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This is the total from both tablet launches until June 30

Microsoft has been pretty stingy about revealing sales numbers for its Surface RT and Surface Pro tablets, but the Windows maker finally threw a number out there -- just one. 

From the launch of the Surface RT tablet (October 26, 2012) and the launch of the Surface Pro tablet (February 9, 2013) until the end of the company's fiscal year on June 30, Microsoft said Surface tablet sales came out to a total of $853 million USD. 

Microsoft failed to mention which portion of those sales were Surface RT sales and which were Surface Pros.

In an 8-month period, Microsoft sold 1.7 million Surface tablets -- which doesn't look too good sitting next to Apple's numbers. Last November, Apple sold 3 million iPads in just three days around the holiday shopping period. 

In addition, Apple sold 14.6 million iPads in the last quarter alone, and a total of 57 million iPads since the launch of the Surface RT in October. 


Earlier this month, Microsoft took a $900 million charge on the Surface due to the flop in sales. Microsoft also dropped the price of the Surface RT by $150 USD. 

Last month, Microsoft was basically giving Surface RTs away. It announced that it was giving away 10,000 Surface RT tablets to teachers at the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). The idea was to spread RT adoption in schools by supplying teachers with the devices and even training them how to use it. 

Days later, Microsoft introduced the "Microsoft Surface for education limited time offer," which will give discounted Surface RTs to schools and colleges interested in adopting the tablets.

The offer, which will reportedly run until August 31, 2013, will sell Surface RTs (without keyboards) to schools for only $199. If the schools want a touch keyboard with their Surface RT, the total price is $249. With a type keyboard, the cost is $289. 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, analysts had hoped for earnings of around 75 cents per share ($6.33 billion USD) on revenue of $20.73 billion USD (not including the Surface write-down).  Instead they got earnings of around 66 cents per share ($5.56 billion USD) once the Surface write-down was removed.

Sources: Neowin.net, Loop Insight





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MS forgot one key aspect
By talikarni on 7/31/13, Rating: 0
RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By lifewatcher on 7/31/2013 1:40:51 PM , Rating: 3
I think MS is losing due to their bullish approach. Perhaps they got inspired by the uber-bully Jobs? The difference is that Jobs was indeed talented and was sitting at the top of a massive cult. MS has no mindless followers. When they try to push something on me, my natural reaction is FU! I was thrilled about my Windows 8 phone, but the limitations MS has imposed on 3rd party developers is just annoying - no app can launch point-to-point navigation with spoken command; no app can check battery levels more than twice per hour... The desktop forcing me to go all "metro" still makes me mad, although the improvements performance-wise made me accept the compromise.

Maybe, when MS gets down to its last couple of billions, Balmer will be asked to consider other career options.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By enlil242 on 7/31/2013 2:44:33 PM , Rating: 2
Or they could have taken the same strategy they used with the Xbox and sell them at a loss to get marketshare. Just seeing how many webOS tablets sold when HP dropped the price to $200 was staggering.

They could have easily justified a $900 million loss for that, as opposed to overstock. I would have bought a Surface pro for $399. I'm holding out on Haswell, but the $999 for the base model is not an impulse buy figure I'm comfortable with...


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Tony Swash on 7/31/13, Rating: -1
RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By retrospooty on 7/31/2013 3:09:38 PM , Rating: 2
I agree... And if I agree with Tony, MS must really be screwing the pooch.

It amazes me how little they have learned about customer sat.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Reclaimer77 on 7/31/2013 8:41:50 PM , Rating: 2
I agree 100%. The apocalypse is upon us lol


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By damianrobertjones on 8/1/2013 3:39:12 AM , Rating: 2
"they don't want Office on their tablets and they don't want Windows 8 on their desktop."

I'm sorry but YOU do NOT speak for everyone! Windows 8 is very easy to use, easy to navigate and we, in this company, have no issues with the software. Just because YOU say it again and again will not make it so.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Tony Swash on 8/1/2013 5:48:15 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
"they don't want Office on their tablets and they don't want Windows 8 on their desktop."

I'm sorry but YOU do NOT speak for everyone! Windows 8 is very easy to use, easy to navigate and we, in this company, have no issues with the software. Just because YOU say it again and again will not make it so.


