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WirelessHD 1.0 specification moves us one step closer to wire-free home theaters

High definition programming is a great thing for gamers and TV watchers as it allows for much better image quality and better sound. The problem, however, that is always associated with home theater is the mass of wires and cables that go along with most setups.

The WirelessHD 1.0 specification was ratified today. WirelessHD is comprised of a group of companies including Intel, LG Electronics, Matsushita, NEC, Samsung Electronics, SiBEAM, Sony Corp., and Toshiba Corp.

DailyTech first reported on WirelessHD in October of 2006 when it was first announced. This new WirelessHD 1.0 standard takes advantage of unlicensed 60 GHz frequencies to transmit high definition signals from game consoles, cable boxes, DVR, camcorders and other devices to a HDTV for display.

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) said it will work with the WirelessHD group to ensure protected high definition broadcasts are secured during transmission. Jim Williams, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for the Motion MPAA said in a statement, “The major motion picture studios are actively engaged in the development of innovative new solutions that give consumers greater flexibility and more choices for how and where they access and enjoy movies and television shows.”

The completion of the WirelessHD 1.0 specification will allow manufacturers to focus on the product design portion of product development without fear that products won’t be interoperable so long as the manufacturer follows the WirelessHD 1.0 framework. WirelessHD also has begun the next phase of creating a logo for consumers to easily tell when products using the specification are interoperable along with compliance and test programs.



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How long until
By BMFPitt on 1/3/2008 3:07:41 PM , Rating: 6
Make sure to put a MONSTER Air Purifier between your TV and your receiver for the highest quality of air. Featuring gold-plated ions and the highest grade of oxygen!




RE: How long until
By mdogs444 on 1/3/2008 3:10:10 PM , Rating: 1
maybe Monster will soon buy out Oreck? Ultra High Quality Home Theater Air Purifiers.


RE: How long until
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 1/3/2008 3:21:20 PM , Rating: 2
My whole right side now hurts from laughing. I just got a Wii and have been playing tennis and bowling with my right hand/arm.

I just read your post and the laughter is causing my whole right side to ache in pain due to the fact that I'm horribly out of shape.

DAMN YOU!!! :) And DAMN MONSTER!!


RE: How long until
By theapparition on 1/3/2008 4:00:49 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
I just got a Wii and have been playing tennis and bowling with my right hand/arm.

Come clean......is that the real reason your right arm/hand hurts???


RE: How long until
By FITCamaro on 1/3/2008 3:26:56 PM , Rating: 3
Classic.


RE: How long until
By ChiefNuts on 1/3/2008 3:37:36 PM , Rating: 2
Oh, that has to be the funniest thing i've heard a day.


RE: How long until
By BMFPitt on 1/3/2008 4:30:42 PM , Rating: 5
Cool, my first 6!


RE: How long until
By phattyboombatty on 1/3/2008 5:30:31 PM , Rating: 2
And well deserved. Best 6 I've seen so far.


RE: How long until
By Oregonian2 on 1/3/2008 5:36:00 PM , Rating: 2
I wish I could have upped your count, but you're maxed out at 6!

LOL!!


Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By phatboye on 1/3/2008 3:09:21 PM , Rating: 4
WTF is this WirelessHD, this is the first i've ever heard of it. Please tell me this is the same as Wireless HDMI, my heart can't take another format war.




RE: Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By mdogs444 on 1/3/2008 3:11:48 PM , Rating: 1
Essentially yes - but its not wireless HDMI becuase there is no HDMI cable lol.

Its a wireless signal between components that carries high definition audio & video.


RE: Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By phatboye on 1/3/2008 3:41:40 PM , Rating: 2
so are the two formats compatible?


RE: Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By mdogs444 on 1/3/2008 3:48:58 PM , Rating: 3
What?

Its wireless signal....HDMI is a wired signal. There is no need for compatibility.

Or I dont understand your question...


RE: Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By phatboye on 1/3/2008 4:52:58 PM , Rating: 2
I said Wireless HDMI not HDMI. The question is is WirelessHD compatible with Wireless HDMI.


RE: Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By kyp275 on 1/3/2008 5:06:45 PM , Rating: 2
Since there's no such thing as "Wireless HDMI", you don't really need to worry about compatibility.

HDMI refers to a wired format, a wireless hdmi would be a wireless...wire?

You might as well ask for a wheel-less bycicle.


By kyp275 on 1/3/2008 5:08:04 PM , Rating: 2
and yes, I spelled bicycle wrong, don't ask me why :P


RE: Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By phatboye on 1/3/2008 5:31:58 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Since there's no such thing as "Wireless HDMI", you don't really need to worry about compatibility.

Maybe you should google Wireless HDMI. It is a format that, although hasn't been completed yet, it does exist. And from the looks of it, it will not be compatible with WirelessHD.

So prepare yourselves for another format war.


