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New sockets, chipsets and architecture en route from Intel before 2009

Nehalem will likely be the most aggressive processor architecture in Intel's portfolio since the original Pentium. With the launch of the Core architecture, the company announced its tick-tock strategy: design new architecture, then shrink the process node.  Rinse and repeat.

Tick-tock is alive and well as Intel's corporate roadmap reveals additional details about its desktop iteration of 45nm quad-core Nehalem, dubbed Bloomfield.

Nehalem will be fundamentally different from the Core architecture for no less than two reasons. The company will move the memory controller from the core logic on the motherboard to the processor die.  This tactic has been a cornerstone for the AMD K8 architecture since 2003.

In addition, Nehalem will also feature a new bus interconnect, currently dubbed Quick Path Interconnect.  This new interconnect behaves very similar to HyperTransport, currently used on all AMD platforms since K8.

A new bus and memory controller means a new socket design. Existing motherboards are not compatible with Nehalem-based processors.  The new desktop socket, labeled LGA1366, will completely replace the existing LGA775 interconnect. 

The company will replace the X38 and yet to be announced X48 desktop chipsets with the Tylersburg chipset family and ICH10 southbridge for these first LGA1366 motherboards. 

Corporate guidance also suggests the company will likely ditch all DDR2 support in favor of DDR3, at least on the high end platforms.  All Bloomfield processors will feature support three DDR3 channels.

However, not everything is known about Nehalem just yet.  Corporate guidance suggests Bloomfield will feature a new revision of Hyper-Threading.  Although each Bloomfield features four physical cores, the processor will dynamically allocate additional threads -- Bloomfield computers will detect eight logical cores.

Bloomfield will feature less cache than Intel's high-end 45nm Penryn offerings slated for release between now and Q4 2008.  However, unlike the 12MB L2 cache featured on Penryn, the 8MB L3 cache on all Nehalem offerings can be shared between all four on-die cores.

Intel's highest-end Bloomfield processors will feature a 130W thermal envelope.  Extreme Edition Penryn processors, the first on the 45nm node, have a thermal envelope that tops out around 136W.  Intel's Q9550 processor (2.8 GHz, 45nm quad-core) sports a 95W TDP.

Paul Otellini, Intel CEO, boldly announced that Nehalem as "taped out" at the Intel Developer Forum last September.  The tape out designates when a design team has moved from the design to working samples. 

At both Intel and AMD, the tape out comes approximately one year before the actual launch date.  True to tick-tock, Bloomfield's debut will also come one year after the 45nm node launch, or Penryn.


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How is Nehalem pronounced
By phatboye on 10/26/2007 11:57:56 AM , Rating: 2
What language is the name Nehalem derived from because from the way it's spelled it looks pretty akward to pronounce.




RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By phatboye on 10/26/2007 11:58:28 AM , Rating: 2
doh double post sorry =/


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 10/26/2007 12:01:17 PM , Rating: 2
Na-hale-em


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By B on 10/26/2007 5:41:10 PM , Rating: 5
Say it with me, "car·ne asa·da".


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Houdani on 10/26/2007 12:08:04 PM , Rating: 5
Native American: Nehalem (aka Tillamook) tribe.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By plewis00 on 10/26/2007 8:24:30 PM , Rating: 2
Wasn't Tillamook the codename for the Intel Mobile Pentium MMX processor (200-300Mhz speeds)?


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By geddarkstorm on 10/26/2007 12:08:56 PM , Rating: 2
Sounds like Hebrew or some other semitic language. It's a cool name IMO.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By jiteo on 10/26/07, Rating: -1
RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Griswold on 10/26/2007 4:10:27 PM , Rating: 3
Its neither hebrew nor is nehalem a project of the israel design team.

Nehalem is a native american word and the chip a product of the oregon team.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By PlasmaBomb on 10/27/2007 6:34:13 AM , Rating: 3
RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Hoser McMoose on 10/28/2007 11:54:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just to clarify it is named after a town ->

Going on Intel's standard naming convention it's probably actually named after the Nehalem River rather than the town itself, but yeah, definitely Oregon and not Israel. Most (all?) of Intel's recent codenames have been names of rivers in Oregon.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Metroid on 10/26/2007 1:00:24 PM , Rating: 2
The way Nehalem is pronounced vary, as far as I know in United Kingdom we say Na-hale-em as Kristopher already said on his previous post and in United States of America we say Ni-*hei-lan.

