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Google claims that Microsoft's recent changes to Vista are not enough to be truly unbiased

Google this week filed a brief with a federal judge to extend the 2002 antitrust decree that was placed on Microsoft. Google requested the extension in order for it and other antitrust prosecutors to determine whether Microsoft's Windows Vista operating system is still too restrictive on third party applications.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Justice defended Microsoft against accusations from Google that Vista was anticompetitive in nature. The accusations rooted in the fact that Google Desktop and Windows Vista's built in indexing feature did not play nicely with each other. Google claimed that Vista's indexing feature slowed down the operations of Google Desktop's own searching mechanism.

Despit Google's success in pushing Microsoft to modify Vista, high-ranking Justice Department antitrust official Thomas O. Barnett sided with Microsoft. Barnett claimed that Vista did not exhibit anticompetitive behavior and that Google was barking up the wrong tree.

"The purpose of the consent decree was to prevent and prohibit Microsoft from certain exclusionary behavior that was anticompetitive in nature. It was not designed to pick who would win or determine who would have what market share," said Barnett.

Google said in a statement that while Microsoft did agree to allow users to disable Vista's built in search, it wasn't enough. "More may need to be done to provide a truly unbiased choice of desktop search products," said Google.

In light of Google's antitrust pursuit on Microsoft, Google itself is being probed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) after the purchase of Internet ad giant DoubleClick. Microsoft urged federal regulators to look into Google's purchase of DoubleClick even though it paid $6 billion USD for aQuantive two months after Google's deal with DoubleClick.





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