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The "tree lobster", a rare species of giant insect was thought to be extinct.  (Source: Patrick Honan)
Invasive species almost killed these magnificent bugs, but in the end they were saved by a chance relocation

What black and shiny and as big as your hand?  If you guessed "Devonian Period-esque mountain insect" you are a winner.

The bizarre Dryococelus australis is a throwback species.  The hardy arthropods long hailed from Lord Howe Island, a small island midway between Australia and New Zealand.  The species of tree insect lived fruitfully since the human colonization of the island, until a fateful day in 1918, when disaster struck.

Lord Howe Island
Lord Howe Island
[Images Source: Stephanie d'Otreppe / NPR (left), Wikimedia Commons (right)]

The S.S. Makambo a sea liner travelling from Britain ran aground.  And from its destroyed hull scurried several small mammalian survivors -- European black rats.  The omnivorous mammals soon found an indigenous food they were quite fond of -- the tree insect.  Soon, thanks to the invasive species, the insects -- which locals affectionately referred to as "tree lobsters" had joined the likes of the Tasmanian Wolf -- extinct.  Their last sighting was in 1920.

But 13 miles away from the tiny Lord Howe Island (modern population: 341) sits an even tinier island, the spire remnant of a sea volcano, dubbed "Ball's Pyramid" after the British naval office who first spotted the 7 million year old spire in 1788.

Ball's Pyramid
Ball's Pyramid [Images Source: John White (left); Google Maps (right)]

The spire is utterly uninhabitable and remote, but proved a joyous climb for adventurers with a solid set of equipment.  And those climbers discovered the island's secret -- a spindly bush located in a nook 225 feet above sea level.

Climbers in the 1960s first noted insect corpses resembling the famed tree lobsters.  But confirmation was difficult as the beasties were nocturnal.  But in 2001 a pair of Australian scientists David Priddel and Nicholas Carlile and two assistants scaled the island.  At first they were discouraged at seeing only crickets.

But under a melaleuca bush they spotted insect droppings.  Returning with flashlights at night they hit pay dirt -- 24 scurrying tree lobsters climbing on the bush and in the dirt below it.

Tree Lobsters
Meet the "tree lobster" in all her glory!
[Image Source: Rod Morris (left); Patrick Honan/Nick Carlile (right)]

Fast forward two years and Australian researchers and conservationists had received permission to collect a few of the insects for a captive breeding effort.  A landslide had recently struck and the researchers were fearful they'd be returning only to find insect corpses.  But the insects had apparently survived everything nature had thrown their way and were still scurrying about their favorite bush.  

Four were collected on Valentine's Day 2003.  Tragically, two quickly died.  That left only a male and female, which researchers named "Adam" and "Eve".  Eve almost perished as well due to illness, but was cured at the last moment by Patrick Honan, head of the Melbourne Zoo's invertebrate conservation breeding group.  Recalls Jane Goodall in a Discover magazine piece and a separate story with Australian Broadcasting Company:

Eve became very, very sick. Patrick ... worked every night for a month desperately trying to cure her. ... Eventually, based on gut instinct, Patrick concocted a mixture that included calcium and nectar and fed it to his patient, drop by drop, as she lay curled up in his hand.

She went from being on her back curled up in my hand, almost as good as dead, to being up and walking around within a couple of hours.

Eve survived and bred with Adam, producing 30 fertile eggs.  The babies would go on to flourish.  And from that line 700 adults and tens of thousands of eggs have been bred.

In a world first, zookeeper Rohan Cleave captured the amazing hatching process of a critically endangered Lord Howe Island Stick Insect at Melbourne Zoo. The eggs incubate for over 6 months and until now the hatching process has never been witnessed. If you didn't see it you wouldn't believe it could fit in that egg! [Source: Vimeo/The Melbourne Zoo]


(Note: This success came in part thanks to the fact that invertebrates have shorter, more consistent genomes and thus are less sensitive to lack of genetic diversity in a population.  Two insects can yield a healthy population, where as two mammals -- say tigers -- likely do not have enough genetic diversity to continue a species.)

