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Print 15 comment(s) - last by TomZ.. on Dec 17 at 3:17 PM


  (Source: Intel)
Intel updates its line of solid-state drives

Earlier this year, Intel thrust itself into the world of solid state drives (SSDs). The company launched the Z-U130 series of NAND flash-based SSDs which used the standard USB 2.0 interface.

Intel's Z-U130 product family consisted of 1GB, 2GB, 4GB and 8GB models. Performance was rather meager with read speeds of 28MB/sec and write speeds of 20MB/sec.

Not one to let a new product languish in a competitive market, Intel is introducing its follow-up to the Z-U130: the Z-P140. Intel's Z-P140 SSDs forgo the USB 2.0 interface and instead use a PATA interface.

Due to efficient packaging, the Z-P140 PATA SSDs measure just 12x18x1.8mm -- 400 times smaller than a 1.8" HDD -- and weigh only 0.6 grams. Power consumption is a miniscule 1.1mW while idle and 300mW during read/write operations. The Mean-Time Before Failure (MTBF) of the Z-P140 PATA SSDs, which use Intel SD54B and SD58B NAND flash chips, is 2.5 million hours.

The Z-P140 PATA SSDs are available in 2GB of 4GB modules; however, they can be expanded up to 16GB by using four 4GB modules. In addition, read and write speeds are now faster at 40MB/sec and 30MB/sec respectively.

"Our mission is to provide world-class non-volatile SSD and caching solutions that are designed, optimized and validated to enhance Intel Architecture-based computing platforms," said Pete Hazen, Intel's NAND Products Group director of marketing. "Our customers are finding the Intel Z-P140 PATA SSD to be the right size, fit and performance for their pocketable designs. This is Intel's latest offering as we continue to expand our product line of reliable, feature-rich and high-performing SSDs."

Intel's new line of SSDs aren't likely to give competing SSD manufacturers Samsung, Toshiba or Mtron much pause -- SSDs from those manufacturers come in larger 1.8" and 2.5" form-factors and are at least twice as fast in read/write operations. However, Intel is likely to target cell phone, portable media player (PMP) and UMPC vendors.

In fact, Intel's new SSDs sound like a perfect fit for a probable ASUS Eee PC 16G.



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Would be perfect for
By FITCamaro on 12/17/2007 10:54:33 AM , Rating: 4
A hard drive in a handheld gaming device. Such as the successor to the PSP or Nintendo DS.




RE: Would be perfect for
By ChronoReverse on 12/17/2007 11:19:44 AM , Rating: 2
It looks an awful lot like another incompatible but similar to MicroSD(HC) flash card.


RE: Would be perfect for
By Roy2001 on 12/17/2007 1:04:38 PM , Rating: 2
It looks an awful lot like another incompatible but similar to MicroSD(HC) flash card.
=================================================
The purpose of this drive is to solder on MB directly for MID/UMPC.


RE: Would be perfect for
By omnicronx on 12/17/2007 1:10:06 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Performance was rather meager with read speeds of 28MB/sec and write speeds of 20MB/sec.
And this would give what advantage over current flash memory being used? Im not sure about the numbers but i thought that current flash memory has read/write speeds of at least that.


RE: Would be perfect for
By omnicronx on 12/17/2007 1:11:39 PM , Rating: 2
oops read it wrong..
quote:
In addition, read and write speeds are now faster at 40MB/sec and 30MB/sec respectively.
This makes much more sense...


RE: Would be perfect for
By TomZ on 12/17/2007 3:17:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And this would give what advantage over current flash memory being used?

It depends what you're comparing it to. This is basically an SSD on a "chip" designed for OEM use. Existing flash memory is either raw flash memory chips, or packaged flash drives (SATA, PATA, USB, etc.).


RAID 0
By Mudvillager on 12/17/2007 11:03:18 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The Z-P140 PATA SSDs are available in 2GB of 4GB modules; however, they can be expanded up to 16GB by using four 4GB modules. In addition, read and write speeds are now faster at 40MB/sec and 30MB/sec respectively.
In RAID 0? 160MB/s read 120MB/s write in such a small and convenient package doesn't sound all that bad =)




RE: RAID 0
By phaxmohdem on 12/17/2007 11:45:48 AM , Rating: 2
In Soviet Russia, Windows Vista could almost run YOU on that :P


RE: RAID 0
By amanojaku on 12/17/2007 12:24:45 PM , Rating: 1
Uh... what?


RE: RAID 0
By FITCamaro on 12/17/2007 12:38:33 PM , Rating: 2
Family Guy joke.


RE: RAID 0
By sdoorex on 12/17/2007 12:44:13 PM , Rating: 2
It was a Yakov Smirnoff joke first that was called Russian reversal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakov_Smirnoff#Russia...


RE: RAID 0
By omnicronx on 12/17/2007 1:06:34 PM , Rating: 2
That comment was far too witty, he must have used the 'Yakov Smirnoff Joke Generator' listed on that wiki.
quote:
http://muddbutt.com/news_cats.php?cat_id=3


Not slow
By Lonyo on 12/17/2007 12:24:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Performance was rather meager with read speeds of 28MB/sec and write speeds of 20MB/sec

I'd argue that considering the size, those speeds are fine. Sure, it may not be as fast as hard drives which can hold hundreds of GB, but when you are only filling up to 8GB, does it really matter if speeds aren't 50+MB/s?
If you look at the speeds of something like a 1.8" mechanical hard drive, they aren't really all that fast.




RE: Not slow
By FITCamaro on 12/17/2007 12:39:49 PM , Rating: 2
They were comparing it to 1.8" form factor SSDs though.


RE: Not slow
By melgross on 12/17/2007 12:59:20 PM , Rating: 2
That's the max you can get out of USB 2. The PATA speeds are what you can get from the drives themselves.

The question here though, is how much do these things cost? I can't find any pricing.


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