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  (Source: HP)
Intel ultrabooks won't come with discrete graphics, you'll have to pay extra for that

Hewlett-Packard Comp. (HPQ) is the world's largest seller of personal computers and hence a key battleground for processor makers Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) and Intel Corp. (INTC).

Both companies' latest and greatest chip are on parade in a trio of new ultrathin lines unveiled by HP, a refresh to the company's "Envy" ultramobile brand.  Interestingly, the Ivy Bridge (Intel) and Trinity (AMD) notebooks have the same battery life rating from HP -- 9 hours (though of course real-world testing is likely to reveal a winner and a loser).

The AMD designs are substantially cheaper than the Ivy Bridge ones.  HP's most affordable "Sleekbook" line will first launch with higher priced Intel designs, but in June will be expanded to include less costly models powered by AMD's new Trinity accelerated processing unit (APU), which features "discrete quality" on-die graphics.

The SleekBook models are as follows:

HP Envy SleekBook (14-inches): May 9 launch
Price: $699 (Sandy Bridge) ~$799 (Ivy Bridge)
Weight: 4 lb
Thickness: ~19.8 mm
Screen: 14-inch 1366x768 pixel
Memory: 4 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Storage: 500 GB HDD
Connectivity: 802.11a/g/n, gigabit ethernet
Ports: HDMI, USB 3.0 x2, USB 2.0 x1, SD card reader
Extras: Beats Audio

(Note: This isn't an ultrabook, as it doesn't meet Intel's official spec, which requies an SSD or NAND cache.)

HP Envy SleekBook (15.6-inches): June 20 launch
Price: $599
CPU: AMD Trinity APU
Weight: 4 lb
Thickness: ~19.8 mm
Screen: 15.6-inch 1366x768 pixel
Memory: 4 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Storage: 320 GB HDD
Connectivity: 802.11a/g/n, gigabit ethernet
Ports: HDMI, USB 3.0 x2, USB 2.0 x1, SD card reader
Extras: Beats Audio

The actual ultrabooks from HP will come in two flavors -- the Envy Ultrabook, the mid-range model, and the Envy Spectre XT Ultrabook, the flagship model.

These designs are as follows:

HP Envy Ultrabook (14-inches): May 9 launch
Price: $749 (Sandy Bridge) ~$849 (Ivy Bridge)
Weight: 4 lb
Thickness: ~19.8 mm
Screen: 14-inch 1366x768 pixel
Memory: 4 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Storage: 500 GB HDD + 32 GB NAND cache
Connectivity: 802.11a/g/n, gigabit ethernet
Ports: HDMI, USB 3.0 x2, USB 2.0 x1, SD card reader
Extras: Beats Audio

HP Envy Ultrabook (15.6-inches): May 9 launch
Price: $799 (Sandy Bridge) ~$899 (Ivy Bridge)
Weight: 4 lb
Thickness: ~19.8 mm
Screen: 14-inch 1366x768 pixel
Memory: 4 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Storage: 500 GB HDD + 32 GB NAND cache
Connectivity: 802.11a/g/n, gigabit ethernet
Ports: HDMI, USB 3.0 x2, USB 2.0 x1, SD card reader
Extras: Beats Audio
HP Ultrabook
HP Envy Spectre XT (13.3-inches): June 8 launch
Price: $999
CPU: Ivy Bridge (third generation Core i-Series processor) 
Weight: 3 lb
Thickness: 14.5 mm
Screen: 13.3-inch 1366x768 pixel
Memory: 4 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Storage: 128 GB SSD
Connectivity: 802.11a/g/n, gigabit ethernet, 2x2 WLAN, Bluetooth 3.0
Ports: HDMI, USB 3.0 x1, HDMI
Extras: Beats Audio, Adobe System Inc.'s (ADBE) Photoshop (full), and Symantec Corp.'s (SYMC) Norton Internet Security (full)

Spectre XT black

The body designs for all the models are relatively similar with sleek brushed metal (black or silver available) cases colored in black or silver hues.  The Ivy Bridge models do not come with discrete graphics by default, but customers can pay extra to get a discrete GPU.  Larger hard drives or more memory are among the other customization options consumers can pony up extra cash for.

