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He's looking to bring Intel up to speed

ARM-based chipmakers may have beat Intel to the punch when it comes to mobile, but the company famously known for PC chips is looking to make a big splash at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) next week.  
 
According to a new report from Re/code, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has big plans to unveil devices at CES that will be available in "several months" or a year. These include wearables, Quark chips and Intel-powered tablets and PCs. 
 
“Wearables is wide open,” said Krzanich. “What you will see at CES is that we are actually going to bring some very innovative wearables to the show that are developed and manufactured here.”
 
Devices such as wearables will be powered by Quark chips, which were introduced early last year. These chips have found a home in heating and air conditioning systems in Europe, but will move into other devices soon. 
 
Quark chips, according to Krzanich, will make devices smart and able to communicate. He didn't care to elaborate much on that. 


Intel CEO Brian Krzanich [SOURCE: bgr.in]

While Intel doesn't have any concrete plans for smartphones, since Apple and Google's Android (specifically Samsung) have taken over that space, it wants to power 40 million tablets sold this year alone. Krzanich said Intel chips would make these tablets perform in ways never seen before, specifically with innovations in imaging.
 
Intel realizes it can no longer just focus on PCs, as that industry continues to slump in favor of mobile devices. Krzanich said the key to turning that around is to innovate, and innovate quickly.
 
Intel looks to be on the right path. In November 2013, it was announced that Intel created a new division for internet-connected devices. 

Source: Re/code



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Sigh...
By amanojaku on 1/4/2014 12:42:11 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
Quark chips, according to Krzanich, will make devices smart and able to communicate. He didn't care to elaborate much on that.
Tiffany, I have to say I'm disappointed in you. You get a lot of flack from visitors here for things I think are trivial, but this is a mistake you should never make. A company produces an SoC, and you need the company to explain what it's for? Here's a hint: it's a miniature computer.

Its CPU runs at 400Hz. It has 16KB of cache. It has 512KB of ECC-protected eSRAM. It has an integrated DDR3 (up to 2GiB) controller with built-in ECC (apparently, so you can use cheaper, smaller non-ECC DRAM). It has integrated PCIe, SPI, USB 2.0. It can connect to Ethernet (10/100), Bluetooth, GPIO, SD, SDIO, eMMC, cellular...

Stick this thing on a PCB, add RAM, storage, and whatever hardware is appropriate, and you've got an electronic device. Say, an ATM, a kiosk, a tablet PC, a smart watch, a smartphone, a smart TV, a video game console (like those Atari Flashback things)... Even a desktop PC.

And it does all this in a package smaller than your fingernail (15mm x 15mm, or .6in x .6in), operating in temperatures up to 70C, generating only 2.2W. Whatever ARM is in, Quark is targeting.

As a tech journalist, you should know these things. :(




RE: Sigh...
By hrrmph on 1/4/2014 8:03:17 PM , Rating: 2
Intel hasn't:

- Got a decent baseband solution for phones;

- Found a way to help Microsoft put 4G-LTE on the Surface Pro 2 tablet;

- Figured out how to get all-USB 3.0 into a desktop chipset;

- Found a way to get all-SATA 6.0Gbs into a desktop chipset;

- Integrated WiFi-AC into any desktop or laptop chipset at all; or

- Discovered a way to build a chipset that enables more than 4 x USB 3.0 on a 17" high-end workstation / desktop replacement laptop.

And they want to lead the way on wearables?

...yes, I'm sure they do...

Tell 'em to go back and finish what they started first.


RE: Sigh...
By deltaend on 1/5/2014 4:32:15 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Found a way to get all-SATA 6.0Gbs into a desktop chipset

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=55
quote:
Figured out how to get all-USB 3.0 into a desktop chipset

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=54
quote:
Integrated WiFi-AC into any desktop or laptop chipset at all

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=52
quote:
Discovered a way to build a chipset that enables more than 4 x USB 3.0 on a 17" high-end workstation / desktop replacement laptop.

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=56

Took me 2 minutes on Google. Not to call you an idiot but... let's just say that you like to type without knowing what you are typing about.


RE: Sigh...
By retrospooty on 1/5/2014 1:16:21 PM , Rating: 2
LOL. Sounds like he was too busy whining about things Intel doesn't do to notice what Intel does. They are the last company in the world I would want to focus on mobile if I were ARM, or anyone making ARM chips. Intel has time money, talent and more manufacturing experience than all others combined.


RE: Sigh...
By cyberguyz on 1/5/2014 8:35:01 PM , Rating: 2
In one way I would agree but in others I have to agree with the OP in that Intel appears to be a little behind in the Desktop market. Intel still has work to do in its desktop chipset products to fully integrate full USB3, SATA3 and wireless AC capability (doubt that last will ever happen).

