backtop


Print 13 comment(s) - last by Joz.. on Feb 28 at 1:50 AM


Apple MacBook Air

Lenovo ThinkPad X300
Toshiba's new 1.8" HDDs boast a 5400 RPM spindle speed

When it comes to mobile storage, 1.8" HDDs are both loved and cursed by consumers. The small drives allow for a relatively large amount of storage in a small form factor, however, the drives spin at a lethargic 4200 RPM.

The rather slow spindle speed isn't much of a problem with portable media players (PMPs) such as the iPod Classic or Zune 80 -- the problem comes when the drives are installed in ultra-portable notebooks like the Apple MacBook Air which uses an 80GB 1.8" HDD spinning at 4200 RPM.

Apple tries to get around the performance issues by offering a 1.8" 64GB PATA solid state disk (SSD) for increased performance, but that drive option also adds $999 to the price of the already expensive notebook.

Lenovo dispensed with HDDs altogether on its new ThinkPad X300 and only offers a 1.8" 64GB SATA SSD.

Toshiba looks to give mobile devices everywhere a boost with its new 1.8" MK1216GSG (120GB) and MK8016GSG (80GB) HDDs. Both new drives meet the new SATA 2.6 specification and incorporate a micro-SATA connector. Most importantly, the new drives spin at 5400 RPM -- a speed that was once reserved for larger 2.5" HDDs in the mobile sector.

Both drives feature 8MB of cache and offer data transfer rates of 489 Mbits/sec. Toshiba lists average seek time at 15ms for both drives.

"The portable computing market is looking for an uncompromised computing experience in small and light-weight storage solutions," said Toshiba Storage VP of Marketing Maciek Brzeski. "With enhanced features for the mobile environment, these new 1.8-inch HDDs enable mobile system manufacturers to reap the benefits of high-capacity magnetic storage, along with better power efficiency and ruggedness."

The most likely target for the faster drives from Toshiba is Apple's MacBook Air. The availability of faster, higher-capacity drives could blunt some of the performance advantages of the expensive SSD option on the MacBook Air.

Likewise, Lenovo may be wise to offer the drives on its ThinkPad X300. Reviews for the 13.3" notebook have been overwhelmingly positive, but the high $2,500 price of entry is a big turn-off to some. Toshiba's drives could easily drop the ThinkPad X300's price entry well below the $2,000 mark.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

About friggin' time
By amanojaku on 2/27/2008 1:24:43 PM , Rating: 3
I can't wait for affordable SSDs, but this is a nice temporary measure.




RE: About friggin' time
By DASQ on 2/27/2008 1:40:52 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed. Need SSD prices to fall faster so I can replace my aging Raptor OS drive.


RE: About friggin' time
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 2/27/2008 2:27:09 PM , Rating: 2
Very much so. I love the idea of SSDs, but I just can't stomach the price premium.


RE: About friggin' time
By eye smite on 2/27/2008 2:59:48 PM , Rating: 4
I imagine in 6 to 12 months as supply begins to overcome the demand the prices will signifacantly drop. They're actually making advancements faster than anyone can afford these days. heh


RE: About friggin' time
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 2/27/2008 3:02:53 PM , Rating: 2
Even with a 33% to 45% drop year to year, it's still going to be a while before I purchase one.

http://blogs.cnet.com/8301-13924_1-9876557-64.html


RE: About friggin' time
By daftrok on 2/27/2008 7:04:10 PM , Rating: 2
What about power consumption? How much more power does a 1.8" 5400 RPM drive take when compared to a 1.8" 4200 RM drive?


About the MacBook Air SSD
By andreschmidt on 2/27/2008 2:19:23 PM , Rating: 2
Pardon me but unless I am going blind the 64GB Solid State Drive is a $999 upgrade and not $1,300 as the news article seems to imply.

quote:
Apple tries to get around the performance issues by offering a 1.8" 64GB PATA solid state disk (SSD) for increased performance, but that drive option also adds $1,300 to the price of the already expensive notebook.




By Brandon Hill (blog) on 2/27/2008 2:24:18 PM , Rating: 2
You are correct, the article has been updated.


RE: About the MacBook Air SSD
By andreschmidt on 2/27/2008 2:24:23 PM , Rating: 2
I am sure you mean the MacBook Air and not the MacBook Pro, considering the MacBook Pro already comes with a 200GB 2.5" 5400RPM drive.

quote:
The most likely target for the faster drives from Toshiba is Apple's MacBook Pro. The availability of faster, higher-capacity drives could blunt some of the performance advantages of the expensive SSD option on the MacBook Air.


RE: About the MacBook Air SSD
By PlasmaBomb on 2/27/2008 2:43:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
64GB Solid State Drive is a $999 upgrade


That is what I see on the site too :)


or another alternative
By Mojo the Monkey on 2/27/2008 2:13:36 PM , Rating: 2
how far away is consumer-level "nanochip" storage?




By ViperV990 on 2/27/2008 2:41:34 PM , Rating: 2
I'm surprised that this 5400rpm drive isn't in the Air already. I mean, considering the relationship between Apple and Toshiba, that the iPod single-handedly popularized the 1.8" form factor. I'll admit that I don't know for sure what drive comes with the iPod classic, except that I've seen a 80 gig 5mm Toshiba drive. But I digress.

Point is, if Apple can work with Intel on the small CPU package, why did they not do the same with the Toshiba on the HDD?




X300
By Joz on 2/28/2008 1:50:37 AM , Rating: 2
If I can(could?) afford a X300 with a SSD, then damn it, im gona get an SSD!

Its only a few hundred difference, the accounting depart will never know the difference.

=P




"We shipped it on Saturday. Then on Sunday, we rested." -- Steve Jobs on the iPad launch

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki