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Print 14 comment(s) - last by drycrust3.. on Dec 22 at 1:53 PM

Microsoft will now focus on social media and its own conferences like BUILD

The International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is an unrivalled electronics industry event, held each January.  The CES generates a massive amount of revenue for the Las Vegas tourism business and the promoters (profits by the Consumer Electronics Association are reinvested in legal advocacy, standards work, and educational events [source]).  At the same time it gives the public (via the media) unparalleled recaps of recently launched products and previews of future products.

But increasingly the CES is also falling out of favor.  The trend could possibly be traced back to when Apple, Inc. (AAPL) in the wake of its MacWorld cancellation (which also ran in January) decided to do smaller one-off events assisted by social media, rather than buying into the CEA's scheme.

Now the CES has lost one of its biggest supporters, Microsoft Corp. (MSFT).  Microsoft typically has been a CES all-star, demoing its latest innovations like tablets [1][2] and, back in 2009, the Windows 7 beta.  Traditionally the CES has featured a keynote by their ever entertaining and hyperactive chief executive Steve Ballmer.

Steve Ballmer, CES
Steve Ballmer gives the audience a little slice of his reality at CES 2011.
© Jason Mick/DailyTech 2011.

But to quote the Winnebago Man, "No more!"

Microsoft post its official blog that 2011 will be Microsoft final year to give a keynote or have a booth at CES.  It writes that it will attend future CES only in a limited capacity, writing:

We'll continue to participate in CES as a great place to connect with partners and customers across the PC, phone and entertainment industries, but we won’t have a keynote or booth after this year because our product news milestones generally don’t align with the show’s January timing.

Microsoft, like Apple has turned to funneling much of its communications through one-off events and social media outlets like Twitter and Facebook.  It also has put increasing emphasis on its new September BUILD conference, which it previewed its upcoming Windows 8 operating system at a few months ago.

We will be covering Microsoft's final CES keynote.


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Not Surprised
By Arsynic on 12/22/2011 10:12:53 AM , Rating: 3
Most companies like Apple prefer to manage their PR carefully through smaller, more staged events. Plus at CES, your stuff tends to get lost in the sea of half-baked electronics. I don't blame MS for wanting out.

So many "journalists" won't have qualms about slamming stuff that they know isn't even close to release.




RE: Not Surprised
By Donkey2008 on 12/22/2011 11:25:30 AM , Rating: 2
"So many "journalists" won't have qualms about slamming stuff that they know isn't even close to release."

That is about as true a statement as I have ever read on these forums. Like Jerry Maguire once said - we live in a cynical, CYNICAL world. Bad opinions (NOT objective reviews) spread so fast on forums and social media that even a decent product (*cough* iPhone 4) will be slammed immediately for no other reason than someone has a need to cry, bro.

I do not blame MS a bit.


RE: Not Surprised
By drycrust3 on 12/22/2011 1:39:37 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Most companies like Apple prefer to manage their PR carefully


Since Apple didn't plunge into bankruptcy as soon as Jobs died, then that is proof that a company (or a large multinational corporation) can continue operating successfully without one, so now people can see that it isn't essential to business for MS to show "we have a charismatic leader too".
Also, considering MS is primarily a software company, and one which relies on exclusive operating system contract bound manufacturers to distribute their products, then it is arguable that shows like the CES are unnecessary and counter-productive, especially if some unplanned event happens e.g. the OS crashes.


RE: Not Surprised
By drycrust3 on 12/22/2011 1:53:42 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
can continue operating successfully without one

Duh! What a dummy! I meant to write "without a charismatic leader".


keynote, no. but keep the booth
By RamarC on 12/21/11, Rating: 0
RE: keynote, no. but keep the booth
By Roy2001 on 12/21/2011 5:21:18 PM , Rating: 2
Do you also mean Apple is dumb?


By sprockkets on 12/21/2011 6:01:36 PM , Rating: 2
Apple is apple, they don't go to any trade show because that would ruin their "exclusiveness". It would also make them look bad when the rest of the market shows open solutions like DLNA while they sit in their corner trying to lock you into their ecosystem.


By Subzero0000 on 12/21/2011 9:04:13 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Do you also mean Apple is dumb?


Apple way of doing things wouldn't work for Microsoft. So yes, MS is dumb.

People want to see more about Microsoft. Not like Apple hiding in their secret lab and don't communicate.


.
By sprockkets on 12/21/2011 5:54:11 PM , Rating: 2
Somehow, somewhere, this must be apple's fault.




RE: .
By Subzero0000 on 12/21/2011 9:07:06 PM , Rating: 2
Well, you can't read Jason's article without an Apple.

An apple a day keeps the doctor away~


errs
By Bonesdad on 12/21/2011 10:56:44 PM , Rating: 2
Paragraph II...falling out of favor...

and...

...Ballmer, Microsoft's hyperactive and coke-addled CEO.




wrong year in the article?
By OzQuant on 12/21/2011 11:17:29 PM , Rating: 2
"Microsoft post its official blog that 2011 will be Microsoft final year..."

Don't you mean 2012? Or was MSFT's appearance earlier this the last one, so they won't be appearing in 3 week's time?




Makes perfect sense to me...
By SunAngel on 12/22/2011 12:55:55 PM , Rating: 2
...it seems China and the rest of the Asian BLOC (except Japan) are hell bent on bootlegging any and all intellectual property they can. Poor Apple has been getting robbed and mugged almost unfettered. Fortunately and unforturnately, Microsoft is closing most access routes expect reverse engineering. Obviously, the BLOC can't be stopped, but slowing their 'to market speed' seems to be the only solution at the moment to combat their blatant IP thievery. May God bless any company's soul that has been clipped of their IP portfolio.




By GatoRat on 12/22/2011 12:59:31 PM , Rating: 2
Generic trade shows typically favor small companies. This is still very important in vertical markets where deals are often done. However, for consumer products, the shows have become increasingly irrelevant. Most these shows are just excuses for sales people to visit Vegas (or elsewhere) on the company dime.

If you are trying to peddle a product to the consumer space, there are far better trade shows to go to that will put you in contact with buyers. Even then you are probably better off making sales calls to the store changes and channel buyers.




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