That said, ARM has a mighty big following in the Mobile world and has already reached critical mass. If Intel hopes to move their x86 architecture to mobile, they will have a pretty long, uphill battle on their hands.

If Intel hopes to penetrate the ARM world, it will need to come up with its own implementation of the ARM specs like everybody else (i.e Apple, Qualcomm, Samsung, etc).

It wouldn't be the first time Intel had eat crow and to toe the prevailing line in order to penetrate a market (looks back at Intel's cross-licensing with AMD and implementation of AMD's 64-bit extensions, AMD64, in the desktop world).


RE: Sigh...
By retrospooty on 1/6/2014 10:49:13 AM , Rating: 2
"It wouldn't be the first time Intel had eat crow and to toe the prevailing line in order to penetrate a market (looks back at Intel's cross-licensing with AMD and implementation of AMD's 64-bit extensions, AMD64, in the desktop world)."

Exactly... AMD beat intel with 64bit, and more importantly dual core and integrated memory controller and for a time AMD had the fastest chips available... Then Intel came back with a vengeance and AMD cant begin to catch them. Thus the thought above, If I were ARM or an ARM licensee, the last thing in the world I want to see is Intel focusing on mobile.


RE: Sigh...
By cyberguyz on 1/5/2014 8:17:28 PM , Rating: 4
You do understand that the poster was asking about chipsets with natively integrated features, right? He was not asking about motherboards, drivers or external wireless adapters.

quote:

quote:
Found a way to get all-SATA 6.0Gbs into a desktop chipset

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=55


Your search failed. Poster commwented on Intel Chipsets not motherboards.

All of those MOTHERBOARDS you linked have a mixture of 3.0 GB/sec SATA2 and SATA3. None of them have an Intel Chipset that enables ONLY 6.0 GB/Sec SATA3 . Any additional SATA3 support is provided by discreet controller chips from guys like Marvell.

quote:

quote:
Figured out how to get all-USB 3.0 into a desktop chipset

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=54


Poster commented on the lack of an INTEL CHIPSET that integrates nothing but USB3 ports and you give him a page of driver links? Seriously?

Most intel chipsets only provide no more than 4 NATIVE USB3 ports. Other ports are provided bu discreet controllers from guys like NEC and ASMedia. These are NOT integrated into the Intel Chipset.

quote:

quote:
Integrated WiFi-AC into any desktop or laptop chipset at all

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=52


Poster was commenting on the lack of 802.11ac wireless support integrated into an Ingel Chipset and you point him at an add-on Intel adapter at WALMART? Why? A wireless adapter is not an Intel Chipset with integrated WiFi AC (802.11ac) support.

quote:

quote:
Discovered a way to build a chipset that enables more than 4 x USB 3.0 on a 17" high-end workstation / desktop replacement laptop.

http://r.deltaend.net/?r=56


Again a link to a MONTHERBOARD rather than a chipset that provides more than 4 NATIVE USB3 ports.

In other words your response has totally failed to address the observations made by the original poster at all. And to add insult to injury you continue on to add this:

quote:
Took me 2 minutes on Google. Not to call you an idiot but... let's just say that you like to type without knowing what you are typing about.


Seems to me the wrong person posted without knowing what he was typing about.

Oh, in case you don't know what an Intel Chipset is, I recommend you familiarize yourself with the products described in the following links:

These are Intel mainstream chipets:
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/library/vie...

And these are Intel's Performance chipsets:
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/library/vie...

THOSE are chipsets. Not Motherboards. Not Drivers. And not wireless adapters. There are an awful lot of them, yet not a single one of these provides the integrated, native features the poster mentioned.


RE: Sigh...
By deltaend on 1/6/2014 2:27:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
You do understand that the poster was asking about chipsets with natively integrated features, right? He was not asking about motherboards, drivers or external wireless adapters.


It's hard to know exactly what the initial poster was referring to, but it seemed to me that he was referring to Intel producing various products (or lack thereof).

quote:
Your search failed. Poster commwented on Intel Chipsets not motherboards.


I gave him a list of Intel motherboards which contain native Intel chipsets on them (not Marvell). Do a quick search for MB DQ67SW which is by Intel, it supports SATA 6GBps and the design is 100% Intel chipset. Even looking at the manual for this MB, it clearly states, "Six SATA interfaces through the Intel Q67 Express Chipset with IntelĀ® Rapid
Storage Technology RAID support"

quote:
Poster commented on the lack of an INTEL CHIPSET that integrates nothing but USB3 ports and you give him a page of driver links? Seriously?