I understand that some will like Windows 8 and some will make the transition to it's new UI successfully and comfortably. But the question I would pose to you is this: What's it for? What problem of the customer does Windows 8 solve? What does it do significantly better for the customers than Windows 7?

(leaving aside the sort of base improvements such as speedier boot times, etc, that could have been delivered with traditional Windows UI).

I can't for the life of me see what Windows 8 delivers for the customer, I can see what Microsoft hoped it would deliver for Microsoft.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By GPig on 8/1/2013 9:51:27 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I can't for the life of me see what Windows 8 delivers for the customer


It delivered me a lovely little i7 hybrid that I develop on all day (plugged into an external monitor), that I can casual game on the train with, that I can flick around the internet comfortably on the couch with.

That is the point of Windows 8. There is no need for a tablet + laptop anymore.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By retrospooty on 8/1/2013 10:46:31 AM , Rating: 2
"That is the point of Windows 8. There is no need for a tablet + laptop anymore."

That is true to a point... But no-one is buying them. Not in any significant #'s. Hell, MS Alone just lost $900 million on their hybrid.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By NellyFromMA on 8/2/2013 10:47:45 AM , Rating: 2
It's a great mobile OS option for tablet form factors that dock into work stations or keyboard mouse inputs as needed.

It's usage as a replacement to workstations is negligible. On the other hand, if MS does nothing to answer the mobile sector, they continue to be seen as non-responsive and straight up ignorant to the facts and trends of the industry they used to command influence over.

They were bound to disappoint one way or the other which is perhaps the curse of being so large to begin with. Apple is starting to see this too and Google will be shortly behind it.

The fact is Microsoft isn't great in the mobile sector, an arguably much simpler world where 80% of the processes probably are handled by MS backends independent of the front end clients.

Perhaps they will listen and make the new UI an option, or at least allow a more functional start button.

Eh, damned if you do damned if you don't as far as I can tell. They are targeting two very different sectors with a single product.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Luticus on 8/1/2013 8:28:19 AM , Rating: 3
Maybe YOU view tablets as simple toys that you place on a coffee table and surf the web with but I definitely don't. You speak for yourself as I definitely want (and have) office on my tablet. To me a tablet is just a laptop with slightly more portability. For me Microsoft is aiming at the right target and their even using the right ammo... they just missed. They are simply becoming too much like apple with Nazi app stores and parts of the OS I can't mess with, wrong approach is all.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Tony Swash on 8/1/2013 9:05:36 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Maybe YOU view tablets as simple toys that you place on a coffee table and surf the web with but I definitely don't.


You responding to something I did not say and do not believe. I think touch based devices, particularly tablets, are very powerful and can not only replace PCs for a significant spectrum of activities (including many that fall under the umbrella of 'productivity') but can be used in ways that PCs cannot, unlocking entirely new use scenarios.

quote:
To me a tablet is just a laptop with slightly more portability.


Fine, but to most people they are not, they are something new and something that for many, many people are more useful than laptops or can be used in ways laptops cannot. Your cooker and refrigerator both do equally useful jobs, why combine them?

quote:
They are simply becoming too much like apple with Nazi app stores


Statements of total insanity and ridiculous hyperbole do not strengthen your argument, they just make you look a bit bonkers


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Luticus on 8/1/2013 9:17:30 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
but can be used in ways that PCs cannot, unlocking entirely new use scenarios.

... Agreed

quote:
Your cooker and refrigerator both do equally useful jobs, why combine them?


Hum, I dunno. Your cellphone and PDA/Pocket PC could do great jobs apart from each other, why don't we split them back up too? The answer is obvious... Why have 2 devices when I can have one. Less money, less power consumption, less to carry around, less juggling systems during my workflow. Now it just so happens that I do have a laptop, a tablet, and a desktop, and they all serve different purposes. My tablet, though, is no less capable than my laptop, it just runs Windows 8 Pro instead of Debian GNU/Linux.