RE: Another F**KING FORMAT WAR?!?!?!?
By omnicronx on 1/4/2008 10:38:09 AM , Rating: 2
From the sounds of it, it really wont be a format war as they do different things;

Wireless HDMI spec currently says its going to be a compressed format that will offer 'perfect replication'

WirelessHD is going to take advantage of the 60GHZ band which allows the data to be sent uncompressed.

Not only that but in the beginning from what I understand, these will be addon products to existing technology. I.e will probably take use of transmitters and receivers.

So really they do not even need to be compatible, they are separate products that should work with everything. I see no need to mix and match transmitter and receiver components.


By omnicronx on 1/4/2008 10:39:41 AM , Rating: 2
Here is a good link outlining the two formats.

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070725-the-...


By JonnyBlaze on 1/3/2008 5:09:43 PM , Rating: 2
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070725-the-...

doesnt look like they will be compatible.


I was excited until I saw MPAA
By PAPutzback on 1/3/2008 3:03:21 PM , Rating: 4
So this will be sitting around for how many years before the MPAA is happy with the encryption solution only to get hacked days after release anyways.

I hope to see this in the future soon. How nice would it be to swap the ceiling fan for a projector and not have to worry about any wires other than power.

I hope my wife doesn't read dailytech.




RE: I was excited until I saw MPAA
By Polynikes on 1/3/2008 3:15:39 PM , Rating: 2
Hahaha, then you'd be in some trouble. Seriously, though, the only reason I don't have surround sound is because of the setup of the room, and using wired speakers would be messy. If we can get some wireless stuff things will be so much cleaner.


By FITCamaro on 1/3/2008 3:23:27 PM , Rating: 2
This is for device -> TV.

And there already are wireless speakers out there. But nothing will ever beat the quality and stability of a wire.

Personally I'd just run them through the walls/ceiling.


RE: I was excited until I saw MPAA
By abhaxus on 1/3/2008 3:25:42 PM , Rating: 2
This has nothing to do with wireless speakers, only display devices.

Wireless speakers will not be a compelling reality until wireless power is possible. Even now the highest quality wireless transmission for audio is terrible quality not to mention the speakers have to be powered in some way.

If you want a decent surround setup without true surround speakers I suggest you look at a Yamaha sound projector if your room is enclosed on all 4 walls and fairly rectangular or square, or a Polk surroundbar if your room is neither of those.


RE: I was excited until I saw MPAA
By solidcode on 1/3/2008 4:08:27 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly! Why do bother about wireless when you still have to have wires to provide power to DVD player, TV set and even speakers. And why do not use those wires which are used to power all these stuff up to transfer data. This technology does exist and called HomePlug AV. And it is successfully used to transfer both video and surround sound.


By SlyNine on 1/4/2008 8:39:46 AM , Rating: 2
The would be a nice idea to have another plugin on the power strip that would pass data between devices. But I think cables like HDMI that put sound and video in the same are already reaching that point.

However the point of this is to have your DVR, MP3, and whatever other media devices you have connect to other TV's threw out the house, Like watching TV in bed for instance. All you need is the TV and maybe a stereo.


By icemansims on 1/4/2008 1:23:16 PM , Rating: 2
And microwave your popcorn right at your couch while watching TV, Yay!


No Proprietary Format
By mdogs444 on 1/3/2008 3:05:53 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The WirelessHD 1.0 specification was ratified today. WirelessHD is comprised of a group of companies including Intel, LG Electronics, Matsushita, NEC, Samsung Electronics, SiBEAM, Sony Corp., and Toshiba Corp.


Not to be a Sony hater, because I actually like the quality of some of their products (Bravia Tv's, their high end Home Theater receivers), but does anyone else find it amusing that Sony did not attempt to go out on a limb to create their own proprietary wireless high definition format? Perhaps something along the lines of "WirelessBD"?

Just seems to me that alot of things they do have to be Sony proprietary first - it fails - then they move on to join the masses...

BetaMax to VHS, MiniDisc, aTrac, etc




RE: No Proprietary Format
By DigitalFreak on 1/3/2008 3:09:09 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe Sir Howard has started to reign them in a bit.


RE: No Proprietary Format
By PAPutzback on 1/3/2008 3:15:03 PM , Rating: 2
Give them time. They'll muck it up and wait till you have atleast one part of the Sony puzzle and have to go buy another Sony piece because it is incompatible with your other high end gear.


RE: No Proprietary Format
By killerroach on 1/3/2008 3:22:30 PM , Rating: 3
That being said, Sony was also a leading company in the development of the compact disc, and Blu-Ray is far from being a proprietary format, having a fairly wide array of support...