I gave him a page that lists all of the chipsets that are compatible with USB 3.0 from Intel, on the Intel website. And no, you are incorrect that ALL MB's only have 4 native USB 3 ports. I'm using an older chipset (about a year or so) on my machine and I have 6 USB 3 ports all native Intel.

quote:
Poster was commenting on the lack of 802.11ac wireless support integrated into an Ingel Chipset and you point him at an add-on Intel adapter at WALMART? Why? A wireless adapter is not an Intel Chipset with integrated WiFi AC (802.11ac) support.


Ummmm, Intel is producing an AC card so they have a chipset that produces 802.11AC. Just about all laptops still use replaceable wifi cards so pretty much the only time you are going to get wifi fully integrated into a MB is if you buy a SoC and I wasn't aware that we are talking about SoC's. Now, if you can find where it is that he started talking about SoC's, I would be more than happy to concede this point. And I pointed him to a Walmart page because I thought it was funny to show that they are common enough to be purchased at Walmart.

quote:
Oh, in case you don't know what an Intel Chipset is, I recommend you familiarize yourself with the products described in the following links:

These are Intel mainstream chipets:
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/library/vie...

And these are Intel's Performance chipsets:
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/library/vie...

THOSE are chipsets. Not Motherboards. Not Drivers. And not wireless adapters. There are an awful lot of them, yet not a single one of these provides the integrated, native features the poster mentioned.


*Cough* Ok:
Oh, in case you don't know what an Intel Chipset is, I recommend you familiarize yourself with this Wikipedia definition of what a chipset is:
quote:
In computing, the term chipset is commonly used to refer to a set of specialized chips on a computer's motherboard or an expansion card.


So, a chipset can also be part of an exansion card, like an 802.11AC card that Intel produces.

Secondly:
http://r.deltaend.net/?r=57
quote:
Integrated USB 3.0 support, provides greater enhancement in performance with a design data rate of up to 5 gigabits per second (Gbps) with up to 6 USB 3.0 ports.

quote:
Next generation high-speed storage interface supporting up to 6Gb/s transfer rates for optimal data access with up to 4 SATA 6Gb/s ports.


And that was just the first one I clicked on. I suggest that YOU go read what you link before you post back again because it seems to me that for being so combative, you fail pretty badly at actually reading (or perhaps it's a disease that's spreading).


RE: Sigh...
By cyberguyz on 1/6/2014 12:48:17 PM , Rating: 2
Ok, I wasn't going to call you an idiot, but it seems that either your command of the English language is really lacking or you are insisting on being an idiot.

Let's post the OP's comments yet again...

quote:
Intel hasn't:

- Got a decent baseband solution for phones;
- Found a way to help Microsoft put 4G-LTE on the Surface Pro 2 tablet;

- Figured out how to get all-USB 3.0 into a desktop chipset ;
- Found a way to get all-SATA 6.0Gbs into a desktop chipset ;

- Integrated WiFi-AC into any desktop or laptop chipset at all; or

- Discovered a way to build a chipset that enables more than 4 x USB 3.0 on a 17" high-end workstation / desktop replacement laptop .

...


Note the highlighted bits. "DESKTOP CHIPSET" "DESKTOP OR LAPTOP CHIPSET". From your latest post I will give you the last one simply because you find a mobile chipset that provides up to 6 NATIVE USB3 ports. That is discounted by the fact that it is mobile chipset and not a desktop chipset. So half a kudo for that. Also it provides no more than 4 SATA 3 (6GB/s) ports.

Now, the fact that you are quoting wikipedia as any kind of expert information tells me just how uninformed you really are. I have given you links to all of Intel's CHIPSET offerings, yet you are insisting that discreet USB, SATA or WiFi controllers provide native support for anything integrated into the chipset. If it is discreet controller it is NOT integrated, If the function is not a part of the computer's main chipset, it is not NATIVE. Discreet controllers do not provide native support.

I am calling both you and the author if that wiki article wrong on that count. Discreet controllers are NOT chipsets and they most certainly are NOT Intel desktop or laptop chipsets. Show me one chipset, in Intel's chipset list that provides native 802.11ac support.

There is only one case where I can provide credence to that wiki article, and that is where an entire system is included on an add-in card. When the CPU, Memory, power and bus controllers are included on the add-in card a CONTROLLER CHIPSET (not the same as a desktop or notebook chipset) is required to coordinate it. An example of these are some high-end SCSI/SAS controllers boards where a CPU like an Intel i960 is used for handling RAID parity. A WiFi ac add-in board does not fall into this category.


