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Print 27 comment(s) - last by Furen.. on Jan 16 at 12:53 AM

A Colorado private investigator has become the first person to plead guilty in the spying scandal that has rocked HP

Bryan Wagner, a Colorado private investigator ensnared in the Hewlett-Packard pretexting spying scandal that was disclosed in late 2006, recently plead guilty to conspiracy and aggravated identity theft charges in a San Jose federal court.  Although complete details of his plea deal with prosecutors remained sealed, it appears that he is fully cooperating with an ongoing federal probe that may target other people related to the case, including former HP Chairwoman Patricia Dunn.  Wagner will testify for the prosecution against those related to the case, though it has not been published who he would testify against.

Wagner was involved with gathering personal and confidential data on a number of HP board members and journalists.  He admitted to falsely creating a phone account in the name of a Wall Street Journal reporter while using the same reporter's Social Security number to access personal phone records.  This activity, known as pretexting, is illegal in California but also becomes a federal crime when financials or Social Security records come into play.

"He's accepting full responsibility for his actions, although he never thought or intended that they were illegal.  He was just doing a job, doing work that he was assured was above the board," said Stephen Naratil, Wagner's attorney.

Wagner may have to serve time in federal prison, but that ultimately depends on his level of cooperation with the government.  Dunn and HP's former ethics director, Kevin Hunsaker, face the same charges but have plead not guilty.


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Typo
By MustaineC on 1/13/2007 6:13:29 PM , Rating: 5
"Although complete details of his plea deal with prosecutors has remained sealed..." = have

Ok now, downraters, I'm all yours.




RE: Typo
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 1/13/2007 6:21:15 PM , Rating: 2
Death to passive tense!


RE: Typo
By Whedonic on 1/13/2007 10:26:54 PM , Rating: 2
Up with the subjunctive pluperfect!


RE: Typo
By SunAngel on 1/13/2007 6:34:20 PM , Rating: 3
Your pretty safe from downrating. 5/8 of the commentors on DailyTech can nolonger rate. The other 3/8 are part of the elite conspiracy.


RE: Typo
By MustaineC on 1/13/07, Rating: 0
RE: Typo
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 1/13/2007 7:01:08 PM , Rating: 2
Several months ago we changed the comment system so that only those who comment regularly would get moderation points. We were seeing a few cases of abuse where people were registering accounts and not commenting in order to moderate.

If you comment regularly, you'll get moderation privledges.


RE: Typo
By Samus on 1/13/07, Rating: 0
RE: Typo
By MustaineC on 1/13/2007 10:51:05 PM , Rating: 2
Is there any minimum number of points? How does it work?


RE: Typo
By pakigang on 1/14/07, Rating: 0
RE: Typo
By SoBizarre on 1/14/2007 7:59:51 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
If you comment regularly, you'll get moderation privledges .


<gmp (getting moderation privileges )>
Right...
</gmp>


RE: Typo
By jon1003 on 1/14/2007 8:33:23 AM , Rating: 3
I think this system might just lead to lots of worthless posts...


RE: Typo
By SunAngel on 1/14/2007 10:32:03 AM , Rating: 1
shush! you'll wake the mods.


RE: Typo
By LuxFestinus on 1/14/2007 2:54:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Several months ago we changed the comment system so that only those who comment regularly would get moderation points. We were seeing a few cases of abuse where people were registering accounts and not commenting in order to moderate.

If you comment regularly, you'll get moderation privledges.


I sure do hope that moderation points will be assigned based on your total score as well as the number of replies to the article with the lowest scores weeded completely out for moderation. This should help in reducing worthless posts.


RE: Typo
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 1/14/2007 3:15:13 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I sure do hope that moderation points will be assigned based on your total score as well as the number of replies to the article with the lowest scores weeded completely out for moderation. This should help in reducing worthless posts.I sure do hope that moderation points will be assigned based on your total score as well as the number of replies to the article with the lowest scores weeded completely out for moderation. This should help in reducing worthless posts.


This is correct. If you have a low average post score there is a possibility you will never get moderation privileges.


RE: Typo
By LuxFestinus on 1/14/2007 2:56:00 PM , Rating: 2
Also I have noticed that once I comment, my votes go completely away.


RE: Typo
By PitViper007 on 1/15/2007 8:32:23 AM , Rating: 4
And it's a wonderful thing too. Admittedly, I don't comment often, but I do often enough apparently that I get plenty of moderation points. I tend to try to use them when someone voices an unpopular opinion and they get marked down for it. To me, if someone puts their thoughts down in an articulate manner, even if they are counter to mine, they deserve to be heard (or in this case, read).

PitViper


RE: Typo
By MustaineC on 1/14/2007 10:11:18 PM , Rating: 2
See? I wasn't so safe! They are just a few, but they have a lot of powa!


RE: Typo
By crystal clear on 1/14/2007 1:47:28 AM , Rating: 2
Out source the typing & proof reading to India(Banglore)-
cheap,fast & accurate

.Outsourcing hits a new class of workers: Journalists
The long arm of 'offshoring' reaches into the news industry

http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/11/19/business/ou...



Good!
By Furen on 1/13/2007 7:46:19 PM , Rating: 2
I'm glad someone got nailed on identity theft charges. Everyone makes a huge deal about identity theft but when a big corporation is the one that does it they start talking about whether or not "pretexting" is illegal without paying attention to the fact that sensitive personal information was used to impersonate another person.




RE: Good!
By Christopher1 on 1/13/2007 11:40:53 PM , Rating: 1
Well, he didn't really steal anyone's identity. He pretended to BE that person in order to get their phone records.

Something that turned out to be illegal in that state, but if someone wouldn't have mentioned in the paper that it was illegal, I would have thought it was legal as well, since the police do it all the time and don't get called for doing it.


RE: Good!
By defter on 1/14/2007 6:38:23 AM , Rating: 2
[quote]Well, he didn't really steal anyone's identity. He pretended to BE that person in order to get their phone records.[/quote]

Huh? Pretending to be someone else is the identity theft...

[quote]I would have thought it was legal as well[/quote]

How would you feel if I go to the bank, "just pretend" to be you and take a large loan? Would you still think that it's legal?


RE: Good!
By masher2 (blog) on 1/15/2007 8:01:54 AM , Rating: 2
> "Huh? Pretending to be someone else is the identity theft... "

No. Pretending to be someone else is just that, nothing more. Identify theft is assuming a person's identity in order to commit financial fraud.


RE: Good!
By Furen on 1/16/2007 12:53:14 AM , Rating: 2
Identity theft is not exclusively committing financial fraud, though that is the most common type. Non-financial identity theft is usually done to either avoid a penalty (like claiming to be someone else when arrested), gain a non-financial benefit or to cause harm to the other party (both of which could apply in this case).


The sharks we want..................
By crystal clear on 1/14/2007 1:24:13 AM , Rating: 2
They got the sardines in the net-now get us some big fishes
in your next catch.

We want some sharks & not stories of the one that got away.

Happy fishing.




RE: The sharks we want..................
By SunAngel on 1/14/2007 12:10:23 PM , Rating: 1
are you referring to the careers this guy ruined, or are you referring to a cover-up?


By crystal clear on 1/15/2007 12:16:54 AM , Rating: 2
These sardines can lead you to the sharks-you got to follow
their trail.
Once the sharks are spotted-then get them.


By HaryHr on 1/14/2007 4:17:35 PM , Rating: 2
Unfortunatly, these sharks are usualy well protected and rarely caught :(


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