Ultimately, the AMD vs. Intel Ivy Bridge thin notebooks are shaping up to be much as what thought -- the Intel will be slightly thinner and lighter, but will be well over $1,000 USD with discrete graphics added.  By contrast, an AMD Sleekbook with matching performance (other than the slower HDD) will start at ~$600.  Build quality (packaging) will be almost identical for both competing designs, other than size and weight.

DailyTech's poll indicated that the majority of people would prefer an AMD ultrathin to an Intel one (the vote was nearly 2-to-1 with over 3,500 votes cast), given the price and graphics difference, assuming battery life and build quality were the same.  Of course the majority will have to wait a month to get their wish, while the vocal enthusiast minority can get their Ivy Bridge Ultrabook dream machine today.

HP's new ultrathins and similar ilk from rivals all closely parrot Apple Inc.'s (AAPL) iconic MacBook Air design, which was arguably the first true metal body-encased ultrathin.  When the Air launched in 2008 many mocked its lack of an internal optical media drive and predicted weak sales.  After Apple wowed with MacBook Air sales, the tune quickly changed, as evidenced by the fact that the Envy Sleekbooks, Envy Ultrabooks, and Envy Spectre XT carry nary an internal optical media drive.

Sources: HP [Press Release], [Spectre XT Product Page]



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IPS HD
By Breathless on 5/9/2012 10:56:19 AM , Rating: 4
OR GET OUT




RE: IPS HD
By EasyC on 5/9/2012 11:04:42 AM , Rating: 5
Amen. Any laptop costing more than 400$ should have a full HD screen. No more of ths 1366x768 crap.


RE: IPS HD
By icrf on 5/9/2012 11:05:06 AM , Rating: 5
"Screen: 15.6-inch 1366x768 pixel"

I think I just threw up in my mouth a little.


RE: IPS HD
By BioHazardous on 5/9/2012 11:12:15 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think I just threw up in my mouth a little.

Hah, Dodgeball.

Movie quotes aside, I agree, these 1366x768 resolutions need to go away.


RE: IPS HD
By cknobman on 5/9/2012 1:58:30 PM , Rating: 2
1366x768 screens??

They're about as useful as a poopie flavored lollipop!!!


RE: IPS HD
By BioHazardous on 5/9/2012 2:38:17 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
They're about as useful as a poopie flavored lollipop!


You had me at blood and semen.


RE: IPS HD
By Reclaimer77 on 5/9/12, Rating: -1
RE: IPS HD
By Denigrate on 5/9/2012 11:16:31 AM , Rating: 4
1366x768 is terrible, and barely adequate for a 10" screen 1440 X 900 should be the minimum for anything larger, with any decent laptop coming in at 1680 X 1050.


RE: IPS HD
By Solandri on 5/9/2012 3:42:15 PM , Rating: 3
1024x768 was the standard desktop resolution about 15 years ago. It's painful to think that with all the advances in computer graphics in 15 years, the "standard" screen resolution in laptop manufacturers' eyes has only increased 33% in the horizontal and remained unchanged in the vertical.

I partly blame Microsoft though. Until Windows 7, Windows did a poor job scaling icons, windows, and text for different dpi. A common complaint I got when buying laptops for older people was that the icons and text were too small. Under Windows XP, 1366x768 on a 14" or 15.6" screen had a comfortable text and icon size for older people. Going to a higher resolution screen was actually a disadvantage for them.

The scaling has (finally) been fixed in Windows 7, but the manufacturers now have it ingrained in their heads that going higher than 1366x768 will result in complaints from their older customers.


RE: IPS HD
By Reclaimer77 on 5/9/12, Rating: -1
RE: IPS HD
By The0ne on 5/9/12, Rating: -1
RE: IPS HD
By Reclaimer77 on 5/9/2012 5:37:25 PM , Rating: 3
I'm playing devils advocate, I'm not "saying" ain't broke, don't fix.

I'm saying while WE might feel certain aspects are utterly crucial, the market at-large might not be reflecting that in actual buying trends.

Look how long it took for LCD TV's to become mainstream. Or how long it took for HD to truly saturate. Sometimes the market doesn't move as quickly as we would like. The simple fact is the vast majority of laptops have what we would consider to be an "inferior" screen.


