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  (Source: Vice/Arikia Millikan)
James Deen and Andy San Dimas used Google glasses to shoot a unique brand of experiential porn

They say that size doesn't matter; it's what you do with it that really counts.

I. Adult Developers Eye Google's High-Tech Package

That's not always true, but it appears to be the case when it comes to Google Inc.'s (GOOGmuch buzzed about wearable electronics prototype, Glass Explorer edition. The device has been titillating gadget fans, futurists -- and even adult entertainment "experts" -- since its launch to developers in June 2012.

The prototype weighs a mere 50 grams and consists of a sweeping titanium arc crowned with two plastic adornments on its right side.  The rear plastic extrusion has a bone conductive speaker that pipes the device's audio directly into your skull, and carries the device's 2.1 Wh battery.  The front extrusion carries a roughly 1 inch transparent "prism" display, which operates at around 640x360 (or "the equivalent of a 25 inch high definition screen from eight feet away", according to Google).  

Google Glasses
[Image Source: Google/AP]

The rest of the hardware spec is minimalist -- 16 GB of NAND flash, 682 MB of DRAM; an OMAP 4 dual-core (1.2 GHz OMAP 4430; ARMv7) SoC from Texas Instruments, Inc. (TXN); 802.11 b/g; Bluetooth; and most critically, a 5 megapixel camera capable of shooting 720p video of the field of view.

The software is very much a work in process.  The device runs a build of Android 4.0.4 ("Ice Cream Sandwich") that has been tweaked to display information in "card" format.  Google has released two firmware updates XE5 and XE6, the latter of which closed a gaping hole in the device's security.  The XE6 update also introduced a voice-driven browser of sorts in that handles URLs that turn up in the search.  

The latter opened a fresh gateway to adult entertainment for users willing to bear with Google's frustratingly finicky XE voice search.

II. Glass and Tits Site Carries on in the Wake of App Ban

But Glass fans weren't willing to stop there.  "Dr. Cocktor", a pseudonymous engineer, was an early adopter of the devices, which he decided would be a perfect way to extend his company MiKandi's Android reach.  The developer got down to work to the hard task of developing a feature Glass app.  Jen McEwen -- MiKandi's cofounder estimates that it took around 1,000 lines of code just to display the iconic phrase "hello world" to the glasses.

But the MiKandi team was boosted by their depth of experience with Android products.  MiKandi had previously built a name for itself as the world's largest third party app and content marketplace for Android devoted to adult entertainment.  Founded in 2010 by Jen McEwen and Jesse Adams, the app store wooed adult app developers who were displaced when Apple, Inc. (AAPLbanned adult apps from its (DRM locked) i-devices in 2010.  

The store was a target of rage from late Apple CEO and cofounder Steven P. Jobs who took issue with MiKandi's use of the term "app store" and threatened to sue.  But despite Mr. Jobs' best efforts to offer the public "freedom from porn", MiKandi is today flourishing, crammed with 8,000 mature-themed apps and frequented by an estimated 4 million Android users.

In late May Dr. Cocktor and his cohorts took the covers off "Tits and Glass", the first pornographic content app for Glass Explorer.  The app drew a great deal of excitement when it first spurted out onto the market. But before it could achieve full penetration, Google spanked it into submission, prohibiting "Glassware content that contains nudity, graphic sex acts, or sexually explicit material" in a Terms of Service update.

Tits_and_Glass

After the ban, MiKandi sprung back into action looking to test the limits of how hard Google's censorship stance was.  Jesse Adams states, "They didn’t go as far to say what the user could do, but they said that the developer could not push pornographic content to the glasses.  So we thought, OK, that’s kind of interesting. We’re going to push that envelope."

The result was the erection of a new site Tits and Glass ("titsandglass.com"), which gives Glass users an orifice in which to insert videos of their POV glasses-record sexcapades.  So far the site has survived Google's policies, which proved slightly more flaccid censorship-wise than previously thought.

III.  MiKandi, Xbiz Recruit Andy San Dimas and James Dean for World's First Google Glasses Porn

But the developers need a way of drawing coverage to their fresh effort, so they pounded out a plan with Wired and Vice's resident technology maven/columnist Arikia Millikan to use her Glass Explorer, along with Dr. Cocktor's unit in a shoot featuring well known adult actors.

For a male star, they recruited James Deen -- the boy-faced actor who Adult Video News named its Male Performer of 2009 and who was a member of CNBC's 2013 "Dirty Dozen".  For a female performer, they picked Andy San Dimas, an adult actress who was originally recruited off MySpace in 2007 for her first adult film, and who has since achieved crossover appeal starring in Drive and other feature films.

Mr. Deen, for his part, was willing to stroke Google's ego despite the recent TOS changes, remarking, "Ultimately at the end of the day, it’s Google’s product. If Google says 'We don’t want to do that,' then those are the rules."


[Image Source: Vice/Arikia Millikan]

In their shoot Mr. Deen plays the role of a manager in an office and Ms. San Dimas poses as his secretary. The scene itself is previewed in a trailer on YouTube, which shows the directors poking fun at facial recognition and other Glass controversies.  At one point Mr. Deen uses a fictional "X-ray" app to disrobe Ms. San Dimas.  He also uses the glasses to search for definitions of sexual terms and even discover his costar has overpaid on her platform shoes.

So how did the glasses perform in the actors’ eyes?  According to Ms. Millikan's Vice blog, the actors were not entirely thrilled with the glasses, complaining they got in the way and even began to (literally) heat up as the love-making ensued.  But the actors seemed happy enough to yet again confirm "Rule 34" of the internet -- "If something exists, there is porn of it."

James San Dimas
James Deen (left) and Andy San Dimas (right) weren't entirely sold on the experience of Google Glasses sex. [Image Source: Vice/Arikia Millikan]

Ms. Millikan wrote back in 2010 in an Atlantic column:

I work online. I play online. I have sex online. I sleep with my smartphone at the foot of my bed and wake up every few hours to check my email in my sleep (something I like to call dreamailing).  But it's not enough connectivity. I crave an existence where batteries never die, wireless connections never fail, and the time between asking a question and having the answer is approximately zero.

In her piece for Vice's Motherboard chronicling her involvement in the first ever Glass porn, she states that we're still not quite there yet, but we're getting close to that climax, writing:

Though Glass is marketed as a tool not intended not for long-term viewing, but rather as a notification delivery device, watching the footage you’ve recorded #ThroughGlass (as the company forces you to disclose whenever you share a picture via Twitter), is an experience with the powerful ability to transport you to a different time and place. It's not an easy thing, this video camera on your face, and we have a lot of figuring out to do. But it’s an experience that I hope is eventually accessible to anyone who wants to memorialize themselves indulging in the presence of lovers, whether they’re real, a fantasy, or something somewhere in between.

The POV porn flick was coproduced by industry publication XBiz.

Sources: Motherboard, YouTube [NSFW]





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