Today the discussion turns to whether to reintroduce the tree lobsters to their natural home, which mankind disturbed -- Howe Island.  The researchers are conducting a public relations campaign to try to encourage the islanders to embrace their shiny black invertebrate comrades.

Where the story goes next is anyone's guess, but the story of the critters is already quite epic.  To quote Jurassic Park's Dr. Ian Malcolm, "Life will find a way."

Sources: NPR, Discover Magazine, Australian Broadcasting Company



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This is a miracle...
By Roffles on 2/29/2012 7:58:53 PM , Rating: 5
Cheers to Patrick Honan for following his gut. That must be an awesome feeling to know that you took the last two of a species and turned them into a thriving population.




RE: This is a miracle...
By tviceman on 2/29/2012 8:54:33 PM , Rating: 2
I wonder how many species humans have been responsible for their extinction in the past 150 years. Probably a figure that would make quite a few people sick to their stomach, I imagine.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Reclaimer77 on 2/29/2012 9:24:45 PM , Rating: 3
Nature, evolution, natural selection etc etc have been responsible for tens of millions of extinctions along Earth's history.

But yeah, boooo humans!

I thought humans were just another animal with a slightly evolved brain. Why should we be sick that we've done what ever other animal tries to do? Natural selection. Top of the food chain baby.


RE: This is a miracle...
By RubberJohnny on 2/29/2012 10:26:54 PM , Rating: 3
Everyone on this forum knows you're an exception, your brain has slightly de-evolved...

Don't you remember your spiderman quotes? "with great power comes great responsibility"


RE: This is a miracle...
By Reclaimer77 on 2/29/12, Rating: -1
RE: This is a miracle...
By RubberJohnny on 3/1/2012 12:53:53 AM , Rating: 1
Ouch you really roasted me there. /sarcasm

If you can't detect the tounge-in-cheek nature of both my points then you're the goose.

Does it make it less so if it came from a movie? would it be better if it came from the mouth of your favorite philosopher or political leader?

I've seen your posts throughout this site and you are a maladjusted human being, hence why you get rated down consistanly. Your latest one just about takes the cake though!


RE: This is a miracle...
By Reclaimer77 on 3/1/12, Rating: -1
RE: This is a miracle...
By Mitch101 on 3/1/2012 1:42:02 PM , Rating: 3
RE: This is a miracle...
By Reclaimer77 on 3/1/2012 3:02:06 PM , Rating: 1
LOL I love that flick.

"What are electrolytes!? Do any of you even know?"

Dumb woman: "They're umm..what plants crave."


RE: This is a miracle...
By slunkius on 3/1/12, Rating: 0
RE: This is a miracle...
By AnnihilatorX on 3/1/2012 6:49:26 AM , Rating: 1
You seem to not know what the word natural in natural selection means. I suggest looking it up in the dictionary.

If men's balant destruction of nature, for example, slashing and burning the rain forest to grow soya bean is natural selection, even though I am an atheist God can have take my life right at this moment. I don't want to live in this world anymore.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Camikazi on 3/1/2012 9:37:24 AM , Rating: 3
Well technically we are part of nature, regardless of our technology. We did evolve here and live here we are just more like a plague, but then again even plagues have their uses, once we kill ourselves off only the strongest species left (if any really) will take over and be stronger for us being here.


RE: This is a miracle...
By AnnihilatorX on 3/1/2012 10:16:35 AM , Rating: 3
Yes I know that. But justifying irresponsiblity to care for the enviornment by 'natural selection' is as bad as justifying genocide in the name of 'lowering CO2 emission'.
It's just plain wrong.


RE: This is a miracle...
By kattanna on 3/1/2012 10:30:24 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
You seem to not know what the word natural in natural selection means. I suggest looking it up in the dictionary.