RE: IPS HD
By rubbahbandman on 5/9/2012 4:47:56 PM , Rating: 2
In the past I may have shared your sentiment, but I think sales of "the new ipad" deflate your argument (in case you're wondering, I'm only comparing the two because some ipad models share a similar price point).

The most interesting thing is that an ipad is no where near as powerful or as functional as an ultrabook, but clearly the general consumer could care less. I would even go as far as to say that the majority of ultrabook sales will be made up by businesses, but I could be wrong there.

What do you want to bet Apple's goal is to put retina displays on their new macbooks regardless of the additional cost? You better believe they will sell like crazy even if they cost the consumer twice as much and offer no other advantage to your average ultrabook.

I would say the main distinguishing factor of Apple products (other than costing more) is they have significantly higher quality displays than the competition and to me that's been their edge.


RE: IPS HD
By Gondor on 5/9/2012 5:34:18 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
You better believe they will sell like crazy even if they cost the consumer twice as much and offer no other advantage to your average ultrabook.


This statement is a tautology because Apple drones will purchase anything, retina display or not, even if it comes with the poop-flavored lollypop mentioned above.

It has nothing to do with technical details (such as employing higher resolution screen versus a lower resoltuion one).


RE: IPS HD
By Reclaimer77 on 5/9/2012 5:45:18 PM , Rating: 2
The old iPad had a pretty bad DPI and was a CRUSHING sales leader and touted as the greatest thing ever by Apple fans and others.

To put things in perspective, my $200 Kindle Fire has a higher pixel density than the iPad 2. So yeah, the 10" iPad2 was REALLY bad on that front, but did it even matter? Nope.

So I'm not sure your example is all that relevant. Regardless of specs, Apple moves products on the scale that most companies only dream of. They also have almost unmatched buying power and supply chains. So while they could easily put a Retina display in a MacBook regardless of costs, doesn't mean everyone can.

And again, I wasn't putting forth a "sentiment". I was trying to be moderate and looking at this from a different angle. But my mistake.


RE: IPS HD
By corduroygt on 5/9/2012 11:27:57 AM , Rating: 3
You sit much closer to a laptop screen compared to a desktop monitor. Have you EVER used a 15.6" 1080p laptop? I have and it's glorious and not too small at all.


RE: IPS HD
By Novaguy on 5/9/2012 11:56:52 AM , Rating: 2
Getting 1080p at 15.6 was probably the best upgrade I got for my current Llano dv6; the 6750m video card upgrade probably was overkill.

The 1080p upgrade usually costs about $150 from HP in the dv6 line, so hopefully they'll keep it for this line. Perhaps they will even allow the occasional 30/35% coupon get used as well, putting the upgrade around $100. Still a bit of a sticker shock, but I'll do it again.

If ssd prices drop, a nice device might be a 35W Trinity with the 1080p and an aftermark 120gb ssd.


RE: IPS HD
By retrospooty on 5/9/2012 12:48:00 PM , Rating: 3
"The 1080p upgrade usually costs about $150 from HP"

Yup... This is what drives me nuts abouot alot of recently released laptops... Most dont have the optional high res screens. IT used to be most laptops would have a crappy 1366x768 and $50 would get you 1600x900 and $100 would get you 1920x1080... Lately alot of model just have 1366x768 and that's all. I would gladly pay the extra cash for higher res.


RE: IPS HD
By Novaguy on 5/9/2012 4:23:23 PM , Rating: 2
Just tried pricing out an Envy sleekbook; obviously intel versions are only available at this point.

They do have an upgrade to a 120 gb SSD ($150 upgrade over a 500gb 5400 rpm drive), so maybe worth it when factoring a labor and warranty and such; possibly a good idea if any of those coupons hit. i5 sandy bridge chips only, but there is a potential $50 upgrade for the 7670M if you don't want the hd3000.

However, there was no option for a 1080p screen yet, not sure if it ever will happen. But they did have a monitor selection page, it just had the 768 screen on it. Maybe it'll be avaialable in the future, maybe never.


RE: IPS HD
By retrospooty on 5/9/2012 12:16:32 PM , Rating: 2
"You guys want 15" laptops to rock full 1080p lol."