My last statment is perfectly justified. Having someone else decide what apps I can and cannot install by choosing to filter them from the "app store" which is the only means of installing said "app"... Just plain sucks! It's my device and I'll install whatever I want on it! If I want to go into the applications folder and mess with the files then it is MY RIGHT to do so. There shouldn't be a single file on my system that is off limits to me, and if there is the system sucks! This is why I have been strategically switching all my stuff to Linux. It's about the only OS I trust these days.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Tony Swash on 8/1/2013 9:55:44 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
My last statment is perfectly justified. Having someone else decide what apps I can and cannot install by choosing to filter them from the "app store" which is the only means of installing said "app"... Just plain sucks! It's my device and I'll install whatever I want on it! If I want to go into the applications folder and mess with the files then it is MY RIGHT to do so.


You may not like the way Apple arranges things but nobody forces you to use their devices and there are plenty of alternatives. I don't like the way Google's uncurated model allows such a vast amount of malware to circulate on the Android platform nor the fact that the piracy it allows undermines developer revenues. So I don't buy Android devices and there are alternatives. The fact that different models for app systems are available is a good thing and the fact that some people strongly prefer one model to another is utterly unremarkable. To describe a particular way of doing things as 'Nazi' just because you don't like makes you sound like a ten year old.

BTW there are no application folders on iOS devices, you are referring to a file management system used in old style PCs, iOS devices don't have user file management systems. Lots of people really like that.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Luticus on 8/1/2013 10:34:49 AM , Rating: 2
iOS does have a file system of sorts... You just don't have access to it by default. File systems aren't used in only "old style PCs". Android, Windows, Linux Distros, Unix, and even Mac OSX all use a file system of some kind.

http://www.gumballtech.com/2010/10/26/access-the-e...

For the record it's not Apple's app model that bothers me. I'm perfectly fine with their app delivery system and understand it's "implied" benefits. It's not the system that makes me stray from apple devices, it's the management. The fact that developers can work hard on an app but just because the app isn't in moral alignment with apples way of thinking it gets pulled and all the money and resources spent developing it are now wasted (unless of course they subject their app to apple's censorship and resubmit it for approval)... Let me run that by you again, it's not that the app has any technical flaw or breaks anything it's just that apple doesn't "like" it... that's what pisses me off and why I refer to them as "Nazi". "Nazi" by the way is a word I normally avoid because typically I'm in agreement that people who use it sound immature. However in Apple's case it fits nicely and it's application is appropriate. You rule your platform with an iron fist... you're acting "Nazi" about it. I think that's a fair assessment.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By spread on 8/2/2013 8:25:11 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
BTW there are no application folders on iOS devices, you are referring to a file management system used in old style PCs, iOS devices don't have user file management systems. Lots of people really like that.


Wow. That is the dumbest thing I have heard today.

iOS devices do indeed have file systems and all computers which must read and write for storage have a file system to manage the recording and retrieval of that data.

iOS devices when jailbroken can have a file explorer app installed with which to browse the file system.

You sir are an idiot.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By spread on 8/2/2013 8:29:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Statements of total insanity and ridiculous hyperbole do not strengthen your argument, they just make you look a bit bonkers


Says the guy who claims that Apple devices don't use file systems. Says the guy who doesn't know how a basic computer operates. Says the guy who has feelings for a corporation, kind of like that chick on My Strange Addiction is married to the eiffel tower. That was messed up Tony.

You should be on that show.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By w8gaming on 8/1/2013 9:20:08 AM , Rating: 2
Well, if Office is really that important to the market segment that wants a tablet, Surface RT will not have been such a flop. To some people, yes, this is exactly what they need. But this group is a minority. MS cannot use this same strategy of trying to break into mobile segment with Office alone. Different approach is needed.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Luticus on 8/1/2013 9:42:18 AM , Rating: 2
I realize that not "everyone" needs office on a tablet, you should also realize that there are more office solutions that just Microsoft office. Android sports Kingsoft and several others, and Linux and other platforms have Libre Office. While these are not as powerful as Microsoft office they can get the job done for most people and do serve as viable alternatives that can be found on multiple platforms. My point is that office doesn't sell Windows. office is the single best "app" Win RT has and we all see how that's working out for them. The only reason I mentioned office at all is because it was mentioned by the guy I was replying to. It could have been anything really. AutoCAD, Maya, Photoshop, etc., and my answer would have been the same.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By NellyFromMA on 8/2/2013 10:52:14 AM , Rating: 2
I think charging to develop for RT is a huge downfall on MS part. If they want to spread adoption then they need to open the platform up entirely. It was ok for them to try right now and perhaps the downfall of now opening it up would be they would essentially commit corporate suicide if they ever tried to charge again. However, right now MS needs explosive adoption the way Android catapulted from a real ugly open source option to a truly better OS overall as compared to iOS, the mobile leader of the moment.

