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  (Source: nationalgeographic.com)
The country has vowed to connect every resident as a fundamental right of law.

In the U.S., the FCC is currently in the process of working to get broadband access to every American. The government agency has just voted to collect public comments on broadband regulation, in its effort to provide 100Mbps to 100 million homes, but the country of Finland is one step ahead.  

Finland has made history as the first country to guarantee high speed internet to every one of its citizens. 
 
As of July 1 of this year every resident in Finland has the legal right to access broadband. The country's government is promising its residents a minimum of 1Mbps (megabit per second) broadband connection.  The country vows to connect everyone to a 100Mbps connection within the next five years.   

According to
BBC NewsFinland's communication minister Suvi Linden explained that they considered the role of the internet in Finns everyday lives, they concluded that the internet is no longer just for entertainment, Linden said.

"Finland has worked hard to develop an information society and a couple of years ago we realized not everyone had access." 

The new law forces telecommunications companies to lower their prices.

The government said that from the first of this month all local telecoms providers must offer both home users and business clients "reasonably priced connections".

"From now on, a reasonably priced broadband connection will be everyone’s basic right in Finland. This is one of the government’s most significant achievements in regional policy and I am proud of it," said Suvi Linden, Finland’s Minister of Communications.

A large portion of the majority are already online, over 95 percent, and only about 4,000 homes still need connecting to comply with the law.

While the issue of piracy remains a concern for Finland as well as the rest of the world, Linden said that the Finnish government will adopt a policy where operators will send letters to illegal file-sharers, but they are not planning on cutting off access. 





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