Yes, I am on a Dell Lat E6520 with a 15 inch 1080p now (my work laptop) and it rocks. 1080p may be overkill on a 15 inch, but at least get 1600x900 FFS. 1366x768 needs to diw on anything larger than 10 inches. Its just freegin unuseable.


RE: IPS HD
By twhittet on 5/9/2012 2:36:18 PM , Rating: 2
Also on a 6520 with 1080p - love it. It's the only way I can get any work done without having it hooked up to an external monitor. Even at 1080 I am annoyed occasionally - my main monitor is 1920x1200, and when I get to 1080 I still can't fit everything.
768 is barely fine for play. 1080 vertical is very necessary for work.


RE: IPS HD
By Solandri on 5/9/2012 3:46:56 PM , Rating: 2
My laptop is 1600x900, while my desktop is 1920x1200. 1600x900 is good (much better than 1366x768), but I still have to flip back and forth between windows to get work done.

To really work comfortably with two windows open side-by-side, you need 1920x1200 (or 1920x1080). I'm making do with hooking up an external monitor for extra space, but a full 1080p display is going to be a high priority on my next laptop.


RE: IPS HD
By Calin on 5/10/2012 2:25:12 AM , Rating: 2
I've bought a Dell 15.4 laptop, with something like Athlon 4400 (dual core) with WinXP - I don't know exactly when was that, but some four to four and a half years ago. Bottom of the bin laptop, but it had 1280 by 800 display, and the resolution and dpi was about OK. However, I _HAD_ to move the taskbar to the left (instead of down) to have enough vertical space.
This problem (vertical space) would be much more painful on a 768 pixel width display, especially as Win7 has a bigger taskbar


RE: IPS HD
By Camikazi on 5/9/2012 1:27:04 PM , Rating: 2
My laptop has a 15.4 inch screen with 1680x1050 resolution, it looks awesome.


RE: IPS HD
By piroroadkill on 5/9/2012 5:41:23 PM , Rating: 1
Heheh, I have two 15" laptops with 1920x1200.


RE: IPS HD
By nafhan on 5/9/2012 11:21:31 AM , Rating: 2
I'm fine with the resolution... I'm just sick of 15.6" notebooks. A 13" at 1366 x 768 is fine with me. Seriously, what's the point of all these new low power CPU's if we're just sticking them in huge laptops?

The worst though was HP and others sticking Brazos in 15 inchers. WTF?!?


RE: IPS HD
By morgan12x on 5/9/2012 11:34:42 AM , Rating: 2
I personally like a 17" laptop. But that aside I hate how all these great ultrabooks have glossy screens. I would pay extra if they would offer a matte screen option. Hear that HP? Dell? Lenovo?


RE: IPS HD
By Reclaimer77 on 5/9/2012 11:44:32 AM , Rating: 2
Matte has really fallen by the wayside, and I'm not sure why. Tablets with glossy screens are just HORRIBLE in sunlight, or any other light really. You would think that at least those would have the option for a matte screen, but nope.


RE: IPS HD
By Lonyo on 5/9/2012 12:26:15 PM , Rating: 2
Because glossy helps make up for the shit TN panels they throw in them making them look nice in the store and encouraging people to be fooled into buying them.


RE: IPS HD
By dubldwn on 5/9/2012 1:14:26 PM , Rating: 2
I suppose that's true. Kind of ironic finding a matte laptop is tough, which could be outdoors or in unusual lighting, but finding a glossy IPS desktop monitor is impossible. I'm one of those weirdos who likes glossy displays - there should be more choices.


RE: IPS HD
By Belard on 5/9/2012 4:37:27 PM , Rating: 2
Its not hard. Go to Lenovo's website and order a ThinkPad from the T, L, X or W line. They also have high res options.


RE: IPS HD
By nafhan on 5/9/2012 1:40:41 PM , Rating: 2
Smaller the better for me. My ideal desktop replacement is a 13" with an external monitor and full size keyboard/mouse. I don't want to be carrying a 17"... to each his own, though.


RE: IPS HD
By Flunk on 5/9/2012 2:04:52 PM , Rating: 2
Enjoy your boat anchor.