What i always find interesting is how some think that when other species alter the environment around to their benefit, or even when their waste products alter the environment so that it kills off many other species, its all natural. But anything humanity does is "unnatural"

its an interesting aspect of western societies that they feel such guilt for having succeeded


RE: This is a miracle...
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 10:37:39 AM , Rating: 2
I can only assume its because we use guns (cheating) and not our bare hands! Damn us for being efficient! If I/we could run after a bear, tackle it, and bite on its neck hard enough to kill it... it would appear pretty natural and the environmentalists wouldn't see an issue (maybe).


RE: This is a miracle...
By Nanobaud on 3/1/2012 12:35:57 PM , Rating: 3
Actually, it turns out that if you do that, you can be arrested. Go figure.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Reclaimer77 on 3/1/2012 3:09:07 PM , Rating: 1
You're right, beans shouldn't be grown there. People should just starve if they have to clear forest to grow things or live. I mean it's not like trees can ever grow back, nope. Once you clear part of a forest, it's gone forever /sarcasm

Excellent stance you've taken. Bravo.

quote:
even though I am an atheist God can have take my life right at this moment. I don't want to live in this world anymore.


What?


RE: This is a miracle...
By thurston2 on 3/1/2012 8:53:22 PM , Rating: 4
If those beans were being grown to feed starving people you might have a point, but they're not. The beans are grown for people that already eat too much. It's not like you to care about starving people anyway.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Skywalker123 on 3/2/2012 12:20:28 AM , Rating: 2
The forest is gone forever moron, as long as humans are here.


RE: This is a miracle...
By thurston2 on 3/1/2012 11:57:08 AM , Rating: 2
Just because you can do something doesn't mean you have to.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Skywalker123 on 3/2/2012 12:16:09 AM , Rating: 5
Fortunately, one day you'll be extinct.


RE: This is a miracle...
By ekv on 3/2/2012 4:22:26 AM , Rating: 2
Ironic. That song is already writ.
Spernit Deus
Ma tu piu che mai dura


RE: This is a miracle...
By overlandpark4me on 2/29/2012 11:50:20 PM , Rating: 2
Calm down.


RE: This is a miracle...
By kattanna on 3/1/2012 10:23:41 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I wonder how many species humans have been responsible for their extinction in the past 150 years


considering nature itself is responsible for making extinct 99.99% of all species to have ever lived, mans contribution is incredibly tiny by comparison.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 10:43:27 AM , Rating: 2
Let's not forget that there's still millions of species yet to be discovered. Treehugger.com estimates over 750,000 species yet to be discovered in the ocean alone! I wonder how many species were actually created by the presence of mankind (by changing the landscape and such) ? Oh wait... we only kill... so that can't be a possibility. Stupid Humans!!


RE: This is a miracle...
By bah12 on 3/1/2012 1:35:41 PM , Rating: 2
So true, In fact I know of a certain Black Rat that is now much stronger thanks to it's new island home! Where is the article thanking mankind for making the European Black Rat even stronger.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 2:23:20 PM , Rating: 2
WOW... way to go out on a limb and not pick the one species mentioned in the article. Can you elaborate on "stronger?" I'd love to hear your story. Nah, Just kidding. I really don't. In fact I'm trying to feel the same joy some of you are having on your new found love of the Tree Lobster. Wait.. its coming... no wait.. yeah... Still don't care about 'em!!


RE: This is a miracle...
By bah12 on 3/2/2012 11:14:38 AM , Rating: 2
Why are you so upset? I was agreeing with you.
quote:
I wonder how many species were actually created by the presence of mankind (by changing the landscape and such) ?
In that our actions are not only evil and one sided. The rats in my example are stronger as a species because by globalizing them we have strengthened their resilience to extinction. So in this example we haven't created a species as you suggest, but we have had a positive impact on it's evolution (from the rat's perspective that's a good thing).


RE: This is a miracle...
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/2/2012 11:36:09 AM , Rating: 1
My bad... LOL! I read it with your view being: Our existence only makes shitty creatures stonger (i.e.. that one-sided "evil" aspect). So, yes, you would be correct. From the rats perspective, they're pretty happy!