I hope it helps,

Metroid.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By retrospooty on 10/26/2007 1:11:04 PM , Rating: 3
I dont think so. In America we say na-hay-lem. It is a city and a river in Oregon, and I remember it on an Everclear song, before the dood got too lost in his disease LOL.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nehalem,_Oregon


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Metroid on 10/26/2007 1:25:13 PM , Rating: 1
I'm sorry but same names may mean different pronunciation, I just said what I heard from the Nehalem creator said on Intel developer forum last month. He created so he can call it whatever he wants.

http://www.intel.com/pressroom/kits/events/idfspr_...

I hope it helps,

Metroid.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By retrospooty on 10/26/2007 1:50:47 PM , Rating: 3
well, it all depends on who you believe... A well known alcoholic/heroin addict, or the highly educated engineer at Intel? ;)


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 10/26/2007 1:56:37 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
A well known alcoholic/heroin addict

Hey what have you heard?!?! :)


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Black69ta on 10/26/2007 3:30:09 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe they are one and the same? After all it was Israel R&D who came up with Core 2 right maybe that is how they thought "Outside the Box" Lol


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Metroid on 10/26/2007 2:05:42 PM , Rating: 2
lol. I believe on you of course talking about the river or the city being that way pronounced as for the Intel new codename Nehalen I take the engineer words.

Have a nice day :)

Metroid.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By snarfbot on 10/26/2007 5:33:18 PM , Rating: 2
it doesnt matter how the engineer pronounces it, say the chips codename was garden and he pronounced it gayer-deen, that would be dumb.

its the same principle.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By melgross on 10/26/2007 7:53:48 PM , Rating: 2
Not if that's they way they wanted it pronounced. How about ViiV? How does one pronounce that? I know it's not a real word, but the way it's normally pronounced, and the way Intel WANTS it to be pronounced are very different.

It's pronounced "veev" if we go by the commonly understood, and used rules. But they want it pronounced as "vive".


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Webreviews on 10/26/07, Rating: 0
RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Griswold on 10/26/2007 4:13:38 PM , Rating: 2
No and no. The architecture after nehalem will, once again, come from intel israel. This time its oregons turn.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By sheh on 10/26/2007 6:12:10 PM , Rating: 2
"Procedures" would be a pretty lousy codename for a CPU, no? :)

BTW, the Hebrew signular of "nehaleem" is "nohal".


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Gentleman on 10/26/2007 7:10:46 PM , Rating: 3
What nationality was the Intel Engineer? I like to know that before taking "his" pronounciation for a word like Nahalem


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Yaron on 10/27/2007 4:00:33 AM , Rating: 1
Nehalem is not in Native American it IS IN HEBREW - as all architectures that comes from Intel Israel (Pentium M and up to C2D).

1. Nehalem (pronounced Ne-Ha-Lim) means streams or brooks.

3. Merom (Core 2 Duo T-series) - Means a high place (usually referred to the sky).

2. Yonah (Core Duo) - Means Pigeon in Hebrew. Yonah is also the source of the christian name 'Jonah'.

4. Dothan (Pentium M) - is a valley in Israel and is also used as a family name (but without the 'h' - Dotan).

5. Banias (Pentium M) - is a famous river in northern Israel.

And it all began with a processor called 'Timnah' (Timnah is a biblical place in southern Israel), that was scrapped by intel and then returned in his next life to help save intel - you know it as the Pentium M (Centrino Platform).

All of these processors have names in plain Hebrew and all were designed in Israel.

And if you were wondering... I am an Israeli too! ;)

- Yaron.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By crystal clear on 10/27/2007 5:17:35 AM , Rating: 1
Yes you are right on this.(the translations)

Yes Intel Israel-the R&D machine of Intel.

Just like Intel manufacturing huge & fast.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By crystal clear on 10/27/2007 5:58:42 AM , Rating: 2
People dont seem to realize that these code names-the hebrew ones have some meaning behind them that have some relation to the product itself.

Example-Nehalem
correctly defined/clarfied by yaron.

Nehalem (pronounced Ne-Ha-Lim) means streams or brooks.


Streams here could be related to cores.

If you refer to this link-

"Nehalem" Taped-out and Running Windows

http://www.dailytech.com/Nehalem+Tapedout+and+Runn...