RE: IPS HD
By lennylim on 5/9/2012 2:47:30 PM , Rating: 2
I had to look really hard to get a matte screen for my Lenovo. Both the T and the Edge E series have matte screens, possibly others.


RE: IPS HD
By aliasfox on 5/9/2012 4:31:13 PM , Rating: 2
It's not just resolution, but color/contrast. My ex had an entry level 14" HP, perfectly fine for basic use, with the exception of that horrid screen. HP put the absolute worst low contrast TN display in there that washed out even if you were cheek to cheek with the person who was dead center. Even dead center, the screen's contrast was worse than the 15", decade old panel I have lying around as a backup screen. Heck, aside from brightness, it's worse than the near-decade old 12" PowerBook I have sitting in the corner - and the screen on that laptop wasn't known for being good even in 2003. I'd be surprised if someone told me that the contrast ratio on that HP was greater than 100:1.

It doesn't get any better when you turn up the brightness to usable levels - you just end up looking at a sickly pale off-white that represents white and a mid-grey to represent black, with all other colors crammed in between - makes the image on an iPhone Instagram picture look like it's a high quality, accurate, saturated image.

It doesn't need to be IPS, it doesn't need to be full HD - heck, you don't even need to put a MacBook Air level TN display in there (which is sadly the benchmark in the ultraportable realm). But for the love of everyone's vision, put in a display that isn't an embarrassment.


RE: IPS HD
By StanO360 on 5/15/2012 5:20:38 PM , Rating: 2
They could offer a hi-res option for $100 more and 10% (Maybe) would buy it. Just not a high value in a budget laptop.


Won't be buying w/ such poor resolution.
By Candide08 on 5/9/2012 11:50:11 AM , Rating: 2
iPad has 2048 x 1536. Mac books have great resolution.

1366 x 768?? Major fail.




RE: Won't be buying w/ such poor resolution.
By Apone on 5/9/2012 12:16:00 PM , Rating: 2
- Well that's great but ultra-high resolution monitors have been around for years before the iPad. Interesting how Apple fans don't consider it important until Apple says so (since you just referenced the 2048 x 1536 iPad resolution).

- Macbooks have great resolution? Let's see, it's 1366 x 768 for the 11-inch MB Air, 1440 x 900 for the 13-inch MB Air, 1440 x 900 default res for the 15" Macbook Pro (1680 x 1050 is $100 more). You can't even get WUXGA 1920 x 1080 res unless you drop $2499 (base price) for the bulky 17-inch MB Pro. My 15.6" Dell XPS 15 has 1920 x 1080 res and it only cost me $850.

1366 x 768 - I agree, major fail
1440 x 900 - slightly less fail
1680 x 1050 - Meh
1920 x 1080 - Bada$$!


RE: Won't be buying w/ such poor resolution.
By Taft12 on 5/9/2012 3:40:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
ultra-high resolution monitors have been around for years before the iPad. Interesting how Apple fans don't consider it important until Apple says so (since you just referenced the 2048 x 1536 iPad resolution).


Look, I'm no Apple fan, but they've offered "Cinema Display" monitors in higher-than-standard resolutions for over a decade.

Pushing high display resolutions is one of their most important contributions to the industry AFAIC (while HP and the like are trying to drag us down to save costs)

Keep your Apple-bashing grounded in reality, there's plenty of opportunity for that.


By Apone on 5/9/2012 5:12:55 PM , Rating: 2
@ Taft12

- Please do your homework, you'll see my "bashing" is nothing but facts pulled directly from Apple's store site on my previous post.

- Explain to me exactly what "Cinema Display" is on an Apple monitor? What value-added technological benefit(s) does Cinema Display have? And please no Wikipedia references, everyone knows that's not reliable.

- Just to give you some perspective, my first Dell notebook was a 2001 Dell Inspiron 8100. It had a gorgeous 15-inch 1600 x 1200 resolution WUXGA display; can you tell me what commercially available reasonably-priced Apple notebook even remotely came close to having that kind of LCD precision by Apple back in the late 90's/early 2000's?


By Cheesew1z69 on 5/9/2012 7:03:15 PM , Rating: 2
http://support.apple.com/kb/SP79

Not that much different than any others? Seems not...