RE: Sigh...
By deltaend on 1/7/2014 4:15:16 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
- Figured out how to get all-USB 3.0 into a desktop chipset;

- Found a way to get all-SATA 6.0Gbs into a desktop chipset;


http://r.deltaend.net/?r=59

quote:
Integrated USB 3.0 support, provides greater enhancement in performance with a design data rate of up to 5 gigabits per second (Gbps) with up to 4 USB 3.0 ports.


quote:
Next-generation high-speed storage interface supporting up to 6 Gb/s transfer rates for optimal data access with up to 2 SATA ports.


Do I really have to go through each and every chipset and post them individually for you? I mean, seriously I figured that teach a man to fish, but clearly I'm the only one who can read these pages and post links.

quote:
quote:
Integrated WiFi-AC into any desktop or laptop chipset at all


And there is another chip, chipset, 802.11AC motherboard maker that has all of these integrated into a single chipset? Again, I think your definition of what a chipset actually is, is far too narrow and therefore flawed.

quote:
Also it provides no more than 4 SATA 3 (6GB/s) ports.


Right, and the question was? Oh, that's right, that wasn't the question so why would I have answered that?

quote:
Now, the fact that you are quoting wikipedia as any kind of expert information tells me just how uninformed you really are.


Not the only place where I found the same data, but you go ahead and cite your source and let's see how much more authoritative it is. Oh, that's right, you didn't cite any sources, so you really don't get to criticize and tell me that your source is better than mine. Why don't you go update that Wikipedia article and see how long it takes for another Wikipedia contributor to call you on the carpet regarding your source to make that change? Those articles are edited and sourced by dozens of people in the IT world, but I guess you are smarter and more informed than them all.

quote:
If it is discreet controller it is NOT integrated, If the function is not a part of the computer's main chipset, it is not NATIVE. Discreet controllers do not provide native support.


And I'll give you that, but again, please show me a cpu, chipset, mb, 802.11AC company that has all of these integrated into a single piece of silicon and used in desktops/laptops. That's right, there isn't any because everyone only ever uses discrete wifi chips with a few exceptions. My assumption is that is what the OP was referring to since he is asking for something that doesn't really exist in the real world and may never exist.

quote:
I am calling both you and the author if that wiki article wrong on that count. Discreet controllers are NOT chipsets and they most certainly are NOT Intel desktop or laptop chipsets. Show me one chipset, in Intel's chipset list that provides native 802.11ac support.

There is only one case where I can provide credence to that wiki article, and that is where an entire system is included on an add-in card. When the CPU, Memory, power and bus controllers are included on the add-in card a CONTROLLER CHIPSET (not the same as a desktop or notebook chipset) is required to coordinate it. An example of these are some high-end SCSI/SAS controllers boards where a CPU like an Intel i960 is used for handling RAID parity. A WiFi ac add-in board does not fall into this category.


Chipset (chip-set), by the very word itself it defines itself as a set of chips in a discrete group that function together. I'm not seeing anywhere where it is defined by such rigid terms as to what you are describing. Now, I think you are confusing chipset with SoC (System on a Chip) which actually falls into the exact definition of what you just described. In that case, you are right, a WiFi chipset does NOT fall into the SoC definition.


RE: Sigh...
By deltaend on 1/7/2014 4:27:55 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
There is only one case where I can provide credence to that wiki article, and that is where an entire system is included on an add-in card. When the CPU, Memory, power and bus controllers are included on the add-in card a CONTROLLER CHIPSET (not the same as a desktop or notebook chipset) is required to coordinate it. An example of these are some high-end SCSI/SAS controllers boards where a CPU like an Intel i960 is used for handling RAID parity. A WiFi ac add-in board does not fall into this category.


Actually, I may be using the SoC definition a bit too liberally, the integration of a (CG)PU/Memory/Controller into a single card has a name, but it's not coming to me at the moment. Obviously it is a chipset but the name for this particular type of chipset escapes me. More Googling is required to refresh my memory.


RE: Sigh...
By extide on 1/7/2014 2:29:20 PM , Rating: 2
- Got a decent baseband solution for phones;
-LTE Baseband is coming soon, so this is ~true.
- Found a way to help Microsoft put 4G-LTE on the Surface Pro 2 tablet;
-See above.

- Figured out how to get all-USB 3.0 into a desktop chipset;
All intel Chipsets from 6 series and later include USB 3.0, and as a bonus, they ALSO include 2.0 ports.