All that changed, to some extent on a whim, with the Israeli-developed mobile processors. The mobile Core architecture would eventually replace Intel's entire NetBurst family,

Nehalem chief architect, Glen Hinton, tells DailyTech the philosophy behind 731 million transistor, 45nm Nehalem is an extension of the approach to Penryn and 65nm Core 2 Duo processors: a universal, robust core design that will scale from mobile to server applications.

" We wanted to build the highest performance per core that could be used in notebooks all the way to high end servers," stated Hinton.

The Gigahertz War has officially shifted to the Multi-core War.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Lakku on 10/27/2007 5:31:14 AM , Rating: 2
Why would you post this after everyone else already explained where the design team for Nehalem is located and where the word came from? It IS a native american word, and Nehalm IS being design in Oregon, NOT Israel. Your translations may be correct, and they look like they are from what I can gather around the internet, but you are completely wrong about where Nehalem is being designed and about where the name comes from in this case.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By crystal clear on 10/27/2007 6:44:46 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
but you are completely wrong about where Nehalem is being designed and about where the name comes from in this case.


Just remember-
"The mobile Core architecture has replaced Intel's entire NetBurst family,"

The Intel Israel however much officially kept in the background "is the place where its all done"-All those in the business with access to such crucial information know it.

Those codenames very Hebrew are product related & indicate the source of development of the product.

The design team can be located in more than one location-technology enables you manage the design process without actually being at one place.

You have to be in the business of Outsourcing to understand what I am talking.

There are plently of Israeli firms who have much of their development work done by others namely India.

They (Israelis)know how to manage the whole project with the help of technologies available to do so,example Vedeo conferencing etc etc

Just remember-

The company's NetBurst architecture didn't scale and its Itanium architecture didn't sell; it looked as if for the first time in history, Moore's Law was in serious jeopardy.

All that changed, to some extent on a whim, with the Israeli-developed mobile processors. The mobile Core architecture would eventually replace Intel's entire NetBurst family,


http://www.dailytech.com/Nehalem+Tapedout+and+Runn...


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By TLCKurovski on 10/27/2007 7:09:24 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just remember-
"The mobile Core architecture has replaced Intel's entire NetBurst family,"
And, according to all roadmaps, will be replaced by Nehalem uarch...
quote:
The Intel Israel however much officially kept in the background "is the place where its all done"-All those in the business with access to such crucial information know it.
Everybody knows that Core, P55 and PM was made by Israeli design teams.

But P6 and P68 were made by Hillsboro... And Nehalem, was, is and will ever be a Hillsboro project.
quote:
The design team can be located in more than one location-technology enables you manage the design process without actually being at one place.
IBM does this. Intel? Don´t think so.
quote:
You have to be in the business of Outsourcing to understand what I am talking.
There are plently of Israeli firms who have much of their development work done by others namely India.
There is only one big Intel team on India, and, AFAIK, it has never finished a microprocessor project.
quote:
The company's NetBurst architecture didn't scale and its Itanium architecture didn't sell; it looked as if for the first time in history, Moore's Law was in serious jeopardy.
That´s all you can come up with? First, Moore´s Law has nothing to do with the frequency scaling of a microprocessor uarch...
quote:
All that changed, to some extent on a whim, with the Israeli-developed mobile processors. The mobile Core architecture would eventually replace Intel's entire NetBurst family
Of course. By the way, Core took two weeks to be developed :)...


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By crystal clear on 10/28/2007 2:22:22 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
IBM does this. Intel? Don´t think so.

also

There is only one big Intel team on India, and, AFAIK, it has never finished a microprocessor project.



I referred to this subject(design teams) in general as I know many Israeli firms(non Intel) who do just that.
They have a close working relationship with Indian companies.

Intel also works on this model-

Teamwork Delivers on the Promise of Cadence
At the heart of delivering the promise of cadence are are multiple concurrent and parallel design teams working in tandem on a global scale. This requires careful coordination between teams to build on the strengths of each while complementing a variety of methodologies and plans, all with minimal overlap and redundancy.



http://www.intel.com/technology/magazine/computing...

The above link could give you some indication about-

IF Nehalem, was, is and will ever be a Hillsboro project.


It could be as a matter of fact multiple concurrent and parallel design teams working in tandem on a global scale.

Anyway it really doesnt matter where etc.

IBM also has its R&D in Israel

The other 2 quotes you mention-

quote:
The company's NetBurst architecture didn't scale ........

All that changed, to some extent on a whim, with the Israeli-developed mobile.........