RE: This is a miracle...
By bah12 on 3/2/2012 11:54:35 AM , Rating: 2
Exactly, and who needs more giant bugs anyway. Now at least if I were stranded on said island I could BBQ up some rat. Not ideal, but better than giant ass bugs :)


RE: This is a miracle...
By BSMonitor on 3/2/2012 9:37:56 AM , Rating: 2
Moron, you just made the point against yourself.

EUROPEAN Black Rat.

The EUROPEAN Black Rat does not have the ability on its own to invade this island and be stronger.. So our laziness in keeping rats off our ships caused the disruption of another environment which would never have been disturbed otherwise.

Explain how this is our "advanced evolution".


RE: This is a miracle...
By bah12 on 3/2/2012 11:04:28 AM , Rating: 2
I never said we evolved, rather I was referring to us strengthening the European Black Rat as a species by bringing it to a this island. Now as a species it is more resilient to extinction as a direct result of man.

It was a poor attempt at humor. Obviously I don't think the world needs more rats, but the irony is that human interaction has 2 effects here. Depending on your point of view as a species we are either "good" or "bad". To the rats our actions were "good" albeit at the expense of the poor tree lobsters.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Jacerie on 3/1/2012 2:03:33 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I wonder how many species were actually created by the presence of mankind (by changing the landscape and such) ?


Do you count bacteria, virii, and such? If so then we deserve a decent bit of credit.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 2:29:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Do you count bacteria, virii, and such? If so then we deserve a decent bit of credit.

I have no doubt mankind "carries" a lot of bacteria and virus' and such. So do dogs, cats, fleas, mosquitos, rats, etc. The question is.. how many of these has Mankind "created?" From what I can tell: 1

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/discoveries/2...


RE: This is a miracle...
By JediJeb on 3/1/2012 4:18:47 PM , Rating: 2
Probably more if you count all the new strains of microbes we have created that are anti-biotic resistant that didn't exist before.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Zingam on 3/1/2012 5:41:58 PM , Rating: 1
Yeah, if I could only make the cockroaches extinct! I've killed at least hundred since October last year, when I moved into my new room and they just keep coming. Some days I kill up to three.
And I am reluctant to use poison, etc.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Reclaimer77 on 3/1/12, Rating: 0
RE: This is a miracle...
By ShaolinSoccer on 3/1/2012 7:12:31 PM , Rating: 2
Combat Roach Killing Gel is the best stuff to use by far. Every single person I know that has tried it doesn't have anymore roaches.


RE: This is a miracle...
By Skywalker123 on 3/2/2012 12:22:25 AM , Rating: 4
Cockroaches were here before us, and will be here long after we're gone.


RE: This is a miracle...
By mars2k on 3/1/2012 9:05:12 AM , Rating: 3
The real miracle here is that no one noticed that this island is really one of Dr. Evil's many vacation homes. Congrats to Honan


RE: This is a miracle...
By VahnTitrio on 3/1/2012 10:29:37 AM , Rating: 5
I don't think they are the last two; but still the last two we had in captivity. There is likely still a small population on Ball's Pyramid as well.


RE: This is a miracle...
By 8meagain on 3/11/2012 3:50:23 AM , Rating: 2
You gotta be kidding, RIGHT!?! I bet you'll be thanking him when this planet is called, "Planet of the Tree Lobsters!!!"

Will someone clone Charleton Heston so he can star in the remake???

oh yeah, and "Return to the Planet of the Tree Lobsters!!!"


I don't care how endangered they are
By FITCamaro on 2/29/2012 7:23:57 PM , Rating: 5
If I saw one of those things around me, it'd be getting the flat side of the largest object I could find.




By AliShawkat on 2/29/2012 7:45:25 PM , Rating: 2
lol +1


RE: I don't care how endangered they are
By Hakuryu on 2/29/2012 8:28:33 PM , Rating: 4
Can you imagine the 'campaign' to convince the villagers to have their island seeded with these things?

"Hi Mr. Islander. I'd like to distribute thousands of these huge prehistoric insects around your home and workplace. Oh, and you can't kill them; they are endangered."

