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Print 28 comment(s) - last by HighWing.. on Nov 5 at 1:01 PM

Google prepares to launch its new mobile phone OS to compete with Windows Mobile.

Verizon Wireless, number two provider of mobile phone service in the U.S. and Sprint Nextel Corp, number three provider of mobile phone service in the U.S., are wrapping up a series of serious talks with Google.  According to The Wall Street Journal, this will lead to a significant announcement from Google within two weeks.

The talks center on the mobile phone OS platform that Google has been developing.  This platform was reported on by DailyTech earlier last month.

The news sent Google shares rising to an incredible $700 USD per share on Wednesday NASDAQ trading, only three weeks after the media gorilla crossed the $600 mark for the first time.
Sprint has already made some commitments to Google, stating that it will offer on its new Wi-Max powered network Google Web search and communications services.

Additional reports indicate that Google has also gained "significant traction" with T-Mobile USA.  T-Mobile is America's fourth largest cell phone service provider.

If Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile indeed announce that a Google based OS will be powering some or all of their next generation smart phones, the move has the possibility to seriously shake-up the Operating System industry.

Furthermore, the Google OS would likely square off in 2008 with Microsoft's next iteration of its Windows Mobile operating system, presumably Windows Mobile 7.0. 

This would be a significant development as it would be the first example of Google directly challenging Microsoft in its largest business sector -- the OS market.

With the support of three of the four largest American mobile providers, many may wonder if Google will look to market its own phones branded under them, similar to the iPhone, as many rumors have suggested.  While no definitive word has been given, the likely answer is no.  Google is traditionally a software company, and hardware can be a much more volatile market.  Also, Google would have to tread the waters of exclusivity contracts.

Instead, Google may release its OS on as many major carriers as it can get on board.

Google has discussed in the past offering the OS for free, something that Microsoft has been unwilling to do.  Google is currently exploring how to incorporate advertisements unobtrusively into its OS.

The OS Google is designing is a modified version of the Linux operating system.  This excites many, as Linux has a strong community of contributor, due to its open source policies.  Also, Linux based operating systems typically run leaner and more efficient, something which would be highly desirable on mobile phones.

Third parties will have full access to develop applications for the OS from the start, and will not have to wait for special software development kits.

Google is also preparing to bid in FCC's upcoming 700 MHz wireless auction.  The company poured lobbying dollars in hopes to change rules to give mobile operators less control over the devices and data applications their customers can use.  Advances in these two campaigns may yield additional cards in Google's hand, which it can use to work out a favorable agreement with America's top wireless providers.

Google sees mobile phones as its next big business sector.  Let's face it; Google has the internet market cornered.  Its name has become synonymous with internet searching, and it offers arguably the most premier free email service, soon to be upgraded to a second iteration.

However, in order to continue its growth, Google must work its way into new markets.  And with a big announcement reportedly coming in less than two weeks, it appears Google is poised to "carpe diem" and boldly venture into this new market.


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Half-baked?
By therealnickdanger on 11/2/2007 9:31:12 AM , Rating: 2
I like Google, but it seems like they exist solely by giving away half-baked products and then justify the poor quality with the fact that it's "free". And no, I don't want ANY ads on my smartphone. I'd rather pay.

I'm a bit jaded since their new IMAP Gmail has trouble when properly routing HTML-based e-mails to my smartphone.




RE: Half-baked?
By darkpaw on 11/2/2007 9:39:09 AM , Rating: 3
Can't say that I'm not interested in seeing what happens, but ads would definitely be a deal killer for me. I dont' want to see ads on my mobile phone.

It would really have to suck hard to be worse then my Moto Q though. Biggest PoS phone I've ever owned, can't wait till I can get something else.


RE: Half-baked?
By OrSin on 11/2/2007 9:46:30 AM , Rating: 2
I like google stuff. Not all or it by any means , but for free I very happy with. Ass for adds on my phone. I'm fine as long it does force me to push and a single bottum to to deal with it. I streaming banner at bottme like a stock ticker is fine. And type of pop-up or message sent I wwould be little pissed. Now if they give free web on the phone then I can take more ads.

quote:
It has also been pouring lobbying dollars at the government in hopes to change rules to give mobile operators less control over the devices and data applications their customers can use. Advances in these two campaigns may yield additional cards in Google's hand, which it can use to work out a favorable agreement with America's top wireless providers.


Can we jsut say they are bribing people. I hate seeing lobbiest talked about like branch for government. It people that know how to put money in policiations hands and not get caught.


RE: Half-baked?
By Oregonian2 on 11/2/2007 2:38:35 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Can we jsut say they are bribing people. I hate seeing lobbiest talked about like branch for government. It people that know how to put money in policiations hands and not get caught.


Do you think this way about the lobbyists that are promoting something that you like? GreenPiece (tm) surely has lobbyists, the Red Cross probably has lobbyists, likewise for whatever major organizations you belong to. Even the ARRL (ham radio hobby organization) does. If people or groups don't get their opinions delivered to those in government then one is likely to be unhappy when those opinions and wants get unfulfilled or unaddressed. In the U.S., we're not a pure democracy, we use elected representatives, and those representatives need to be informed of what people want, and lobbyists is a major way of that happening (in addition to the letter you, I'm sure, write them regularly).