I think people would easily ditch the Android platform if another viable open-dev solution existed. MS just doesn't have the cool factor to charge upfront to develop on a platform they have yet to convince the masses on.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By synapse46 on 8/1/2013 8:43:24 AM , Rating: 2
There are alternative locked down tablets with limited app sotres for much less, is the problem.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By synapse46 on 8/1/2013 9:37:30 AM , Rating: 2
There is also the possibility the device may become stranded.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By spread on 7/31/2013 11:33:37 PM , Rating: 2
Apple gained much praise when they released the first iPhone and they carried that momentum as others tried and failed to make decent phones.

There are very few good phones out there on the market, but the iPhone is a good default if you don't know what to get. It's not filled with carrier bloat, it actually runs, it works on the internet with most sites, very trouble free and looks nice too.

Apple fires on all cylinders. Microsoft starts out bullish and they don't execute all the way or try and change something basic that people love and try to force it down their throats and ruin everything. So of course people aren't going to buy what Microsoft is selling. They're not stupid.


RE: MS forgot one key aspect
By Argon18 on 8/2/2013 10:28:32 AM , Rating: 2
"MS has no mindless followers." Umm have you talked to any Microsofties? They tow the party line and rave about every new release of the Turd OS as if it were a cure for cancer or something. MS most certainly does have mindless followers, and a lot of them. Watch as this post is voted down, as evidence of those who suckle at Ballmer's teat.


Is this really any surprise?
By 91TTZ on 7/31/2013 2:22:12 PM , Rating: 1
This shouldn't be a surprise at all. Surface was a bad idea from the beginning. It's trying to compete with the iPad but it's overpriced and underperforming. It also uses the same interface that's failing pretty hard on Windows 8.

Long story short the product isn't what customers are looking for. Right from the beginning I was clear that I thought the product would fail and now the product is failing. Microsoft's customers never got on board this ship and their partners are jumping ship.




RE: Is this really any surprise?
By kleinma on 7/31/2013 2:55:54 PM , Rating: 2
Surface or Surface Pro? You probably never used either, but I have a surface pro and it is an all around awesome device. I have yet to see another Windows 8 device that works as well. It can accept input from keyboard, touchpad, screen, pen, or bluetooth wedge mouse I have. Runs everything (i spend most of my time in the desktop, but there is a handful of useful metro apps as well that I use). The UI of Windows 8 works amazingly well for quick switching and moving between start and desktop.

The metro based IE browser is actually really, really good, runs flash content, and is way faster than any other tablet browser you could compare it to.

Based on the fact that its biggest objectors could only complain about its 5 hour battery life, it was a really well made device. I don't think the device is over priced for what it is.


RE: Is this really any surprise?
By xti on 7/31/2013 3:46:27 PM , Rating: 1
I STILL don't get why they didnt just to the surface pro from the get go and never a RT one.

they had to build a fresh RT app eco-system, develop, get builders, etc...if they focused on pro the whole time, they could have cut out 2 of those needs, build hype, and then maybe introduce a slimmer version.

so what if they didn't have a $500 tablet. they should have had the $600-800 tablet that NO ONE else can match with x86 library, modern tablet appeal, etc.

just seems like a whole wheel reinventing from the getgo with anythign on the RT side.


RE: Is this really any surprise?
By 91TTZ on 7/31/13, Rating: 0
RE: Is this really any surprise?
By althaz on 7/31/2013 8:36:43 PM , Rating: 1
The Surface Pro is a brilliant device - for some people (the weight and battery life make it unsuitable for some uses, though it's not as heavy as I was expecting and while it's probably better than a laptop as a desktop replacement, it's worse for actually working in your lap) - but I don't think it's expensive at all. A tablet is an ancillary device that can't replace your laptop or desktop, but can merely complement it (and something like the new Nexus 7 is great at this). The Surface Pro can act as a tablet where needed for most, as well as being an incredibly portable desktop machine. Most laptops are used as consumption devices (which the Surface Pro replaces) or portable workstations (which the Surface Pro replaces), though those who truly work on the go (eg: people like product reviewers) will not find the Surface even close to as good as their laptop.