I do however think the story and the results are quite amazing. I just wouldn't want them around me.


RE: I don't care how endangered they are
By Gurthang on 3/1/2012 8:38:13 AM , Rating: 3
I don't know if they are really nocturnal, don't voraciously eat food crops, or make people's homes their home. I'd take them over those introduced rats any day.


By TSS on 3/1/2012 2:02:59 PM , Rating: 2
Their nickname is "tree lobsters".

I figure they live in trees.

Rats on the other hand prefer human dwellings.


By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 10:46:10 AM , Rating: 2
I can't remember the last time "insect" and "pretty nice to have around" appeared in the same sentence (other than this one). They could be decepticons!!!


... and the benefit is?
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 10:06:38 AM , Rating: 2
I can't help but laugh at the idea that we're now saving insects from extinction. What exactly is the benefit of reintroducing this? Anyone? Grins and giggles? Food for a sloth? Or just something else for humans to swat at and spray with RAID? Seems like these Tree Lobsters used their spidey senses to migrate and save themselves... and are now being tossed around for the sake of science. How about... leave em alone and let them live/die by their own doing?




RE: ... and the benefit is?
By woody1 on 3/1/2012 11:53:10 AM , Rating: 1
For that matter, what's the value in preserving the lives of Conservatives/Social Darwinians? Anyone?


RE: ... and the benefit is?
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 2:39:07 PM , Rating: 2
YAY for you! Strapped on those big boy pants, licked your fingers, and typed out your political jab all by yourself! 2 points!


RE: ... and the benefit is?
By osserc on 3/2/2012 11:13:50 AM , Rating: 2
Someone needs to grow the food you eat...


RE: ... and the benefit is?
By Rinadien on 3/1/2012 1:14:03 PM , Rating: 2
Except for the part where their near extinction was NOT caused by "their own doing" and instead by the rats that humans introduced to their environment...


RE: ... and the benefit is?
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 2:34:49 PM , Rating: 2
LOL! Why stop at mankind? The Tree Lobster was almost made extinct by the rats that the humans introduced... that came from the monkey, that came from fish, that came from water, that came from cell, etc!

If the rats didn't get em, something else would have!


RE: ... and the benefit is?
By Zingam on 3/1/2012 5:47:19 PM , Rating: 1
Which is exactly and truly: natural selection. They were too weak to survive.
Why didn't the rats die instead?


But what about....
By Fenixgoon on 2/29/2012 11:17:57 PM , Rating: 5
the rock lobster?




RE: But what about....
By Jason H on 3/2/2012 12:50:31 AM , Rating: 2
It already migrated from a bus, to a plane, to a UFO and to outer space, baby!


RE: But what about....
By Ramstark on 3/2/2012 8:29:24 PM , Rating: 2
EPIC WIN !! \m/,


*sigh*
By Kyuu on 3/1/2012 1:23:07 PM , Rating: 2
The fact that other animals alter their environment, that species can and do go extinct without human intervention one way or the other, and similar tripe is no justification for being an ecological douchebag. In the case of these insects, a human ship ran aground and introduced an invasive species that completely eliminated the population of said insect, and the species only survived by happening to have a small colony on a nearby, barren little island. There were two scientists with the interest and capability to bring them back from the brink of extinction, and they did. The end.

Yeah, they're "only" insects, but then, you're only an annoying, mostly bald mammal. Why should I give more of a crap about you than I do these insects? At least they don't engage in partisan political posturing as people like FITcamero and Reclaimer like to do, and I bet they're less repulsive to look at too (yeah, I had to sneak in a personal attack in there, this is DailyTech isn't it)?

But really, if you're going to pull the "we're animals too so it it's okay if we destroy the environment blah blah blah" argument it goes both ways. If you poke an animal enough, it may get mad and tear your throat out. So I guess it's okay if these people that FITcamero and Reclaimer are continually poking on this website go ahead and do that? I mean, you just said it's okay since we're only animals right?