- Found a way to get all-SATA 6.0Gbs into a desktop chipset;
All intel chipsets from 7 series (except X79) onwards support 6 sata3/6gbit ports. (It was only the 6 series that had 2/4 of sata 3/2)

- Integrated WiFi-AC into any desktop or laptop chipset at all; or
It would be DUMB to include a wifi controller into a pc chipset (proof is in the fact that NOBODY does this)
However, Intel does and has always built some of the BEST wifi chipsets on the market, and does currently have the 7000 series of wifi chipsets....

- Discovered a way to build a chipset that enables more than 4 x USB 3.0 on a 17" high-end workstation / desktop replacement laptop.
Yes... they have... Read here: http://www.anandtech.com/show/6989/ and see that their modern chipsets can support up to 6 USB 3.0 root ports (most motherboards have hubs built on to the board to add more ports, and/or additional 3rd party controllers)

Do some research before you troll.

Fail.


RE: Sigh...
By extide on 1/7/2014 2:31:59 PM , Rating: 2
Oh, and for an example of an actual motherboard that does all of the above, see that link towards the end of my post above.


Prepare yourselves for 3D tablets...eventually
By bupkus on 1/3/2014 4:05:06 PM , Rating: 2
It seems to me tablets are a perfect vehicle for 3D imaging. You sit close enough to only require a single viewer which can be tethered via wire or wireless.*
Also, I can see a possible beneficial use of 3D for desktop movement of windows or web page components.

*This speculation is not based on a knowledge of current bandwidth or screen refresh specifications.

Anyways, it sound pretty cool to me.




By hughlle on 1/3/2014 4:55:27 PM , Rating: 2
I agree on the tablet point, but also disagree. A huge number of people use tablets for viewing media in a social manner, be it that easier method of showing friends videos, or lying in bed with a partner or child watching something.

It'll certainly happen eventually, not that I want it. I've used 3d TVs and I consider them a complete waste of money. 3d, like wearables, just hold no appeal to me.


By CaedenV on 1/3/2014 5:13:08 PM , Rating: 2
3D interfaces will probably never get anywhere, but being able to view 3D content on a tablet would be neat because you could use passive 3D technologies to remove the need for glasses, which would be fun for games and videos.

Otherwise I am afraid that 3D is confined to the realm of HMDs and other such systems. People hate wearing glasses, and watches, and other such devices. The idea that wearables are the future is ridiculous.

The future is in super small devices needed to make things like smart homes and self driving cars available to mass markets in a safe and secure way. Whoever cracks those two markets will win big. Really big.


By JKflipflop98 on 1/5/2014 2:15:38 PM , Rating: 2
I don't think it's so much that people don't like 3D, I think it's more that the major 3D content we've seen really, REALLY sucks.

I have an Oculus Rift DK and it really opens your eyes to what can happen in the future. For instance, there's a program called VRCinema you can use to watch normal or 3D movies. When you have the Rift on looking around the theater, it looks absolutely real. No eye strain. No convergence issues. Just perfect 3D as I would see in normal life.

Then you play the 3D movies. . . and wow it's bad. The convergence is WAY off. It hurts to try to focus on things in the scene. It's just like being at the actual theater watching a 3D movie. Terrible experience. But then you look down at the rest of the seats in the virtual theater, and it's perfection.

I would argue people dont like 3D because the content blows and the major picture houses have never hired anyone with a single shred of sense about how to make a proper 3D recording.

It's pretty stupid to think "people don't want 3D". . . because that's how we naturally view the world. Watching something in a 2D plane is not. It would be more fitting to say "people don't want crappy 3D".


By retrospooty on 1/6/2014 12:44:29 PM , Rating: 2
"I have an Oculus Rift DK and it really opens your eyes to what can happen in the future. For instance, there's a program called VRCinema you can use to watch normal or 3D movies. When you have the Rift on looking around the theater, it looks absolutely real. No eye strain. No convergence issues. Just perfect 3D as I would see in normal life."

Ya, but the Oculous Rift is a 3d headset, thus eliminating the need for the glasses, it IS the glasses. There isnt a way to do it with a TV / Screen across the room. Eyes weren't evolved to see that way, thus the glasses to trick the focus. The issue is, as you mentioned it sucks and will never catch on.


Pentium IV
By phatboye on 1/3/2014 11:00:36 PM , Rating: 2
<misquote> These chips have found a home in heating <sic> systems in Europe, but will move into other devices soon.</misquote>

I though the Netburst architecture was dead?




RE: Pentium IV
By amanojaku on 1/3/2014 11:46:24 PM , Rating: 2
Why would you throw out a perfectly good space heater? The product label stuck to the front door of the house says "It's Hell Inside". Perfect for this time of year.


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