intense amount of liability as well.
The teacher can make that call until there is probable cause for them to be prosecuted as a potential child molester (i.e. need for search warrants).

It is not my job nor the job of the gov't to protect the teacher from their own decisions.


RE: seems reasonable
By tastyratz on 8/24/2011 4:00:42 PM , Rating: 2
http://www.theonion.com/articles/lonely-teacher-ou... I found myself needing to insert this inappropriate but relevant link for this article


RE: seems reasonable
By The Raven on 8/24/2011 5:51:54 PM , Rating: 2
The Onion never let's us down.

Inappropriate?! This couldn't be more appropriate! If they ban Facebook use in this way, such endearing stories would never happen. Won't someone please think of the (lonely, outcast) children!!

P.S. Facebook wasn't mentioned in this article. ;-P


RE: seems reasonable
By MrBlastman on 8/22/2011 1:30:39 PM , Rating: 3
Kids need to learn to "suck it up" and learn to "deal with it" on a personal level. If they are too afraid to go to an administrator or take it upon themselves to solve it personally (i.e. fight the kid in the hall or playground, fist to fist like we did it back in my days in school), then they should face the consequences of said inaction.

Yes, that's right. They deserve to get the poop kicked out of them.

If people don't learn to stand up for themselves in gradeschool, they never will except in rare cases. There are some that will and I applaud them, but learning this lesson early on in life will only help them later on.

There's no reason they should hide behind an instant messenger or facebook. Back when I was a kid, if a kid did want to hide, they'd tell their parents and then the father would have a "personal" talk with the other kids father to solve the problem amicably. Yeah, that's right, we didn't get lawyers involved either back then.

As for grades and studying--they should have no fear at all asking the teacher for help in person. If the teacher refuses to help after hours, or refer them to a tutor, then of course it can be brought up with the school system in a reasonable fashion.

The point I'm trying to get across here is kids need to be taught to be accountable and to take action to solve their own problems. I'm tired of this whole societal need to text or message or email everyone. It is as if people in this world are afraid to approach something uncomfortable over the phone or in person. It will only complicate things further and make getting anything productive done much harder to do in the future.


RE: seems reasonable
By maven81 on 8/22/2011 1:45:41 PM , Rating: 1
"It is as if people in this world are afraid to approach something uncomfortable over the phone or in person."

Hang on... did you just say it would be better for a student to be calling a teacher or stalking them to talk in person then it would to communicate via something like facebook?! You're as confused as the geniuses that put together this law. On the one hand they fear that teachers interacting with students will lead to inappropriate relationships. On the other they basically push them from informal online only communication to in person communication? That makes no sense. Nor is there anything inherently wrong in this facebook communication. I know of several such cases, and it's basically students wanting to share something they don't feel comfortable sharing in front of everyone. Big deal.

Now as for your "suck it up" attitude, I don't think I even have to tell you how off base that is.


RE: seems reasonable
By MrBlastman on 8/22/2011 2:21:34 PM , Rating: 3
No. Where did I say for them to call the teacher? The Student can meet with the teacher after hours in the school. All communication will take place either in person at the school or via email (channels that can be documented by the school).

My wife is a teacher and she never, ever talks with students outside of school. She may speak with parents, however. If she does communicate via email, typically all emails are copied to her boss to both protect her, the school and the parents.

What's wrong with "sucking it up?" It is called "manning up" in other slang. It is not offbase at all--that is, unless you are a wimp, a worm or completely incompetent.


RE: seems reasonable
By AwesomeDuck on 8/22/2011 4:58:12 PM , Rating: 1
Right, so the kid who gets picked on by almost everyone should "stand up" for himself and try to kick the other kids' asses? That's not a battle any moderately intelligent person would choose. Additionally, many schools now implement zero tolerance rules regarding violence in the classroom. I was suspended for a week and narrowly escaped a $100 fine just for slapping a guy in the face, or "standing up for myself". What you suggest may have been practical back in the before time, but now everything gets turned into something else and sparks even more animosity. What you suggest is no longer a viable solution.