Considering that the price of an ultrabook (which I could use as a portable desktop) is the same or more than the price of the Surface Pro, plus I get superior build quality, a more portable form factor AND an incredibly fast and easy to use tablet (not to mention a drawing tablet that costs $1000 by itself)...well, I bought it because I consider it an absolute bargain.

You compare it to the iPad, but there is no comparison, the Surface Pro has superior usability (not hard, iOS is pretty shitty on a tablet) as a tablet and is also a PC.

I completely agree on the RT, it should have been $399 with the touch cover (which is actually amazing, certainly much better than my initial impressions suggested). It also should have had the latest Qualcomm SoC instead of the dated, inadequate and not particularly power effecient Tegra 3. Instead it was underpowered and overpriced. Ironically that's something MS die-hards have accused Apple PCs of for years.


By Labotomizer on 7/31/2013 10:18:02 PM , Rating: 2
You're dead on. I bought the Surface Pro for the same reason. For what I require of a portable laptop it's everything I need. It's also nice when I'm sitting it an airport and want to use it as a tablet. I spend a lot of time in data centers a 10" device that gets good battery life (5 hours is plenty for my usage patterns) is awesome. It replaced my iPad and it replaced me having to carry around an HP Elitebook 8540w. That thing weighed 10 lbs. I had an Ultrabook for a bit but it wasn't any better than the Surface at being a laptop and certainly couldn't be a tablet. Now I leave the 8540w docked running VMs (32GB of memory on a laptop is nice) and connect to it over VPN when I need to use it remotely. And since it's running Windows 8 I have all that power with the benefits of the touch screen interface. Pretty awesome.

So my tablet can run putty, Java for things like EMC storage management and ASDM, Wireshark, hook to a serial interface, run 3Par storage manager, connect to any of my client's VPNs and the list goes on and on. So $1000? An absolute deal if you ask me.

It's not for everyone. If you can accomplish everything on an iPad then your usage patterns clearly don't match mine. But for the people the Surface Pro was designed for there isn't a device that even comes close at this point.

Surface RT... meh, I never had any interest in that. Basically an iPad with Office but less random apps. So a wash, at best.


RE: Is this really any surprise?
By nikon133 on 7/31/2013 7:09:31 PM , Rating: 2
I agree.

I spend reasonable time with iPads and iPad Mini, Android tablets and Win 8 Pro tablets (Atom based), and Win 8 are by far my favourite tablet platform.

Modern works great in touchscreen setup, and there is a benefit of being able to run legacy apps, if one needs to. My wife is working in Uni and she found it really nice being able to do some light reading and reviewing of her student's assignments and other papers on tablet, without worrying re compatibility and formating. And I love being able to easily access my home network shares, pull a book, comics or video file from server as simple as I would from my notebook, without extra weight.

In addition, I still stumble upon web sites that will not render correctly on Android or iPad - problem I haven't experienced on Atom tablets.

Problem with Windows tablets, to my opinion, is that they are, at present, too expensive for what they are. They should have price comparative to Atom based netbooks - this is hardware we are talking about, more or less. But while netbooks were available for less than NZ$400, cheapest Atom tablet in NZ (Asus VivoTab Smart) retails for around NZ$650. Better ones, like ThinkPad Tablet 2, are in vicinity of NZ$1000 - you can get decent i5 laptop for that money. This is just not reasonable.

Second problem is, obviously, being late to the party. Android tablets are only catching up, and how long are they around already? But that, in my book, is reason more for Win tablet OEMs to go in as cheap as possible, rather than trying to milk market segment that almost does not exist yet (as in Windows 8 market segment).


RE: Is this really any surprise?
By mac2j on 8/1/2013 12:58:41 AM , Rating: 2
I want to also add I've been exceptionally happy with the Surface Pro. MANY of us in the health care field are using them. Why? It weighs 2 pounds, the battery lasts 5 hours - and it can actually run all of our scientific and clinical software (and office) - none of which could I do on an Ipad. I rarely even bring my laptop with me when I travel any more.

If MS had never done RT and could have pushed out a Pro for $699 this could have been a much bigger win for them.


