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Print 24 comment(s) - last by Omega215D.. on Dec 2 at 11:50 PM

The GE, Comcast deal could be done as early as Thursday

General Electric and Comcast have worked out a deal in which Comcast will receive a majority stake of the NBC Universal broadcasting company once Vivendi signs away its 20% stake.

NBC could be a joint operation between GE and Comcast for a few years, and then GE is expected to leave the company behind in 2012 or 2013.  NBC Universal currently includes Universal Pictures movie studios, cable channels USA, Syfy, Bravo, and the Universal Studios theme parks.

GE now controls 80% of the company, with an estimated value of $30 billion -- Comcast will receive the company and its $9 billion debt, while Comcast is expected to include its own cash contribution.  When the deal is completed, Comcast will become one of the largest entertainment companies in the world, and may be better suited to battle The Walt Disney Co.

GE has manufactured a wide range of industrial products ranging from dishwashers and light bulbs to jet engines, but its interest in NBC has always been rather intriguing.  The company didn't want to spin off NBC, but has struggled greatly due to the global economy, while spinning off other businesses.

In the future, GE plans to attempt to rejuvenate its manufacturing branches, while leaving other industries alone, analysts believe.

The Federal Communications Commission must now take a look at the deal -- which could take up to one year to complete -- though the companies involved do not expect any major problems from the federal government.





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So..
By Xed on 12/2/2009 6:52:36 AM , Rating: 3
Will Verizon start airing "I can't stream that" commercials now?




RE: So..
By amanojaku on 12/2/2009 7:54:10 AM , Rating: 5
The NBC peacock at the bottom of every program will be changed to a "ToS"

"Streaming media to my desktop? There's a cap for that!"

"Free and randomly placed porn with every Disney or Cartoon network program."

On viewing a poor quality HD signal:
"Can you clear me now?"


RE: So..
By AlexWade on 12/2/2009 8:17:01 AM , Rating: 2
I hope this Comcast deal means that NBC will stop making green week one big GE commercial.


RE: So..
By MrBlastman on 12/2/2009 11:37:11 AM , Rating: 2
If anything this is good for GE. The less they orient themselves with political bias the better in the long run for their brand. They've been in the mud on the street over some of the stuff that has come out about them lately, this will go a ways towards helping them get back to "business."


RE: So..
By Xed on 12/2/2009 8:15:45 AM , Rating: 2
Cocmast's secret plot to remain ahead of AT7T as the most hated provider in America.

Step 1 - Buy NBC
Step 2 - ???????
Step 3 - Get Luke Wilson to do more bad commercials
Step 4 - Slap an apple logo on all products


RE: So..
By Xed on 12/2/2009 8:22:53 AM , Rating: 5
With my quality editing I should put in for Mick's Job. ;)


RE: So..
By Spivonious on 12/2/2009 8:59:17 AM , Rating: 2
hehe...Cock-mast.


RE: So..
By Omega215D on 12/2/2009 11:50:28 PM , Rating: 2
is that the poor man's version of eXtenze?


So on the surface...
By wysingertech on 12/2/2009 8:18:44 AM , Rating: 2
GE is unloading NBC Universal. That's a little benign.

However lets look at where this is likely going.

1. Comcast has already been toying with bandwith caps, both 'experimentally' and illegally for which they got their wrists slapped.

2. Comcast has been a huge moving force behind the 'anti' net nutrality movement, pushing to allow the ISP's to determine data priorities for their networks, and potentially allow for paying users to get that data priority.

3. Comcast is making a move to also purchase/acquire Hulu, arguably the number one provider for streamed broadcast video media. (Coincidentally Hulu has already been planning a paid service model to be implemented in the next few years.)

Doesn't this seriously constitute a breach of any and all anti monopoly legislation?

They (Comcast) are already on record complaining about Youtube and Google bandwith comsumption.

So devils advocate here... all these studios and media companies that host their own content which they allow people to log in and view, think it would be beneath Comcast to throttle their bandwith to ensure Hulu was the only non-stuttering portal to view said content?

I would love to hear your opinions either way.




RE: So on the surface...
By wysingertech on 12/2/2009 8:26:51 AM , Rating: 1
Sorry to reply to my own post but two additional bits for your consideration:

Comcast already has a service monopoly in a number of markets, or at least severely limited competition.

Hulu content vesus the same content on a media companies site, the Hulu content is often edited.