Also, I had numerous teachers in high school that simply did not have time during the school day or immediately following school to spend the necessary time required to help with homework. It's not always something that can wait until the next day. Keeping these lines of communication open is vital to maintaining the academic success of today's youth. Especially considering the changing academic standards which grow more challenging every year.

Get your mind out of the gutter. Teachers are not perverts. To punish all teachers by restricting their rights is ridiculous. It should be up to the parents to maintain the integrity of any online communication, not the government.


RE: seems reasonable
By Reclaimer77 on 8/22/11, Rating: 0
RE: seems reasonable
By room200 on 8/22/2011 9:05:07 PM , Rating: 2
Uhh so nobody was a well adjusted and successful person before the Internet?? Friends and family is who you should be confiding things in after school hours. Teaching is a JOB, they get paid to do it. They didn't sign up to be 24/7 councilors and, frankly, I would question the emotional state of one who choose to take on that roll in an online environment.

That's just what you don't understand; in this day, we have taken on that role because it's what we need to create a better society. Many parents aren't doing it, and it's not like a tech job where you claim it's "not in my job description". Passionate teachers take on the role of mother, father, counselor, police officer, psychiatrist, doctor, etc., not because the job says so, but because the job demands it. Your way of thinking leads to people treating teachers like shit because everyone believes "Hey, I can teach because I've been a student."

There are so many jobs where you can simply turn it off. I'm an assistant principal, and have been one for 6 years. Before that, I was a classroom teacher for over a decade. I've removed splinters, bought children clothes, visted homes regularly, intervened (multiple times) when children have been molested at home, snatched our children out of a crowd of 90 adults and kids fighting with no police there (he wouldn't get his punk ass out of the car until "backup arrived"), fed children, gone to funerals of my murdered students, etc. Teaching is not that simple, at least, not for those of us who really care.


RE: seems reasonable
By Reclaimer77 on 8/23/2011 9:47:28 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Your way of thinking leads to people treating teachers like shit because everyone believes "Hey, I can teach because I've been a student."


I don't think that's fair to say.

My mother has been a career teacher since before I can remember. I think I have a firm grip on what's wrong with public schools and our society in general.

Teachers used to be able to maintain a professional distance from their students, as they should. You are advocating otherwise while molestation and sexual misconduct are steadily on the rise because that barrier has been eroded over time.

You talk about teachers as if they are, now, social workers. No wonder their pay and benefits suck so much. You don't think it's a job, but a lifestyle. I strongly refute that.


RE: seems reasonable
By AwesomeDuck on 8/23/2011 12:43:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
it's amazing anyone ever made it out of it alive


Clearly that was an extreme example. Not every experience is like that. Schools have changed. It isn't as simple as it used to be. It even changed from my freshman year to my senior year.

quote:
Uhh so nobody was a well adjusted and successful person before the Internet??


That was in response to the homework help suggestion. My parents aren't scientists or mathematicians, they generally couldn't assist me with calculus homework. Furthermore, society has changed. More people were willing to take time out of their schedules "back in the day", people are busier now, hence why ease of communication via the internet is so important.

quote:
Wasn't it worth keeping your self esteem? Plus I bet he didn't bully you anymore, did he?


He was a friend, and it's something I still regret. I know that I had other options to handle that situation (I acknowledge that there are times when this may be the only solution) and believe that many people who resort to "violence" do as well. At some point someone has to step up and be the bigger person.

quote:
Boys will be boys, and we actually used to understand that


I would with this most of the time. However, as I stated before, something simple always gets turned into something else. Twice in my academic career as a high school student did I experience a resolution of a situation as a result of a fight; my own experience, and another between classmates of mine who were also friends. The problem arises when two or more people or groups who were not friendly to begin with escalate their situation into a violent one. I was only suspended for a week (the "rules" called for two weeks and the fine) because I was a girl being harassed by a boy. The one time a "sexist" attitude has ever worked in my favor.
It's not just guys either. Many of the fights at my school took place between girls. I couldn't tell you the number of weaves I witnessed being ripped from someones head. I wish it was still as simple as "boys will be boys" or allowing a situation to be "resolved" between friends. But people can't handle themselves anymore.