Both these quotes are from the link I provided in my comment-a previous article on the subject.

I make it a habit to quote my sources as far as possible,because I take out a portion of that contents to quote in my comment.

This could sometimes appear as taken out of context

To make my comment short & precise I give this quotes as /for reference purposes only.

Anyway nice discussing with you & have a nice day wherever you are based.
.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By crystal clear on 10/28/2007 2:46:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
And, according to all roadmaps, will be replaced by Nehalem uarch...


But-

Nehalem chief architect, Glen Hinton, tells DailyTech the philosophy behind 731 million transistor, 45nm Nehalem is an extension of the approach to Penryn and 65nm Core 2 Duo processors: a universal, robust core design that will scale from mobile to server applications.


IMC
By Parhel on 10/26/2007 1:32:03 PM , Rating: 4
I hope that after these come out, I never have to hear the words "Integrated Memory Controller" again. That has to be one of the most overused phrases in the English language, right after perhaps "Weapons of Mass Destruction."

For years, no fanboy argument could be complete with tossing that phrase around at least once per paragraph. Now we can all switch to arguing about something else.




RE: IMC
By TomZ on 10/26/2007 1:48:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
For years, no fanboy argument could be complete with tossing that phrase around at least once per paragraph. Now we can all switch to arguing about something else.

Yes, the debate will switch over to be which company's integrated memory controller is better. :o)


RE: IMC
By crystal clear on 10/27/2007 7:18:45 AM , Rating: 1
Here is a portion of an interview-

One of the most notable additions to Nehalem is its QuickPath architecture that includes an integrated memory controller. Can you tell us more about that and how it compares to Advanced Micro Devices' DirectConnect architecture?

In the spring of last year, Steve Pawlowski [an Intel senior fellow] gave a talk about tech insight and that question of an integrated memory controller came up, and I think Steve said accurately that we were perfectly aware of integrated memory controllers and we [Intel] had developed integrated memory controllers and we have killed more designs with integrated memory control than AMD has built, so our view was that integrated memory control was not required to deliver high performance.

I think the press began equating integrated memory control with high performance, and I think with Core 2 we retained the front-side bus architecture and we beat the pants off of everybody without the integrated memory controller. The argument was that it was an engineering decision and at some point it will make sense to integrate the memory controller, and when that happens we will. We looked at that trade-off with Nehalem and we decided for that generation it made sense.


The analogy I use is to look at the copper microprocessor used in [IBM's] PowerPC. They never delivered a microprocessor that even ran at half the clock speed of the then-available Intel processor. So if copper was so almighty important, why didn't it deliver? The metallization technology was not the determining factor of chip performance at that time. The transistors needed to get faster before the wires got faster. IBM made the wire faster but not the transistors, so it was like having a Formula One car between stoplights. We have copper technology and we worked on it for many years, and then we decided that the transistors were running fast enough to make the wires run faster. We then put copper into production, but we didn't deploy it until we needed it.



http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2185714,00.as...


RE: IMC
By ajfink on 10/28/2007 7:35:35 PM , Rating: 2
By then it will be AMD's 45nm quad- or octo-core processors with IMCs vs. Intel's. Should make for quite an interesting showdown.

Well, maybe AMD won't have an octo-core processor by then, :)


RE: IMC
By cochy on 10/26/2007 3:32:09 PM , Rating: 4
Ya...you'll only have to deal withNative-Quad core still. :P


RE: IMC
By KernD on 10/26/2007 7:30:38 PM , Rating: 2
No you won't, it says 8MB L2 cache shared, that means it must be a native quad core processor.

So, good new, we get rid of "Native-Quad core" also... what are the PR guys going to say now?


RE: IMC
By KernD on 10/27/2007 12:39:18 AM , Rating: 2
And if you look at the little picture titled "I am Nehalem" you can see there are 4 cores on one die.


What I'd like to see.
By Googer on 10/27/2007 2:32:12 AM , Rating: 2
I like the fact that they have integrated the FSB on to the CPU but I'd rather see Intel keep the socket LGA775 platform and disable the on die memory controller (via bios) when it's used on with DDR2 or motherboard that has a northbridge memory controller installed. I'd also like to see Intel ditch the "not invented here" syndrome and adopt an existing proven industry supported Hypertransport protocol.

Also, It would be nice if they took the AMD approach to on die FSB and allow backward computability with older memory technology, thus allowing users and oems to use the type of RAM most suitable for their budget or application.

These steps would go a long way to make future platforms better, more compatible, and more flexible in terms of features, performance, and cost.




RE: What I'd like to see.
By darkpaw on 10/27/2007 10:56:54 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Also, It would be nice if they took the AMD approach to on die FSB and allow backward computability with older memory technology, thus allowing users and oems to use the type of RAM most suitable for their budget or application.


AMD doesn't do this, its the primary reason everyone with a S939 got screwed. They changed the whole socket just to accommodate a new memory type. Maybe they'll do this for the DDR2/3 transition, but there are plenty of people still bitter about the last time.


RE: What I'd like to see.
By KernD on 10/27/2007 8:52:04 PM , Rating: 2
I have a S939 and I didn't get screwed in any way. I've had it for 2 and a half year. I'm skipping AM2 and going directly to AM2+.

How did anyone get screwed out of buying one? You could upgrade for a long time with that same socket, even after the DDR2 K8 were out you could still buy DDR K8. I could have upgraded my processor to a dual core with much higher clock speed if I had wanted too.

AM2 buyers didn't get screwed either, they can still upgrade to a Phenom. They won't have all the cool feature of HT3 and the split power plane for the IMC but there is always a down side to upgrading.

It's exactly like the first LGA775 for Intel, you can update the processor, but your FSB won't increase.


RE: What I'd like to see.
By TLCKurovski on 10/27/2007 7:19:37 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I like the fact that they have integrated the FSB on to the CPU but I'd rather see Intel keep the socket LGA775 platform and disable the on die memory controller
That would be very, very difficult. They would need to make compatible layouts for the sockets, they would need to include a mux for the two interfaces, they would need to keep a FSB interface and they would need to comunicate this interface to the XBar.
quote:
when it's used on with DDR2 or motherboard that has a northbridge memory controller installed.
And how would it know what was the kind of MB?
quote:
I'd also like to see Intel ditch the "not invented here" syndrome and adopt an existing proven industry supported Hypertransport protocol.
Go to Sunnyvale and try to license ccHT :)...

Of course, CSI is far from being a HT clone. Intel has different requirements, they should have different PtP interconnects.
quote:
Also, It would be nice if they took the AMD approach to on die FSB and allow backward computability with older memory technology, thus allowing users and oems to use the type of RAM most suitable for their budget or application.
This is difficult to do. And almost useless.


RE: What I'd like to see.
By Googer on 10/29/2007 9:57:03 AM , Rating: 2
As far as I know AMD does not hold the patent for HyperTranport, just as Intel does not hold the patent for PCI (and variants).

Using a motherboard memory controller and disabling the on die controller would not be impossible with a BIOS update. A CPU can detect the Chipset it's installed on and enable or disable it. Just like you can enable and disable hyperthreading, XD Bit, CPU serial number, and other CPU features etc.


RE: What I'd like to see.
By Googer on 10/29/2007 10:00:27 AM , Rating: 2
What I meant was, AMD included in their design was to allow for reverse compatibility with older DDR designs. Anandtech has the article on the topic. I think it was DDR3 maintaining reverse compatibility with DDR2.


How is Nehalem pronounced
By phatboye on 10/26/2007 11:57:51 AM , Rating: 2
What language is the name Nehalem derived from because from the way it's spelled it looks pretty akward to pronounce.




RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Noya on 10/26/2007 2:52:24 PM , Rating: 2
Native American?

If you look at most of the codenames, they're named after geographic features / locations near Intel sites. Willamette, Deschutes, Tualatin, Klamath and Nehalem are all rivers in Oregon. Prescott is Arizona of course.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Oregonian2 on 10/26/2007 6:56:59 PM , Rating: 3
Yes, and those rivers (etc) are all named using native American names.

(I'm in Hillsboro, Oregon where Intel has its largest
number of employees which also may be why things often are
named here.)

They're also towns (Tualatin, Deschutes, Nehalem, and Klamath Falls anyway), Universities (Willamette University), County names, restaurant names, and who knows what else.


RE: How is Nehalem pronounced
By Cullinaire on 10/27/2007 12:42:24 PM , Rating: 2
Small world - I just stumbled out of one of those fabs there. Ohh sweet night shift, how I love thee.


this is what peaks m curiosity...
By retrospooty on 10/26/2007 12:49:21 PM , Rating: 3
"All Bloomfield processors will feature support three DDR3 channels."

tri-channel DDR? Sweet ! more bandwidth=happy !

Can anyone confirm that?




By Doormat on 10/26/2007 2:00:35 PM , Rating: 2
Its been posted at other sites so it seems realisitic.

What I wonder is if you'll see 3 or 6 DIMM slots on motherboards. Imagine 6x2GB sticks - 12GB of RAM in a consumer PC! Even 3 2GB sticks and 6GB is pretty nice for a consumer system.

Also I would expect mobile processors based on this generation to have 2 channels due to power consumption and physical space available in a laptop.

As a Mac guy I look forward to this chip in the hopes we see a cheaper Mac Pro - no expensive FB-DIMMs and the possibility for a single socket four core system (and optionally a dual socket 8 and 16 core system).


RE: this is what peaks m curiosity...
By crystal clear on 10/27/2007 8:18:13 AM , Rating: 2
Interestingly, Bloomfield first appeared in a report way back in December 2005, listed as an eight-core CPU due late 2008. The source document was widely denounced at the time, but its list of codenames has proved accurate.

Here is the source-

Top Secret Intel Processor Plans Uncovered

http://www.tomshardware.com/2005/12/04/top_secret_...

Some portions of it-

Merom Is The Mother Of All Upcoming Processor Designs.

The introduction of the Merom design will be a turning point in Intel's product policy, because it will be the backbone for all processor families that go into the desktop, the mobile or the enterprise space


Read this 2005 report(rather long one) & compare it till today & you will see -how accurate it was.


By retrospooty on 10/27/2007 10:24:14 AM , Rating: 1
ya, the only thing you can say is Intel is executing to near perfection these days, while AMD flutters.

That roadmap had the first quad core's at Q1 2008, and Penryn later in 2008 as well.


The T2 factor
By kyleb2112 on 10/26/2007 5:00:04 PM , Rating: 2
AMD had better start looking for that other severed Terminator hand.




RE: The T2 factor
By Regs on 10/26/2007 11:03:55 PM , Rating: 2
Well let me hop in my time machine and see if AMD actually makes a processor faster than 1.9 Ghz.


RE: The T2 factor
By Zurtex on 10/27/2007 8:37:03 PM , Rating: 2
I get the sarcasm and the joke, but AMD has the current fastest "new cpu" clock speed on the market at the moment with 3.2 GHz.


RE: The T2 factor
By afkrotch on 10/28/2007 8:32:30 PM , Rating: 2
Really? I could have swore that IBM has their Power6 at 4.7 GHz that came out in May.


Hope I can make it another year
By darkpaw on 10/26/2007 12:14:17 PM , Rating: 1
Hopefully I'll be able to get another years use out of my S939 system, then I can go straight to this instead of getting one of the current dead end sockets. DDR3 only kind of worries me though, I doubt prices will drop a huge ammount in the next year.

I was thinking of upgrading early next year, but I think I can wait a while longer. Sure I can't get the best graphics out of newer engines like Crysis or UT3, but I can still play reasonably well at 1280x1024.

At least Intel will be able to deliver this on time, if not early.




RE: Hope I can make it another year
By Martimus on 10/26/07, Rating: 0
RE: Hope I can make it another year
By darkpaw on 10/26/2007 2:29:58 PM , Rating: 2
The fact that they already have ones that will boot Windows over a year ahead of time would be a good indicator to me.

Things could happen, and it could be delayed. I think right now things are looking really good for them though.


RE: Hope I can make it another year
By bobbronco on 10/26/2007 11:41:21 PM , Rating: 2
Actually they are already on track to tape out the next stepping of the Nehalem core later this quarter. That is another positive indicator for an "on-time" public launch by the end of next year.


RE: Hope I can make it another year
By Martimus on 11/21/2007 2:05:56 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, but they are puttin gin an integrated memory controller for the first time, along with using a true quad core die, both of which kill your yield.


Another bottleneck removed
By flurazepam on 10/26/2007 12:03:45 PM , Rating: 2
With the FSB/NB bottleneck removed, the opportunity for 4 or more cores to operate more efficiently and effectively, especially for HD video transcoding is something I've been waiting for a while. While currently on a Kentsfield, I'm going to sit the Penryn/Yorkfield/X38/48 ride out (despite the added extensions), and wait for Nehalem. By the time Nehalem comes out, more programs will have those extensions in main stream products and not betas. Nehalem with 8 cores will be the ticket then with the Core 2's fading into the background.




RE: Another bottleneck removed
By Golgatha on 10/26/2007 12:29:18 PM , Rating: 2
I agree about playing the waiting game, but for different reasons. Time to just sit it out and upgrade the graphics card occasionally to stay on top of the games over the next couple of years. My Q6600@3.0Ghz/4GB DDR2/*insert graphics card here* will hold me over until these CPUs hit the market and DDR3 gets within the reaches of mere mortals.

As far as productivity software is concerned, the software isn't even close to taking advantage of quad cores and in some cases dual cores, so I don't feel like I'll be missing out on anything for the next couple of years just sitting on my current config.


RE: Another bottleneck removed
By afkrotch on 10/28/2007 9:17:14 PM , Rating: 2
It really all depends. Architectural changes can still improve performance for single-threaded applications. I mean, which would you rather have? A Pentium D or a Core 2 Duo? Both are still dual cores.

Even the minor move to Penryn could net up to 10% increase in performance for some apps, while decreasing power utilization.

If you are in constant need of more performance (for whatever applications you are using), then hopping through all the latest is simply needed. Majority of us don't. I'm running a E6600 @ 3.33 ghz, 2GB DDR2, and 7900GTX. Until games start really utilizing multiple core or simply need higher performance from a single core, I'll be able to survive with my proc.


This pisses me off...
By Setsunayaki on 10/28/2007 5:37:33 PM , Rating: 2
The built in memory controller is being used to force people into buying DDR-3. DDR-2 has lower latencies and performs better than DDR-3.

Ive ran enough memory tests and since more multipliers exist as well as a lot more latency exists means that the quality of the memory is a lot lower.

The result?

You are being forced into buying DDR-3 because they cost less to produce than DDR-2 to produce, but actually can be sold for 2 - 3 times as much as DDR-3 having higher yields.

Also, having a 130w TDP? Forget about it...^_^

The TDP to a Quad Core 6600 today is 95w and of course I can overclock it and have fun...what makes it so that I Should spend my money to buy a processor that uses around 38 - 40% more power..Which means an Aftermarket cooler to achieve standard cooling will be forced upon you.

The funny thing is that unless one is playing the latest games at MAXIMUM quality and high resolution, you dont need a full power of a dual core or quad core...

You can actually downclock the processor, lower voltage even further.....Ive actually ran my processor at .85 - 1v and dropped the bus from 266 to 200 and ran at 1200mhz multiple cores and that has been enough to play games like guild wars combined with a downclocked video card at perfect framerate. ^_^




RE: This pisses me off...
By afkrotch on 10/28/2007 9:52:13 PM , Rating: 2
Actually you can play the latest games at Maximum quality with a single core system. It'll definitely change in the future, but for games available as of this date, single core is fine.

Only one game really makes use and that's Supreme Commander. Course that's a trash game.


RE: This pisses me off...
By cheetah2k on 10/28/2007 11:22:47 PM , Rating: 2
Today is the 28th of October 2007.

I'd hate to see Crysis on a single core....

Minimum System Requirements
OS Windows XP or Windows Vista
Processor 2.8 GHz or faster (XP) or 3.2 GHz or faster (Vista)
Memory 1.0 GB RAM (XP) or 1.5 GB RAM (Vista)
Video Card 256 MB
Hard Drive 12GB
Sound Card DirectX 9.0c compatible

Supported Processors:
Intel Pentium 4 2.8 GHz (3.2 GHz for Vista) or faster
Intel Core 2.0 GHz (2.2 GHz for Vista) or faster
AMD Athlon 2800+ (3200+ for Vista) or faster.

Supported Video Cards:
NVIDIA GeForce 6800 GT or greater; ATI Radeon 9800 Pro (Radeon X800 Pro for Vista) or greater. Laptop versions of these chipsets may work but are not supported. Integrated chipsets are not supported. Updates to your video and sound card drivers may be required.

Recommended System Requirements
OS Windows XP / Vista
Processor Intel Core 2 DUO @ 2.2GHz or AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+
Memory 2.0 GB RAM
GPU NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTS/640 or similar


New Processor Name? Core 3?
By BSMonitor on 10/26/2007 3:01:51 PM , Rating: 2
Any idea on naming for these new guys?

Core 3?

Penryn is still Core 2 right?