We have the capability to understand the effect we have on our environment and the other forms of life we share this planet with, and the capability to affect it on a much larger scale than any other form of life here ever could. The gift of that level of mental acuity also gives us the responsibility to be ecologically mindful as we progress forward whenever possible. Unless you're an uncaring douchebag, of course. But I'd rather share my bed with these giant insects than live in the sort of world that will result from progressing without any thought to preserving the environment and our fellow life forms inhabiting this rock.

Oh and Mick... you really need to have an editor look over your articles and/or proofread through a couple times. There are some incredibly awkward sentences in there.




RE: *sigh*
By Keeir on 3/1/2012 2:03:02 PM , Rating: 2
Mammal population on islands to evolve in sometimes surprising ways

To reintroduce this insect to the Howe Islands, all the rats had to be eradicated. This would prevent the birth of a new species evolved out of these rats.

Humans have made a value judgement in this case.

1.) This strange insect's past place on this island is more important than rats' future place on the island.
2.) The difference in value is worth enough to enact the change and maintain the change.

I think both 1. and 2. are arguable points... for any perspective except one that says "We humans are gods! The enviroment around us in X year MUST NOT CHANGE!"


RE: *sigh*
By daneren2005 on 3/1/2012 6:10:41 PM , Rating: 2
The problem with these stupid projects is that they aren't trying to save actual lives, they are trying to preserve a SPECIES. These people don't give 2 craps about the actual insects themselves, they are just trying to stop species from going extinct. Why in the world does the existence or non-existence of a species make any difference?


RE: *sigh*
By osserc on 3/2/2012 11:22:26 AM , Rating: 2
I'm still trying to determine which part of a ship wreck is a deliberate attempt to upset an isolated ecosystem.

And further, what is the benefit to the planet of spending so much time and energy rebuilding this species of insect?

It seems like a standard scientific ego trip, but as long as they aren't siphoning the money from my pocket then they are free to trip all they want.


Yes!
By kjboughton on 2/29/2012 11:05:18 PM , Rating: 4
I can't wait to step on one!




...
By kleinma on 3/1/2012 12:39:58 AM , Rating: 4
what black and white and lacks an editor....

DailyTech




Ugly buggers
By hduser on 3/1/2012 11:37:18 AM , Rating: 3
I heard lobster and I got out the butter. Looks like I'll have to put it back in the fridge.




Discover Magazine
By CZroe on 2/29/2012 11:32:42 PM , Rating: 2
I read about this quite a long time ago but it's been a while since I subscribed to Discover Magazine. I do recall reading it from Jane Goodall though.




lobster
By gnac on 3/1/2012 2:09:45 AM , Rating: 2
better rename them - calling them lobsters will ensure their demise




Cool
By Paj on 3/1/2012 7:03:25 AM , Rating: 2
They look awesome - tree lobster is an apt name. Must have been really exciting for everyone involved.

This article is a solid primer on some important evolutionary concepts.




So then...
By mitchrj on 3/1/2012 1:30:44 PM , Rating: 2
Am I the only one that hit the 2 min mark (or around there) and yelled "Hurry up already!"




Is it just me...
By wyrmslair on 3/2/2012 1:22:34 PM , Rating: 2
or does anyone else see "butter bugs"?

I'm waiting to hear that they've developed one with a Vorkosigan crest before I take that joke any further but still, they look just like what I envisioned from the books.




Ball's Pyramid
By The Raven on 3/2/2012 5:09:20 PM , Rating: 2
Is it just me or did this remind anyone else of Krull?




Very awesome indeed!
By Rob94hawk on 2/29/12, Rating: -1
RE: Very awesome indeed!
By FITCamaro on 2/29/2012 7:23:03 PM , Rating: 5
So be the first to aid the human race in its population reduction and kill yourself.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Rob94hawk on 2/29/12, Rating: -1
RE: Very awesome indeed!
By FITCamaro on 3/1/2012 7:44:43 AM , Rating: 2
I own my own home, am a software developer, and live 2 states away from "mommy and daddy".