RE: seems reasonable
By siberus on 8/22/2011 6:02:56 PM , Rating: 2
My brother is a teacher in a Canadian school board . I don't remember right now if it was his school board or his union that recommends not even handing out their emails as a form of protection against parental complaints. Makes parents think that teachers are on call and if they don't get an immediate response their kid is off the hook for not doing the work.


RE: seems reasonable
By The Raven on 8/24/2011 12:29:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The point I'm trying to get across here is kids need to be taught to be accountable and to take action to solve their own problems. I'm tired of this whole societal need to text or message or email everyone.

Although I am with you on the fact that kids need to buck up more than they are now (err...adults need to leave them be) do you propose this if they are being abused sexually or otherwise at home and don't have a strong social network via church or anything else but school? Call me crazy but kids don't always feel comfortable with calling 911 and getting their parents locked up. Sometimes a teacher or counselor is the way to go. I am not "every kid" so I can't make that call.

Facebook is just like any other communications method with its strengths and weaknesses. I believe that students and teachers should have the freedom to determine what they want to use to communicate. And if you personally don't think your kid should be on FB... then do your best to get them off of it. As for me, I'll let my kids use FB just like I let them use the phone.

You can't keep kids from making mistakes but you can overly limit their freedom so that they don't know how to behave when they do have unchecked access to it as an adult. And I'm cool with you all determining what "overly" means by yourselves.
quote:
It is as if people in this world are afraid to approach something uncomfortable over the phone or in person. It will only complicate things further and make getting anything productive done much harder to do in the future.
Though I agree that people seem greatly to be avoiding face to face communication these days, I think it is less an avoidance than an attraction to "the screen". I mean you can't talk face to face if you are looking at a screen. At any rate, I agree that we all just need to get off the social grid known as the Internet. It should be a tool and not a way of life.


RE: seems reasonable
By Reclaimer77 on 8/22/2011 3:43:31 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
You're ok with your kids talking to a teacher at 11PM in a private facebook chat?


No I'm not. As a parent, however, I would make the decision on that. But how is this law going to stop it? It's stupid, unconstitutional, and completely unenforceable. All it does it block legitimate lanes of communication, while the truly criminal teachers will keep doing it regardless. Because they always do it, and they always eventually get caught anyway.

You just seem like one of those vapid individuals who can't seem to question a law because to you someone somewhere is trying to "fix" a problem with it. So it's automatically a "reasonable" and right thing to do.

And oh yeah, hey you, Jane Cunningham!! Yeah, YOU . Either become a Democrat or stop trying to ruin our party with this kind of nonsense.


RE: seems reasonable
By dxf2891 on 8/22/2011 3:52:58 PM , Rating: 4
Why is your kid up at 11 pm on Facebook without your knowledge?


RE: seems reasonable
By Samus on 8/23/2011 12:22:19 AM , Rating: 1
You know whats unenforcable? Your kid on Facebook.


RE: seems reasonable
By quiksilvr on 8/22/2011 12:21:30 PM , Rating: 2
That's what (proper) school counselors are for...m'kay?


RE: seems reasonable
By Hyperion1400 on 8/22/2011 1:30:44 PM , Rating: 2
Where I went to school, we had 2 counselors for 1500 students. It is simply not feasible for them to deal with a student body of that size.


RE: seems reasonable
By maven81 on 8/22/2011 1:52:04 PM , Rating: 3
Now imagine an NYC public school with 4,000 students heh.

I'm pretty baffled at some of the comments here. In my experience students have always come to their teachers for advice. Particularly in cases where they are too embarrassed or scared to talk to their parents, and are looking for more insight then they can get from their friends. Yet quite a few people here are acting like this never happens.


RE: seems reasonable
By MrBlastman on 8/22/2011 2:27:03 PM , Rating: 2
Sure, it happens. However, the bigger problem is the hippie movement of "coddling" that has detracted from children growing up to be strong, solid individuals. Instead, if they are afraid to speak their mind, then they suffer the consequences of it. This is life.