RE: Half-baked?
By FITCamaro on 11/2/2007 9:53:38 AM , Rating: 2
While I love Gmail, I see two problems with this.

1) Ads. I don't want them on my phone. Period.

2) Application support. Will it sync with Outlook? Will it support Microsoft document formats? Etc. Application support for Windows Mobile and Palm OS is already there. None exists for Google's mobile OS.


RE: Half-baked?
By omnicronx on 11/2/2007 11:39:32 AM , Rating: 2
Don't forget how many open source coders there are out there. The Google OS will be based on Linux, and from the sounds of it, applications could be on the way before it is even released.


RE: Half-baked?
By FITCamaro on 11/2/2007 5:37:44 PM , Rating: 2
It may be based on Linux, but that doesn't guarantee an open platform. I would think phone manufacturer's would want some control of whats installed on the phone. Otherwise people might find a way to exploit things.


RE: Half-baked?
By Pandamonium on 11/2/2007 1:45:48 PM , Rating: 2
I don't expect ads. I expect something along the lines of associating your sim card with your google account, and then the phone activity would be tracked kind of like GPS+/-100ft. That way they could target ads to you when you're online later on. If it allows them to only tell that you're in a shopping plaza, supermarket, or mall, that's enough to deliver targeted ads.


RE: Half-baked?
By Pandamonium on 11/2/2007 1:54:14 PM , Rating: 2
I wish I could just add-on to my earlier post, but...

Google's advertising revenue comes mostly from advertising from online merchants. All your local B&M's still advertise with their circulars. I'm sure the B&M's would love a cheaper method to target local buyers, and this allows that. Hell the range of error could be +/- 500ft and your shopping patterns could be easily tracked.


RE: Half-baked?
By Suomynona on 11/2/2007 10:03:40 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, it would be extremely difficult for them to integrate ads into a cell phone without being extremely obtrusive. The only reason people don't mind ads on Google searches is because there's enough real estate on a computer monitor to allow them to blend in. If they could somehow pull that off on a tiny-ass phone screen without destroying the user experience, I would be impressed.


RE: Half-baked?
By fic2 on 11/2/2007 12:02:58 PM , Rating: 3
I must use my phone differently than a lot of people complaining about ads on the phone. I generally put my to my ear/mouth and talk on mine. During this time I am not usually looking at the phone. I must be weird or something to use a phone to actually talk to other people.


RE: Half-baked?
By SirLucius on 11/2/2007 12:41:56 PM , Rating: 2
I'd say you're in the minority if you only use your phone to call people. Even my mom uses her phone for the occasional text message. And plenty of people buy feature packed phones so that they can listen to mp3's, browse the web, check their email, text message, and make of use of PDA functions. All of those things require some substantial time looking at the screen. I don't want ads taking up precious space on an already small screen when I'm trying to send a text message or check an appointment. Just because you don't take advantage of the extra features of a phone doesn't mean others don't either.


RE: Half-baked?
By FITCamaro on 11/2/2007 5:40:11 PM , Rating: 2
Guess I'm part of that minority too. Darn. I don't have text messaging options on my phone. I think text messaging is dumb. If I need to ask someone something, I'll call them. Hence why I paid for a phone. And why they have one as well.


RE: Half-baked?
By HighWing on 11/2/2007 1:42:38 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
I must use my phone differently than a lot of people complaining about ads on the phone.


You obviously only use your cell phone as a phone and thus there is a good chance you might never even use a phone with the Google OS. This new OS seems to be targeted at Smart Phones, (which a lot of people here seem to have), and other devices like the side kick. People that have these phones view the screens more often. And as anyone that uses one of these devices knows, beyond the message your looking at and the various menus/buttons, there is not much room left to put any kind of decent picture ad. A scrolling text ad like a stock ticker previous mentioned on here is probably the best way to go.


RE: Half-baked?
By Oregonian2 on 11/2/2007 2:42:55 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe you should get into the habit of speakerphone mode, or maybe using a bluetooth headset thingie (wife likes those). That way you can look at ads on the phone while talking!

When they tie in the voice recognition to catch product categories being talked about they can show you ads real time related to discussion topics! Neat huh!

not


RE: Half-baked?
By HighWing on 11/5/2007 12:52:18 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
When they tie in the voice recognition to catch product categories being talked about they can show you ads real time related to discussion topics! Neat huh!


That actually sounds quite interesting, however, the first thing that comes to mind with that is then you could get distracted looking at the ads and completely blank on what and who your talking to while you check out an ad that popped up on your phone. Would make for some interesting phone conversations lol


RE: Half-baked?
By AlexWade on 11/2/2007 12:55:34 PM , Rating: 3
The TRUE deal killer is that it is on Sprint. Sprint can't do any level of service right. Rude customer support, dropped calls, calls that don't go through, all these things happen with Sprint. My local cable company uses Sprint for its VoIP, and it costs $15 more a month than Vonage. I wish Sprint and their sorry service would die, and take their nickel-and-diming attitude with them.