Granted, they still have their tendencies to go off on their own (Memory Stick and UMD come to mind as recent attempts), but at least Memory Stick is pretty flexible across a spectrum of products (UMD, on the other hand, just seems to be an odd stepchild of MD that was dead on arrival). But for almost every instance of Sony doing something indescribably alienating to the rest of the technology industry, they seem to put together something that comes to market with numerous companies lining up behind it. I guess it's kinda like the Janus approach to development.


RE: No Proprietary Format
By Oregonian2 on 1/3/2008 5:45:18 PM , Rating: 2
The CD was proprietary, it was developed by Sony and Phillips. It was then licensed to others -- not the same as being non-proprietary. Just was being licensed by others. There are several makers of memory sticks, and Sony probably would not mind others licensing it from them.


RE: No Proprietary Format
By BVT on 1/4/2008 2:11:21 PM , Rating: 2
Being proprietary and having support are two entirely different things. BluRay is proprietary as Sony owns most of the major patents. Nearly everything new that Sony releases is proprietary. They try to corner a market and license the users to death because it is easy money.

Name one thing, other than cds, that Sony has introduced that companies have lined up behind. you cant say BluRay either, because it has not won the format war.

BluRay will be the death of Sony.


RE: No Proprietary Format
By pomaikai on 1/3/2008 3:48:04 PM , Rating: 1
Dont forget Sony developing SXRD to compete with DLP. Atleast they already gave up on there SXRD technology.


The frequency sounds like a bad idea
By dgingeri on 1/3/2008 3:10:44 PM , Rating: 2
They note that they are going to use the "unlicensed 60Ghz frequency", but that is probably a bad idea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extremely_high_freque...

note at the top of this Wikipedia article, it notes that "signals in the 57-64 GHz region are subject to a resonance of the oxygen molecule and are severely attenuated". I think this would cause significant issues.




RE: The frequency sounds like a bad idea
By A5 on 1/3/2008 3:16:21 PM , Rating: 3
From the same article:
quote:
the 60 GHz band can be used for unlicensed short range (1.7 km) data links with data throughputs up to 2.5 Gbit/s (gigabits per second).

Unless your DVD player is 2km from your TV, it's not a problem.


RE: The frequency sounds like a bad idea
By mdogs444 on 1/3/2008 4:10:09 PM , Rating: 2
So can you steal the signal from your neighbors house? Oh the new way to steal cable!


By diego10arg on 1/4/2008 5:25:23 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Oh the new way to steal cable!


You may, somehow. Either way you will not be stealing cable.


By mcnabney on 1/3/2008 11:05:09 PM , Rating: 2
This format has already failed. You read it right here.

2.5Gb/s - the most basic HDMI 1.0 has double the bandwidth, so this is DOA, especially since by the time this gets out HDMI 1.3 will be maxed out with TrueHD and multiple uncompressed audio streams.


By Oregonian2 on 1/3/2008 5:42:03 PM , Rating: 2
Yes, selection for this kind of purpose is intentional (as are uses of frequencies near water resonances like in microwave ovens and other services). Cuts down on interference between users that are close together.


Lies, damn lies, and the MPAA
By ElFenix on 1/3/2008 3:01:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
“The major motion picture studios are actively engaged in the development of innovative new solutions that give consumers greater flexibility and more choices for how and where they access and enjoy movies and television shows.”
As long as they buy our system with a brand new television, brand new HD player, brand new game console, all with the associated licenses and fees paid to all the players. Oh, and by 'flexibility' we mean that we will have the flexibility to shut down your connection at any time for just about any reason. We wouldn't want you picking that lock we just gave you the keys to, after all.




RE: Lies, damn lies, and the MPAA
By FITCamaro on 1/3/2008 3:20:43 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know what you mean by "shut down your connection".

It will undoubtedly, like everything else, be hacked. And they can't really do anything about it other than try to change the encryption key. There's no way for them to know you're picking up the signal as well either since its just broadcast.


By mcnabney on 1/3/2008 11:08:36 PM , Rating: 2
Most of the new protected digital content can be remotely deactivated or deleted by the Copyright owner. That's right, they can purge it right off your hard drive. For example, Fox may decide that the episode of the Simpsons you recorded will need to be deleted after 72 hours. The hardware already supports it, the studios or networks just need to flip the switch.


Was it REALLY necessary...
By Creig on 1/3/2008 3:34:25 PM , Rating: 2
to include the following sentence in the article?

quote:
The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) said it will work with the WirelessHD group to ensure protected high definition broadcasts are secured during transmission.


I believe this statement falls under the heading of "redundant".




RE: Was it REALLY necessary...
By hbirdy on 1/3/2008 4:50:58 PM , Rating: 3
It would be much better if we could send the original MPEG2, MPEG4 AVC, H.264, VC-1 compressed content from the source - STB, HD-DVD, BD, PS3, XBOX - to the television but MPAA doesn't want compressed content traveling outside the source device. We wouldn't need 60GHz except for MPAA's demand that only high-bandwidth uncompressed content get sent.


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