Parents, likewise, should not abuse, belittle or trash their kids for coming to them with something uncomfortable. Now, if the kid is being ridiculous (anyone with kids knows they certainly can be), it is up to the parent to guide them towards being a more responsible and reasonable individual. They should also educate and enhance their mind and intellect where appropriate also--not just ignore them and pretend they don't exist.

A firm but loving hand--Far too often does society forget that it builds character and a stronger person.


RE: seems reasonable
By 91TTZ on 8/22/2011 2:26:06 PM , Rating: 2
Then you tell the teacher after class, the way people did long before they had Facebook.


RE: seems reasonable
By FITCamaro on 8/22/2011 3:41:56 PM , Rating: 1
How about they either learn to deal with it or tell their parents and let it be addressed from there?

I love how bullying is treated as if it has never been happening in the past.


RE: seems reasonable
By Dr of crap on 8/22/2011 12:30:18 PM , Rating: 2
Not only that but why is the union outraged?

If people behaved as they did in say the 1960 or 1970 there would be no problem with this law if social media did exist back then. This country is falling fast and this is a classis example.

I agree what else besides emailing does a teacher NEED to contact a student??????


RE: seems reasonable
By GatoRat on 8/22/2011 12:45:01 PM , Rating: 4
For many students, establishing a raport with a teacher often makes a big difference in that student's life. Many students associate with teachers outside the classroom. This is most noticeable in the creative arts (art, writing, etc) but also technical. This also includes things such as boy and girl scouts, mentoring and church programs.


RE: seems reasonable
By BruceLeet on 8/22/2011 2:23:43 PM , Rating: 2
Apparently one of the teachers at a Missouri school is also a mother of one of the schools pupils, so this law would make it illegal for her to contact/communicate with her own child over Facebook because the law is so 'vague'

Better detailed here http://www.courthousenews.com/2011/08/22/MoTeachCA...


Bobblehead?
By XZerg on 8/22/2011 12:21:26 PM , Rating: 2
Is it me or does the picture of the woman looks so much like a bobblehead - bigger than her rest of the body. This could be a bad photographing job or maybe a reality.




RE: Bobblehead?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 8/22/2011 12:29:26 PM , Rating: 2
It's the "poofed" hairstyle.


RE: Bobblehead?
By ClownPuncher on 8/22/2011 12:41:49 PM , Rating: 1
Or, sometimes called, the "Bible-belt neo-bouffant".


RE: Bobblehead?
By ClownPuncher on 8/23/2011 2:38:01 PM , Rating: 2
Yep, totally distasteful comment...


RE: Bobblehead?
By frobizzle on 8/23/2011 8:30:08 AM , Rating: 1
Besides the bobble-head hair, she is the typical right wing hypocrite.
quote:
"It doesn't stop any avenue of communication whatsoever," said State Senator Jane Cunningham (R-Chesterfield), who supports the new law.

Uh, whatever happened to the GOP trumpeting that we need less government intrusion in our lives? That we do not need "big brother" watching over our shoulders?

As I said, hypocrite!


Dealing with bees with a bazooka.
By KainTFM on 8/22/2011 12:14:43 PM , Rating: 3
Yet another drastic overreaction from local government over a non-issue. Hundreds of thousands of people die in car accidents each year. Hundreds of thousands of people die from being smokers, from cancer, from heart disease. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people are raped. Millions of citizens are burglarized in some way every year, and I'm only speaking of the U.S. here.

How many acts of sexual misconduct occurred on a yearly basis here? 15? Out of how many tens of thousands of teachers? It's like Columbine all over again. 1 incident does not equal an epidemic, and does not require acts of legislation. In this case, nor does 80 accounts over 5 years.




By Dr of crap on 8/22/2011 12:32:40 PM , Rating: 2
I agree - but why would the union OBJECT to the law?

It only makes common sense!

They should just accept it and move on!
There are some many more important things to deal with!


By dxf2891 on 8/22/2011 3:57:25 PM , Rating: 2
The same year that Columbine happened, more than 300 shootings in or around schools in L.A. were reported. Over 450 in New York. And 638 in Chicago. But you never heard a peep. Why, because those were sparsed out over the course of the year in innercity schools and not in a quiet suburb.


That is a very stupid law
By BZDTemp on 8/22/2011 5:23:45 PM , Rating: 3
Once again common sense and a piece freedom gets lost due to some paranoid people. It's a slippery slope and it's good someone is trying to stop the paranoia.




RE: That is a very stupid law
By cparka23 on 8/22/2011 6:13:57 PM , Rating: 2
Yes, there are plenty of stupid laws out there.

Also in Missouri, there are laws that declare a home in which 5 unrelated women live together a brothel. I had to explain that one to a girl's father when he asked where the girls' dorms are.


Her picture reminds me of something...
By Spookster on 8/22/2011 10:24:23 PM , Rating: 2
Oh yeah this is what her photo reminds me of:
http://xfinitytv.comcast.net/blogs/wp-content/post...




By whickywhickyjim on 8/23/2011 11:48:04 AM , Rating: 2
more like lord helmet from spaceballs. That's an enormous coif of hair.


In FL...
By cmdrdredd on 8/22/2011 6:25:38 PM , Rating: 3
There's some new rules that say it's illegal for a student on school grounds to give their friend a high five, a hug, a slap on the back to welcome or say hi to them, or a friendly slug in the shoulder among buddies.

The nanny state has arrived. Lets make all our kids pussies so they'll roll over and play dead when there's a world crisis and they're asked to stand up and do something.




This says it all...
By vortmax2 on 8/22/2011 1:40:24 PM , Rating: 2
"This bill was supported by many educational organizations including the Missouri State Teachers Association, and it won a large amount of support in the Legislature this year. But according to Missouri State Teachers Association spokesman Todd Fuller, the teachers focused on the bill as a whole and didn't realize the smaller aspects such as social media restrictions until recently..."

Someone needs to read the 'fine print' a little better...




lol
By voodoochile123 on 8/22/2011 5:54:46 PM , Rating: 2
lol she has such big hair!




By foolsgambit11 on 8/22/2011 8:04:13 PM , Rating: 2
When it comes to the supposed benefits of Facebook PMs between students and teachers, the same benefits can be achieved by the student contacting the teacher by their work e-mail. Then, there will be a readily-accessible record of the communication on the school's server, which provides for accountability. Where teachers have remote access to their school e-mail, this method is every bit as effective as Facebook.

There may be problems with the wording of the law being overly vague, which would lead to free speech issues, but the general intent of the law doesn't adversely affect a teacher's ability to address student concerns in a private manner. Appropriately "private", that is.




A few thoughts
By wordsworm on 8/22/2011 9:05:21 PM , Rating: 2
If they do this for teacher-student communication, they should be consistent and make the same rules across the board. That means that priests should also not be allowed to communicate privately with young people. Police ought to be restricted as well. And, most importantly, don't let family be friends with kids on Facebook. After all, statistically, it's family members who are the most dangerous.

Well, I don't live in the states, so these rules don't affect me. I am 'friends' with two students. One of the students has her own account, the other shares hers with her mother (because she's only eight years old). I have a separate Facebook account which I use exclusively for this purpose and for communicating with other teachers, posting pics related to my job, etc. The last thing I need is students and parents reading posts covering my private life or political activism.




facebook law
By mildredfowler on 8/24/2011 5:48:53 AM , Rating: 2
The problem that need to be addressed is not a communication-related dilemma, but rather it is a boundary solution that must be met. http://bit.ly/q6iHzc




missing some points
By KOOLTIME on 8/24/2011 7:21:30 PM , Rating: 2
Also consider that more then teacher student abuse, is kids home abuse, and these types of contacts are more often used when it occurs. Most kids are abused at home, then being abuse by a teacher in sheer numbers cases. teachers are supposed to and required in most states by law to report them to local police / social services.

Teacher is not going to contact a parent in these cases, they are helping the child to stay safe until further help can be gotten, especially since most occur after hours when they are at home at night.

Social media sites are not needed though, then parent should be aware of what their kids do on the computer anyways after school. If not the parents are retards / negligent for allowing their kids access to places adults troll.




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