I'm surprised Verizon is letting Google do this since Verizon loves to lock out features that cut into their revenue. I'll agree Verizon has a good network, however.


RE: Half-baked?
By HighWing on 11/5/2007 1:01:42 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Sprint can't do any level of service right.


I think that really depends on where you are because I switched to Sprint from Verizon because I was unhappy with Verizon's customer support. I had a simple billing mistake that was their fault. The forgot to setup the second phone I bought with a service plan, and thus all the calls made on it were long distance romaing. I spent 2 hrs at the store, 1 hr waiting with NO other customers, then another hour with the rep only to be told I had to come back again to finish fixing the problem. This went on again 4 more times in the same fashion with nothing getting fixed before I finally told them I want some sort or compensation or else I'm switching to Sprint. They refused to give me anything so the next day I switched. Since then any problem I've ever had was solved in 15 min or less. Funny side note, but a week after I switched Verizon called offering me a new phone if I switched back, and I gave em hell because that was what I was asking for if they wanted to keep me before I switched.


RE: Half-baked?
By Oregonian2 on 11/2/2007 2:09:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And no, I don't want ANY ads on my smartphone. I'd rather pay.


I don't think you'll be required to buy one of Google's phones (or even use their free crappy software either).

Just ignore it.

P.S. - Wonder if there will be bootleg "adblocker" programs to install on their phone....


By GeorgeOrwell on 11/3/2007 2:59:51 PM , Rating: 2
Google is nothing more than what you would see if the NSA/CIA/Mossad/etc were a private company. You have the aggressive "indexing" of everything in a secret manner. You have the spy vans going through your neighborhood, all major cities, etc. (but not through the enclaves of the wealthy). You have spy satellites zooming in from above. And through the entire system you have spy bots("ads") keeping track of what people are thinking/doing.

The stock price is kept artificially high (through deals with a number of Wall Street firms) so that dramatically fewer people become shareholders. Google's financial obscurity ("how many ads are really out there?", "how much money was really generated?", etc) allows these same firms to launder billions of dollars through Google.

It will not take much longer before it is very clear that Google is by far the biggest evil in high tech. In fact, some "normal" people will finally get that Google is the company that has been tasked to make "1984" a reality. Some of these people will know, without a doubt, that they helped make it happen, that they were the "willing idiots". So it goes.




By rdeegvainl on 11/4/2007 6:01:32 AM , Rating: 2
ummmm any proof of any of that, or can we just dismiss it?


By GeorgeOrwell on 11/4/2007 6:22:57 PM , Rating: 2
All the facts have been verified by the most trusted authorities. Even the watchdog committee was unable to find any discrepancies. The facts themselves and the verification processes are beyond any doubt whatsoever.

Do not let your own personal desire to believe in Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, The Easter Bunny, and "Spontaneous Acts of Love and Kindness Performed by Greedy Corporations" cloud your judgment, son.


Nit pick
By NedKelly1977 on 11/2/2007 10:05:00 AM , Rating: 1
Google is also preparing to bid in the upcoming in the government's upcoming 700 MHz wireless auction.

Little deja vu in that sentence there.

Always like the articles, just think that proof reading would help. :)




RE: Nit pick
By cochy on 11/2/2007 2:46:16 PM , Rating: 3
Welcome to the department of redundancy department.


Compete with windows mobile?
By Griswold on 11/2/2007 9:49:01 AM , Rating: 2
I guess they need to aim low, considering how Symbian is the OS to beat if you want to be king of the hill thanks to the strong arms of the big players in the mobile industry (Nokia and SE for example).




more ads
By Screwballl on 11/2/2007 11:05:37 AM , Rating: 2
Next on the Violence Channel... "Ow my bawls" (with all the ads on the outer edge surrounding the show in the middle).




A little too much euphoria here
By ChipDude on 11/2/2007 2:57:44 PM , Rating: 2
Today Google dabbles in many areas, but what is lost on most is that it has only really monetized search. Don't get me wrong they found the golden goose here and no one is coming close to catching them here.

I think gphone will make an impact and they'll add another angle to monitizing internet info thru the mobile phones but the reality on their larger business is going to be small.

Many of their other projects have produced useful and interesting applications but NONE are close to generating the profits that search has produced nor will any produce anything close to what they have now nor grow at any rate close to their search business. Sure the billions of mobile phones sounds like a goldmine but that is a business already owned by a huge an powerful group of companies that aren't going to cede the goldmine to google.

Thus 700 bucks share price is just ludicrious. Basiclly the price is driven by scarcity of shares as well as a rediculous belief that google with soon find other business that can grow and spin cash off they way search has. The fact search is so successfuly and that google dominates such a large part frankly means this exponential growth will come to a very quick end. Once that curve keels over you'll see this stock pop faster and steeper then crox's did yesterday and their will be some serious googly eyes when that happens.




No ads fro me
By hitman699 on 11/4/2007 12:26:44 PM , Rating: 2
I pay enough for my phone and enough for my plan.. not going to take any ads... unless my phone is 100% free and there is NO monthly fee to use my phone for unlimited minutes... then maybe I will allow an ad or 2.




"There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance." -- Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer

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