RE: New Processor Name? Core 3?
By James Holden on 10/26/2007 3:21:30 PM , Rating: 2
It sounds like there will be a totally new brand.


ICH10 & 1600fsb
By hellokeith on 10/26/2007 5:26:30 PM , Rating: 2
According to this Dailytech article re: X48..

http://www.dailytech.com/Intel+X48+P45+G45+Turn+Co...

ICH10 and 1600fsb will be featured on chipsets compatible with LGA775.




RE: ICH10 & 1600fsb
By James Holden on 10/26/2007 7:31:22 PM , Rating: 2
Right, but X48, P45 and G45 will support LGA775 but Tylersburg will support LGA1366. Typersburg will only be for Nehalem.


Intel manufacturing 45nm-goes into action
By crystal clear on 10/27/2007 8:34:01 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Intel's high-end 45nm Penryn offerings slated for release between now and Q4 2008.


CHANDLER, Ariz., Oct. 25, 2007 – Production of a new generation of microprocessors for PCs, laptops, servers and other computing devices officially began today inside of Intel Corporation's first high-volume 45 nanometer (nm) manufacturing factory in Chandler, Ariz.

Fab 32 is Intel's sixth 300mm wafer factory and its second factory to produce 45nm chips. Intel first produced 45nm processors in its Oregon development facility, called D1D, in January and is now moving into high-volume production with the opening of Fab 32. Two additional 45nm, 300mm manufacturing factories are scheduled to open next year in Kiryat Gat, Israel (Fab 28) and Rio Rancho, N.M. (Fab 11x). Using 300mm wafers lowers the production cost per chip while diminishing overall use of resources



http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/releases/20...




By crystal clear on 10/27/2007 9:00:55 AM , Rating: 2
As Intel looks to bring out its new, high-end Penryn family of 45-nm chips, the company should be able to drop the prices of older dual- and quad-core processors later this year.


Nehalem have 8MB L3 cache
By maroon1 on 10/26/2007 3:53:55 PM , Rating: 2
http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2007/10/26/intel_road...

According to this website Nehalem have 8MB L3 cache, not L2




Well...
By DeepBlue1975 on 10/27/2007 5:42:40 PM , Rating: 2
AMD hasn't yet released their "new generation" CPU and Intel is already leaking lots of details on their next gen chip, with it already having been taped out.

I hope ddr3 comes cheaper by that time, if the performance delta between those and my actual q6600 is 25% or more clock for clock, I guess it'll be quite attractive.

I also hope AMD has something to answer by then, otherwise, Intel's fast rolling strategy will slow down again and than we can all certainly forget about continuous and agressive price reductions, too.




Intel's Frankenstein?
By cheetah2k on 10/28/2007 11:17:51 PM , Rating: 2
Nehalem indeed looks like a super charged, neck bolted beast of a processor. It hast to be said that Intel continues to provide the goods while pushing the "upgrade" path to the limit...

Out of all of this, I really have to feel for the Motherboard manufacturers. Certainly on the Intel side, gone are the days of the chipsets and sockets that could last 8-12 months without production changes

I would guess that with so many chipset and SKU changes, the likes of Asus, Gigabyte, etc will have to be selling less of each product. This may also drive the prices up even further on enthuisast mobos due to an even shorter production run. It also doesn't give the mobo makers the opportunity to further HW fine tune chipsets 2-3 months after launch - leaving only bios upgrades as an option.

I also conclude that companies providing chipsets like Nvidia (using the 680i as an example) will be trying to milk that platform for as long as they can, all the while Intel will probably have 4-5 chipset changes to Nvidia's 1.

On the Intel platform nowdays, we, the consumer, can no longer laugh about that saying "my PC is already old tech - 2-3 months after buying it". This is definately the hard, expensive fact of the matter for those wanting the latest and greatest (like me!)...




3.0
By ih8having2createaccts on 10/31/2007 3:25:00 AM , Rating: 2
i'd sure like to see usb 3.0, pci-e 3.0, and sata iii ("3.0" (6.0 gbps) come out in time for nehalem.

i mean, we already have l3 cache and tri-channel ddr3 sdram on the list.

hmmm... maybe they should've made nehalem a TRI-core processor. it would've made a lot more sense. core "3!" get it? :P

*sigh*

/endcrazyrant




"The Space Elevator will be built about 50 years after everyone stops laughing" -- Sir Arthur C. Clarke

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September 18, 2007, 12:04 PM













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