By mikeyD95125 on 5/9/2012 9:55:03 PM , Rating: 3
I think they do. More importantly, they are pretty much the only new laptops you can buy with 16:10 displays. I got my Dell 17 inch in 1900x1200 in 2009 right before they switched to the 16:9 displays.

If the manufacturers don't start offering better displays in the next couple years ill just have to replace my laptop with a MBP and run boot camp.

16:9...ANNOYING


By Trisped on 5/9/2012 2:40:12 PM , Rating: 2
Screen size on Windows PCs is limited due to poor support for scaling. I expect Windows 8 (with the major focus on Metro enabled software) will better support resolution scaling, so you a 15" 3840 x 2160 display will actually be readable.

Before someone makes this into an Apple vs Windows thing, Windows Vista and 7 also support display scaling, but not all legacy software deal with it correctly.


Buy the AMD....buy the AMD...buy the AMD...
By Reclaimer77 on 5/9/2012 11:31:44 AM , Rating: 2
Why do I get the feeling there's a narrative here that is less about providing me with the facts, and more about skewing them in AMD's favor? I feel like I'm being brainwashed into buying the AMD. The bit about Daily Tech's internal polling data favoring the AMD...lol, wow okay. That's good to know I guess?




By JasonMick (blog) on 5/9/2012 11:48:59 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why do I get the feeling there's a narrative here that is less about providing me with the facts, and more about skewing them in AMD's favor? I feel like I'm being brainwashed into buying the AMD. The bit about Daily Tech's internal polling data favoring the AMD...lol, wow okay. That's good to know I guess?
Not me... the readers.

If I were picking I would buy the Intel Ivy Bridge with discrete graphics.

However, I'm not a budget shopper -- I'm willing to pay extra for slimmer, lighter designs, with extra computing power and discrete graphics, as I game, program, and program games on my laptops and am oft on the go.

Both of my last two laptops have been Intels -- I'm typing this on a Sandy Bridge MSI gaming machine (and no, I don't own AMD or Intel stock).

That said, I can see why the MAJORITY of readers feel the way they do. IF I was to go the budget route for a non-gaming route, I would definitely consider the AMD designs as they're much cheaper and feature the exact same build quality, though obviously featuring inferior processor power (though this hardly matters for the average everyday internet/photoshop/etc. use scenarios).


RE: Buy the AMD....buy the AMD...buy the AMD...
By Trisped on 5/9/2012 12:18:59 PM , Rating: 3
The poll was a little miss leading, it was not "would you buy an Intel or an AMD ultralight?" Instead it was a "would you buy a $1000 Intel or a $500 AMD ultralight?"

I think the survey shows that people want cheaper ultralights, not that people want AMD processors more then Intel.


By Targon on 5/16/2012 4:14:03 PM , Rating: 2
I agree with you here. There are different price points, and in that $600 and under range, the AMD based laptops provide a decent purchase for most users. If I were to go for a higher end laptop, then Intel plus discrete graphics would be the best bet.

So, what are most people looking to buy these days? The economy is tough, and spending $600 is far more attractive for most than $1000.


Larger disk size for Intel
By ET on 5/9/2012 11:20:45 AM , Rating: 2
Makes the price comparison a little more difficult. I wonder how much the AMD laptops will cost after a disk upgrade (and I'm sure the SSD cache option won't be there).




RE: Larger disk size for Intel
By Iketh on 5/9/2012 8:27:58 PM , Rating: 1
LOL the disk size? Gigabytes cost ~$0.10 in a 2.5" hard drive. You should know about the subject before talking about it.


RE: Larger disk size for Intel
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/9/2012 8:53:03 PM , Rating: 2
SSD do not cost that...talking about knowing your subject eh?


RE: Larger disk size for Intel
By Iketh on 5/14/2012 4:29:28 PM , Rating: 2
He's talking about 320GB vs 500GB hard drives... and I get rated down because someone thought your post was relevant.


Can you explain how you came up with title?
By ilt24 on 5/9/2012 11:12:38 AM , Rating: 2
You choose the least expensive price for an AMD based systems and the most expensive price for an Intel based system. Do you think that comparison is useful?




RE: Can you explain how you came up with title?
By xti on 5/9/2012 11:32:22 AM , Rating: 2
it clearly states ultra book...and only the more expensive intels qualify as one...


By ilt24 on 5/9/2012 2:41:55 PM , Rating: 2
from the HP press release:

* The HP ENVY SpectreXT is an ultramobile premium Ultrabook that delivers an overall premium experience with extraordinary design and performance.

*Offering both style and substance, HP ENVY Sleekbooks and HP ENVY Ultrabook systems provide the ultimate entertainment experience in 14-inch and 15.6-inch diagonal display options.


$100 extra?
By bug77 on 5/9/2012 2:23:57 PM , Rating: 2
Why is Ivy Bridge $100 more expensive than Sandy Bridge? Afaik, Ivy Bridge was launched at roughly the same price point as its predecessor.




RE: $100 extra?
By Solandri on 5/9/2012 4:13:31 PM , Rating: 2
You're thinking of it backwards. Sandy Bridge is on its way out, so it's $100 cheaper than when it was introduced. Which happens to be $100 cheaper than Ivy Bridge.


only 15.6 for AMD
By sweatshopking on 5/9/2012 10:57:44 AM , Rating: 3
that's a bummer, wtf. i want a 13 inch trinity~!




Crap displays
By tayb on 5/9/2012 11:00:52 AM , Rating: 2
No thanks HP. 1366x768? Not acceptable above 11".




don't need discrete on a laptop
By Hector2 on 5/9/2012 12:54:38 PM , Rating: 2
Don't need discrete graphics on a laptop. The Ivy Bridge plus improved embedded graphics will more than suit my needs - and an extra $50 for an SSD instead of an HDD is worth it.

For serious gaming, I'm sticking to my DIY Gulftown i7-990x desktop with an added graphics card.




Attack of the clones
By Tony Swash on 5/9/12, Rating: -1
RE: Attack of the clones
By Decom on 5/9/2012 2:10:35 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
by Tony Swash on May 9, 2012 at 1:11 PM It's only taken them four years to clone the MacBook Air. Soon HP will be ready to release an iPod killer. Apple must be very worried.


Tony clearly you have missed the link in the second paragraph "Envy Ultramobile Brand" which links to a Blog on DT from June 2008, so your 4 year comment it total BS as usual.

I i know I'm doing BSmonitors's job here but hey.......


RE: Attack of the clones
By Tony Swash on 5/9/2012 2:50:14 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Tony clearly you have missed the link in the second paragraph "Envy Ultramobile Brand" which links to a Blog on DT from June 2008, so your 4 year comment it total BS as usual.


The Envy Ultramobile Brand from 2008 looks nothing like a MacBook Air.

The HP Envy SleekBook looks exactly like a MacBook Air.

Ummm - what happened between those two dates............


RE: Attack of the clones
By Solandri on 5/9/2012 4:02:29 PM , Rating: 4
The ultraslim form factor far, far predates the Macbook Air. Here's the laptop I was using in 2000:
http://www.lenzg.net/portege3440CT/

Sharp came out with a similar one in 2001:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2001/09/11/sharp_unsh...

Sony's X505 from 2004 was probably the ultimate:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/06/11/review_vai...

NEC had one as well, but this site limits me to three links. And they did this in the days before SSDs, and before the modern ultra-thin LED displays. And unlike the MBA, they kept a full complement of ports.

This is starting to get repetitive, but: Just because the first time you saw something was on an Apple product, doesn't mean Apple invented it. And neither does it mean other companies are copying Apple. And neither does it mean the Apple version is the best.


RE: Attack of the clones
By chris2618 on 5/9/2012 2:06:27 PM , Rating: 2
Its does seem a bit of pattern. Apple releases a produce not really fit for purpose get the fashionistas to buy them. Then a few years down the line other product released similar due to the technology being ready then claim they had the idea first.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Trisped on 5/9/2012 2:57:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's only taken them four years to clone the MacBook Air.

Soon HP will be ready to release an iPod killer.

Apple must be very worried.

And Apple cloned the Sony Viao ultra portable of the time (though they switched from the "looks like metal" plastic used by Sony to the brushed aluminum. A simple change for a company who already had aluminum cases. You do have a point though, that Apple was the first large company to sell laptops with all metal cases to consumers. There were a few smaller brands offering ruggedized laptops to students with solid metal cases and defense sector has always had laptops with solid metal cases (though at one point they were just computers in a steel briefcase.

Apple already released the iPod killer, it is called the iPhone.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Tony Swash on 5/9/2012 3:40:03 PM , Rating: 1
Even Jason thinks the HP offering is a MacBook Air look a like - hence the pun in the article's title.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/9/2012 4:41:32 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
HP Airs $599 AMD Trinity Sleekbook, $999 Intel Ivy Bridge Ultrabook
What pun? I am missing it...

Also, if you think they look anything alike, get your eyes checked.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Tony Swash on 5/9/12, Rating: 0
RE: Attack of the clones
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/9/2012 6:52:15 PM , Rating: 2
Again, you douche, they look nothing alike. Get your eyes checked.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/9/2012 7:05:28 PM , Rating: 2
I meant iDouche...sorry.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Tony Swash on 5/10/2012 6:50:32 AM , Rating: 2
Given Apple's track record of introducing new product design motifs that are stunningly successful in the market place it is not surprising that OEMs copy and follow Apple's design moves so slavishly. However Apple's design influence goes deeper than that, because Apple's designs are so powerful that they become hegemonic, their designs reshape the fabric of the aesthetic of the market place and soon it's hard to conceive of products that are not designed within the paradigm Apple has created. And of course Apple's design aesthetic leeches far beyond computers, phones and tablets, not just to the whole vast iDevice ecosystem but beyond the tech sector entirely. This tendency first became apparent with the release of the original Bondi Blue iMac back in 1998 when within a few months staplers, coffee machines, pencil sharpeners and office equipment of all kinds was popping up all made using the same semi translucent Bondi Blue plastic. Nowadays with Apple the dominant tech company the influence of Apple design is simply unavoidable and it saturates the world of made objects, above all in the tech sector.

I don't blame HP for copying the MacBook Air but I do laugh at their crassness.

And at those who, through a weird form of rigorous and self inflicted visually impairment, try to pretend that Apple design doesn't matter. It's like watching someone who insists on wearing dark glasses stumbling about in a dark house bumping into the furniture.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/10/2012 8:23:00 AM , Rating: 2
Apple doesn't matter to me...and to a lot of people. They are just a company, not a religion. But to some they are, and you are the cult leader.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Tony Swash on 5/10/2012 1:00:55 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Apple doesn't matter to me...


I guess that's why you are always popping up to make a comment in Apple related threads ;)


RE: Attack of the clones
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/10/2012 1:19:18 PM , Rating: 1
Because of the bullshit they are doing by potentially getting competitors banned over ridiculous lawsuits? You really are brain dead aren't you? I think so....

Oh, by the way, how is your buddy Florian? How is that Oracle pay he is getting? How much does does Apple pay you to shill?


RE: Attack of the clones
By Solandri on 5/10/2012 6:04:24 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
A group of HP designers sit down in a dark room and say "let's design a new laptop..."
And it looked just like the laptop that had been gutting HP's sales for years

But it was just a coincidence!

Most of HP's laptops are designed and manufactured by Quanta. Quanta also designs and builds the Macbooks, including the Air.

It's tough to say how much of the Air's design originated at Apple vs. Quanta. And likewise whether it was HP which told Quanta they wanted something Air-like, or if it was Quanta which came up with on their own when HP requested an Intel Ultrabook. All the name-brand companies are very tight-lipped about their relationship with the ODMs. But the success of Asus (they used to be an ODM) points to the ODMs doing most if not all of the design work.

So it's most likely that the Macbook Air is actually the Quanta Air, and the HP Spectre is the Quanta Spectre. No surprised that they look (somewhat) alike.


RE: Attack of the clones
By Trisped on 5/9/2012 4:57:46 PM , Rating: 3
Hmm, seems you missed the point.

HP has a design which is similar to Apples (a fashionable design http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fashionable). As such it can be suggested that HP copied Apple (which is what your original post indicates).

When Apple first released the MacBook Air is used a design which was similar to Sony's ultra portables (a fashionable design). As such it can be suggested that Apple copied Sony.


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