RE: Is this really any surprise?
By w8gaming on 8/1/2013 9:24:51 AM , Rating: 2
I would have seriously considered buying a Surface Pro if Intel has not released Haswell. Now I wonder why Microsoft is so slow to react. If Samsung is making Surface Pro, you bet they will have a new model call Surface Pro Plus out which uses all the same components but with Haswell chip by now. By all indication this will help a lot in the battery life department.


RT was a horrendous mistake
By quiksilvr on 7/31/2013 1:30:28 PM , Rating: 2
I understand the thought process behind it, but it doesn't excuse the fact that it really doesn't work on paper.

People want to use DESKTOP APPLICATIONS on their tablet SEAMLESSLY. They don't want to wait for another app ecosystem to launch from scratch. IMO, Metro should have been an application launcher install for Windows 7 a year beforehand, giving a lot of time for people to play with it, try it out, weigh in their opinions and find a nice way to INTEGRATE it with current desktop applications or at least make them equal in functionality.

Look at Skype for Desktop and Skype Metro. Can't share screen, no clear definitive way to tweak settings, chat or resize the video without forcing to bring another app to take in a 1/3 of the screen. It's all just a terrible mess of an idea.

I am glad that Windows 8.1 is fixing a lot of these issues and giving people the CHOICE to just avoid the Metro interface entirely. I'm just surprised its taking a year to do so.




RE: RT was a horrendous mistake
By domboy on 7/31/2013 3:43:10 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
People want to use DESKTOP APPLICATIONS on their tablet SEAMLESSLY.


And that right there is why I wonder if Microsoft would have been better trying to evolve the desktop to be more tablet friendly, instead of building a totally new ui. Kind of like how Office 2013/RT has a touch mode, have a touch mode for desktop that can be enabled or disabled depending on the current input method desired.

I like the idea of a convertible device. I think the Surface RT hardware is brilliant. The restrictions on the RT OS need to be re-thought in my opinion. I wouldn't have bought my RT if it were for the jailbreak developed by the fine folks at XDA Developers. Touch is nice for somethings, but I want to use desktop apps when in laptop mode.


RE: RT was a horrendous mistake
By w8gaming on 8/1/2013 9:34:03 AM , Rating: 2
For this idea I have been suggesting that since the biggest problem to use traditional desktop applications in a touch environment is that the finger is simply to fat and click on anything precisely, the UI should provide a virtual touchpad on screen that allows the user to move the mouse pointer just like using a physical touchpad, and virtual buttons to click on for mouse click. Why is it so hard to make a usable interface using touch screen for legacy mode?


RE: RT was a horrendous mistake
By kmmatney on 7/31/2013 3:49:09 PM , Rating: 2
The trouble I have (or had, as I've stopped using them) with Metro Apps is that they were generally worse than using the real App, or using the internet explorer. maybe it's not so bad on a phone-sized screen, but trying to use Metro Apps on a 17" laptop (docked to a 24" Monitor) was beyond cumbersome. It's the ultimate in fragmentation - Apps being used on screen sizes from 4" up to huge LCD monitors. It probably works OK on the surface, but I already have my iPad and laptop, so no need to get a surface.


perfect except...
By jeepga on 7/31/2013 3:56:57 PM , Rating: 2
The Surface would be perfect for me if it wasn't for the battery. I cannot reconcile the crappy battery life and the fact it's not serviceable. They fix that I'll buy one.

I plan on buying an RT if they're still around when my daughter is a little older.




RE: perfect except...
By kleinma on 7/31/2013 6:33:47 PM , Rating: 2
No matter what you buy, sadly you are going to need to get over the serviceable part of it. That is just the way the industry is going. About half the smartphones on the market don't have user replaceable batteries, and virtually all tablets. Now its all glue, solder, and adhesive keeping these things together. Planned obsolescence.


RE: perfect except...
By spread on 7/31/2013 11:40:11 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Now its all glue, solder, and adhesive keeping these things together. Planned obsolescence.


No it isn't. It's not planned obsolescence. They are glued together because glue takes less space so the device is thinner. Glue is cheaper and the design can be simpler further saving costs and making devices cheaper, lighter and more space can be used for battery instead of screws and places to thread the screw.

You can't buy cheap stuff and then scream planned obsolescence! You got EXACTLY what you wanted.


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