It's time for you to latch onto this thing called reality.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By lagomorpha on 2/29/12, Rating: 0
RE: Very awesome indeed!
By FITCamaro on 3/1/2012 7:45:06 AM , Rating: 4
After I have kids I probably will.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By thurston2 on 3/1/2012 11:54:26 AM , Rating: 2
Please don't breed.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By FITCamaro on 3/1/2012 1:15:32 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah wouldn't want more people in the world who believe in self responsibility, hard work to get what you want, and common sense.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Rob94hawk on 3/2/12, Rating: 0
RE: Very awesome indeed!
By osserc on 3/2/2012 11:25:32 AM , Rating: 2
Pot, meet Kettle.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Rob94hawk on 3/2/2012 8:58:28 PM , Rating: 1
Look into mirror then repeat that again.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By RedemptionAD on 3/1/2012 1:01:09 PM , Rating: 2
It's the Circle, The Circle of Life.... *Que, Elton John*


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Skywalker123 on 3/2/2012 12:26:37 AM , Rating: 2
The human race would benefit much more if YOU slit your throat.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Reclaimer77 on 2/29/12, Rating: 0
RE: Very awesome indeed!
By safcman84 on 3/1/2012 8:46:36 AM , Rating: 2
Humans introduced rats to the island, and that wiped out the population.

Invasive species (usually introduced by human activities) causes plenty of problems for native species on all continents.

As for too many humans bit: African Elephants have made an impressive comeback in terms of numbers, but because humans need so much land the Elephants are now being seen as a nuisance and are being kept in some relatively small areas - which means the Elephants are now being blamed for over-grazing and deforestation.

Yes natural selection would have wiped out some species anyway (I dont see the point in trying to save the Giant Panda which is too lazy to have sex), but human over-population or human activities are causing some species to go extinct when they wouldnt do if left on their own,


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 10:18:23 AM , Rating: 2
At what point would you consider the species to human ratio equal and what would you use to quantify that? Its easy to cherry pick elephants and/or tigers dying off by the hand of mankind... but their near extinction is mostly because their exotic and actually worth something. What about plain ol deer, turkeys, chickens, bears, squirrels, etc? There is a reason for hunting season... only the naive would think otherwise.

Dinosaurs are extinct; What of it? Would you not agree that their extinction paved the way for mankind? I imagine in your world, we could happily co-exist and protect ourselves and assets using government mandated Dino insurance!!!


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Reclaimer77 on 3/1/2012 2:25:58 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Humans introduced rats to the island, and that wiped out the population.


It wasn't malicious! Rats have been known to float to an island on a piece of wood and do the same thing. And what about birds and other predators that were almost certainly feasting on these bugs too? Hello? I guess that's our fault too.



RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/1/2012 2:47:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I guess that's our fault too.

Resist using common sense and just feel guilty about the whole thing. You'll save yourself a lot of typing! LOL!

Watch how easy this is: I'm Sorry!

Done!


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By BSMonitor on 3/2/2012 9:44:57 AM , Rating: 2
Yet it wasn't until the human shipwreck that enough rats were introduced to wipe out the insect population. Millions of years prior, floating rats and random birds hadn't managed it.

Good reasoning there. You are a genius.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By osserc on 3/2/2012 11:30:07 AM , Rating: 2
And you can guarantee that the same thing wouldn't have happened without the shipwreck?

I hate to use Dinosaurs as an example... but they were around for millions of years before they became extinct. Could have happened to these tree lobsters as well.

To assume that these insects would somehow be immune to extinction without the accidental intervention of man and rat is absurd.


RE: Very awesome indeed!
By Rott3nHIppi3 on 3/2/2012 11:47:41 AM , Rating: 2
I love the notion that the eco chain stops at the rat! That no European sewer rats serve as food for owls, or cats, or foxes. Does he ever consider how much happier the NY sewer alligators are? Hello, Foreign Cuisine. Thanks, fatal shipwreck!


"So if you want to save the planet, feel free to drive your Hummer. Just avoid the drive thru line at McDonalds." -- Michael Asher














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