RE: So on the surface...
By Spivonious on 12/2/2009 9:02:57 AM , Rating: 2
I don't see how anti-trust laws come into play. Could you explain that a bit more? Points 1 and 3 are perfectly legal. A company can do what it wants to as long it's not illegal. Implementing bandwidth caps and changing Hulu to be subscription-based are not illegal. As far as net neutrality, there are no laws on that yet, so we'll have to wait and see (and of course contact your representative/senator to make sure your opinion is heard).

They do have a monopoly for cable TV service in their areas. That monopoly is government-mandated.


RE: So on the surface...
By acortez on 12/2/2009 9:37:26 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
They do have a monopoly for cable TV service in their areas. That monopoly is government-mandated.


Then what are FiOS and Sat?


RE: So on the surface...
By Spivonious on 12/2/2009 9:42:03 AM , Rating: 2
They're not cable TV providers?


RE: So on the surface...
By cplusplus on 12/2/2009 4:25:42 PM , Rating: 2
Yes, they are. U-Verse and DirecTV/Dish Network, anyone?


RE: So on the surface...
By acortez on 12/2/2009 9:42:27 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
So devils advocate here... all these studios and media companies that host their own content which they allow people to log in and view, think it would be beneath Comcast to throttle their bandwith to ensure Hulu was the only non-stuttering portal to view said content?


That would require some really slick BW measures.
More likely is that all owned Comcast content resides solely on the Comcast network so that Comcast customers get the best experience compared to say someone else outside of their networks.


RE: So on the surface...
By Suntan on 12/2/2009 12:47:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
think it would be beneath Comcast to throttle their bandwith to ensure Hulu was the only non-stuttering portal to view said content?


I'm sorry, could you please provide me a link to this other hulu site you talk about. The one you say provides non-stuttering content...

-Suntan


By nafhan on 12/2/2009 9:37:42 AM , Rating: 2
Infrastructure companies like Comcast controlling content is doubly bad for the consumer, because in addition to bundling services, they will be bundling content with the services, making it difficult or impossible for non-Comcast users to legally obtain that content. I see this causing a big uptick in BT usage and file sharing related lawsuits, if Comcast handles this like I expect them to.
I think best case for the consumer would be to purchase a connection from a company like Verizon or Comcast and then add services such as TV, phone, or internet from the company of the customers choice.




By therealnickdanger on 12/2/2009 10:23:23 AM , Rating: 2
Certain vehicles are restricted from certain roadways. Certain fluids are restricted from certain pipelines. Restricting content to infrastructure seems to be the norm in most other sectors. And we all know that the Internet is like a series of tubes...


By mindless1 on 12/2/2009 9:15:09 PM , Rating: 2
... yes I'm in favor of restricting the internet to certain kinds of electrical signals - those that carry data


It was nice while it lasted...
By kjboughton on 12/2/2009 8:59:11 AM , Rating: 3
Great....say 'bye-bye' to Hulu.




By Spivonious on 12/2/2009 9:03:58 AM , Rating: 2
Honestly, I don't see what Hulu gives me that I can't watch on the network's own website. But then again, I don't watch much TV.


SciFi Channel, oops SyFy
By JediJeb on 12/2/2009 10:37:04 AM , Rating: 2
I just hope this doesn't kill SciFi any worse than NBC already has. Seems all there is on it now are mutant sharks, ECW, and fairy tales. Stargate Universe, Eureka and to some extent Sanctuary are the only things SciFi left on it. They had Dr Who for a little while, but sadly even that is gone now. If only Fox would buy it and get Lucas to release his Star Wars series on it that is coming in a couple years that would be nice.




RE: SciFi Channel, oops SyFy
By kattanna on 12/2/2009 11:04:09 AM , Rating: 2
IMO, most of the stuff on syfy nowadays is pure crap. the new stargate universe is a perfect example.


By Motoman on 12/2/2009 9:23:39 AM , Rating: 2
...the fact of the matter is I watch very little TV - and I really don't pay attention to what channel a show is on...I just find it in the guide and *boop*

But, I would most definitely prefer poking myself in the eye with a red-hot badger to giving Comcast one red cent. On my scale of evils, they are right there just a snick under eBay/PayPal.

If/when this deal goes through, I will absolutely be paying attention to what network a show is on - and if it's on NBComcast, I won't watch it.




"Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine." -- Bill Gates










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