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Print 11 comment(s) - last by Regs.. on Jun 10 at 9:23 PM

UQ Communications expects to serve 90% of Japan by 2012

The first of the 4G mobile data services to debut in the U.S. was Sprint and Clearwire's WiMAX service. In America, the rollout of WiMAX is still very weak with only a few major cities having access to WiMAX today. Clearwire plans to roll WiMAX to other American cities soon, but the challenge will be to beat LTE to market.

While LTE is the preferred specification in the U.S., WiMAX is a popular service overseas. Intel has announced that it has invested $43 million USD into a WiMAX provider called UQ Communications. UQ recently launched a trial of its WiMAX service called UQ WiMAX in Tokyo. Areas served by the WiMAX trial include 23 wards, Yokohama, Kawasaki, and Tokyo International Airport.

The service will be formally launched on July 1 reports InformationWeek. Intel says that its investment in the company is to help UQ roll out and expand its WiMAX network in Japan. UQ hopes to offer WiMAX to 90% of the population of Japan by the end of 2012.

Intel Capital's Arvind Sodhani said, "Intel Capital's investment in UQ Communications is one of our most significant commitments in developing the WiMAX ecosystem around the globe. UQ's WiMAX deployment in Japan is a spectacular example of technology innovation being put to work."

Intel is offering UQ more than money. The chipmaker is also working with computer vendors and network operators to introduce more computers and devices that can take advantage of WiMAX service. Intel says that its goal is to create awareness and an ecosystem for WiMAX technology.



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I like how...
By xfactor91 on 6/9/09, Rating: 0
RE: I like how...
By smackababy on 6/9/2009 11:43:41 AM , Rating: 5
Japan actually moves technology forward. The US, on the other hand, would rather monopolize what is already out and prevent competition.


RE: I like how...
By dragonbif on 6/9/2009 12:10:11 PM , Rating: 2
That and Japan is a good proving ground for this type of stuff. They have a much grater user base per square mile (or kilometer) then any of our cities do. The cost to roll this stuff out all over Japan is alot less then here in the US with so many small cities that are spread so far apart. But they really do like new tech but then so do I.


RE: I like how...
By barjebus on 6/9/2009 2:04:23 PM , Rating: 2
Having worked on WiMax for a year with a smaller company like UQ, I can say that WiMax is a pipe dream...the marketing behind it is simply lies with regards to performance, reliability, robustness, and service coverage.


RE: I like how...
By icanhascpu on 6/9/2009 2:47:08 PM , Rating: 2
GEE I wonder what would be a cure for that on yeah wifi so we dont have line monopolies.


RE: I like how...
By Regs on 6/10/2009 9:23:52 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Japan actually moves technology forward. The US, on the other hand, would rather monopolize what is already out and prevent competition. </quote.

Intel says that its investment in the company is to help UQ roll out and expand its WiMAX network in Japan. UQ hopes to offer WiMAX to 90% . of the population of Japan by the end of 2012


I hope UQ's service does not suck then...or that would make your comment completely irrelevant.


RE: I like how...
By kenji4life on 6/9/2009 12:52:00 PM , Rating: 2
I live in an area of Tokyo which although located on the outer edge of Tokyo, has UQ wimax coverage. Their free trial is very tempting (although it ends in July). My current internet is 160 mbit fiber, but at 20 dollars a month less and coverage anywhere I want to go in the Tokyo/Kanagawa area, it's a big upgrade.

Too bad I don't have a Wimax card or I would have tried this already.

I wonder xfactor91 why you consider investing a small chunk of money in a promising technology in an area full of middle-class/upper-middle-class businessmen who rely on their laptops day in-day out. 43 million isn't exactly going out on a ledge for Intel.

I can see a good return on investment for Intel here.. Japan is incredibly as hard a place to find a "hotspot" as some pretty shabby countries I have been to. NRT is a prime example with its wifi which costs money.

I think Wimax will do better here in Japan than it will do in the USA, at least in the short term.


RE: I like how...
By smackababy on 6/9/2009 1:56:26 PM , Rating: 2
Japan doesn't have the rampant monopolistic internet companies (as far as I know, only vacationed there) as the US does. That is why investing in WiMax in the US is futile. We are lucky to have 50mbps internet connections here, and if we do have them, they are overpriced compared to every other country in the world.


RE: I like how...
By xfactor91 on 6/9/2009 3:52:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I wonder xfactor91 why you consider investing a small chunk of money in a promising technology in an area full of middle-class/upper-middle-class businessmen who rely on their laptops day in-day out. 43 million isn't exactly going out on a ledge for Intel.


well look at New York City, if they rapidly developed Wimax there look at all the people who would benefit. Our internet infrastructure blows in america thats why i think they should expand it here, but also i do understand what your saying but we have places like that here too. Think about just in a few blocks of New York (wall street) and things our businessmen would really benefit from that.


RE: I like how...
By ChuckDriver on 6/9/2009 6:11:42 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Too bad I don't have a Wimax card or I would have tried this already.


I bought an Intel WiFi 5350 PCI Express Mini Card for my Dell Mini 9, that also supports WiMAX, on eBay for about $22 shipped. I haven't used its WiMAX capabilities yet, but it has much better Linux support than the Broadcom based card previously installed. I'm looking forward to the roll-out of Clearwire WiMAX in Atlanta just to try it out.


I wonder...
By albundy2 on 6/10/2009 3:54:51 AM , Rating: 2
if they're going to traffic shape Netflix like Clear does in Portland? What's the point in high speed access if you cripple the traffic that can take advantage of it.




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