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Print 18 comment(s) - last by foolsgambit11.. on Oct 3 at 12:50 PM

Not quite a tricorder, University of Leeds device still promises ELISA-like medical diagnosis as well as other speedy results

ELISA, or Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Essay, has been the de facto test for detecting many diseases and conditions that assail the body. Unfortunately, the tests require urine or blood samples, skilled technicians and several hours to complete. A group of University of Leeds scientists may just do away with the wait and difficulty of ELISA tests with a new device in development.

The project which may spawn the replacement, in a bit of an ironic twist, is called ELISHA for Electro-Immunointerfaces and Surface Nanobiotechnology: A Heterodoxical Approach. The 2.7M € project delves into new methods for electronic measurements and attaching antibodies to different kinds of surfaces.

The Leeds team has already shown promise for such a device with their new detectors which can return results in as little time as 15 minutes. The simple device uses antibodies which are attached to a sensing surface to detect known biochemical markers. So far they have been able to tune the detector to see various types of cancers, strokes, fungal infections, heart disease and multiple sclerosis.

Dr. Paul Millner, coordinator for ELISHA and faculty of the University of Leeds has high hopes for the project. “We believe this to be the next generation diagnostic testing. We can now detect almost any analyte faster, cheaper and more easily than the current accepted testing methodology.”

The biosensor will be easy to use and quite versatile. Dr. Millner compares the device to a standard glucose biosensor used by diabetics in terms of functionality.  The Leeds group also sees the device utilized for other advanced testing such as for HIV or tuberculosis, and non-medical sensing purposes like checking for pollutants in water or antibodies in milk.

Though still requiring moving components and not quite as speedy, it seems like the first steps towards a staple of science fiction, the versatile tricorder, are being made in earnest.


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Watch out Star Trek
By Bateluer on 10/2/2008 9:01:04 AM , Rating: 2
Humans just invented the Tricorder Mark 1. Time to come up with new ideas.




RE: Watch out Star Trek
By Spivonious on 10/2/2008 9:05:50 AM , Rating: 2
Give me a warp drive and I'll be happy.


RE: Watch out Star Trek
By rdeegvainl on 10/2/2008 11:11:34 AM , Rating: 5
I'd rather have a replicator and a holo deck


RE: Watch out Star Trek
By DeepBlue1975 on 10/2/2008 3:27:53 PM , Rating: 5
I'd rather have seven of nine.


RE: Watch out Star Trek
By Agent 86 on 10/2/2008 5:28:55 PM , Rating: 3
I wonder what the RIAA would have to say about that...


RE: Watch out Star Trek
By Bender 123 on 10/2/2008 8:25:52 PM , Rating: 4
You would need to purchase one hologram for your holodeck and then buy a seperate copy for your holophone and one extra to enjoy on your holoputer...If you copied it from one to the other, it would holostealing.


RE: Watch out Star Trek
By foolsgambit11 on 10/3/2008 12:50:08 PM , Rating: 2
The Unicorder?


and why is this unfortunate?
By Seemonkeyscanfly on 10/2/2008 9:41:56 AM , Rating: 1
"Unfortunately, the tests require urine or blood samples, skilled technicians and several hours to complete."

Yea, because Spock and Bones were not skilled technicians.....




RE: and why is this unfortunate?
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 10/2/2008 9:45:26 AM , Rating: 2
It's referring to the old test, not the new hand held one


RE: and why is this unfortunate?
By Seemonkeyscanfly on 10/2/2008 9:54:17 AM , Rating: 1
OK, that last line did not sink in the first time I read it. However, Spock and Bones were still skilled technician. I guess my point is, will always need some level of skilled technician. Still it is a good advancement.


RE: and why is this unfortunate?
By omnicronx on 10/2/2008 10:14:45 AM , Rating: 2
You do know Star Trek is not real life right?


By Seemonkeyscanfly on 10/2/2008 10:28:22 AM , Rating: 4
What? do not say such things. Your confusing Galaxy quest with Star Trek. :)


RE: and why is this unfortunate?
By Bender 123 on 10/2/2008 8:27:50 PM , Rating: 2
Check the amount of info on Wikipedia vs American government and its clear there are a lot of people that cant tell the difference...


How about this?
By FITCamaro on 10/2/2008 8:39:15 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
The Leeds group also sees the device utilized for other advanced testing such as for HIV or tuberculosis, and non-medical sensing purposes like checking for pollutants in water or antibodies in milk .


How about melanine?




RE: How about this?
By InvertMe on 10/2/2008 11:21:10 AM , Rating: 3
Just don't buy your milk (or any food products) from China and that won't be a concern.


RE: How about this?
By geddarkstorm on 10/2/2008 12:22:05 PM , Rating: 2
This thing sounds like a miniaturized version of a plasmon resonance machine. If you can grow antibodies against melamine, then you can detect it. May even work for air born particle detection too - so many uses it's great.


Spellcheck strikes again... :)
By PedroDaGr8 on 10/3/2008 12:38:32 PM , Rating: 3
Umm the last letter in ELISA stands for ASSAY not ESSAY.

One is the assessment of components of a mixture or other unknown.

The latter is something you write in english class.




There already is a tricorder
By rossmcdonald on 10/2/2008 4:33:09 PM , Rating: 2
Check out the Bioveris instrument.




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