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"We lost I.N.T.E.L.L.I.G.E.N.C.E! I repeat, we have no I.N.T.E.L.L.I.G.E.N.C.E."  (Source: Paramount Pictures)
The NSA revelations have made others fear for their privacy

The National Security Agency's (NSA) spy programs has put some strain on ties between the U.S. and Europe, and the European Commission is looking to ratchet back some of America’s power. 
 
A recent press release from the European Commission said that the EU demands less U.S. influence and greater transparency when it comes to the organization of the internet. For instance, ICANN -- a California-based organization that works with the U.S. government -- among orter things works to coordinate IPv4/IPv6 address spaces and helps to manage the top-level domain name space.
 
Specifically, the European Commission called for:
 
Establishment of a clear timeline for the globalization of ICANN and the “IANA functions”; strengthening of the global Internet Governance Forum; launching an online platform for creating transparency on internet policies; a review of conflicts between national laws or jurisdictions that will suggest possible remedies; an ongoing commitment to improve the transparency, accountability and inclusiveness of the multi-stakeholder processes and those who participate in these processes; a commitment to creating a set of principles of Internet governance to safeguard the open and unfragmented nature of the Internet, and a commitment to globalize key decision-making to safeguard the stability, security and resilience of the Internet.
 
"Europe must contribute to a credible way forward for global internet governance," said Neelie Kroes, Commission Vice-President in charge of telecoms policy. "Europe must play a strong role in defining what the net of the future looks like."
 
The European Commission is due to vote today on whether more data gathered on the internet is stored on computer servers in Europe, which would give it more oversight. 
 
Last month, Microsoft's general counsel Brad Smith said that customers outside of the U.S. would likely feel more at ease with not only having their data stored in a non-U.S. facility, but also choosing the exact location of the data center after the NSA revelations. 
 
The NSA has been under the microscope ever since former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked details about the NSA's secret spy programs to the media early last year. It was later revealed that Snowden conned between 20 to 25 NSA employees to give him their login credentials and passwords while working at the NSA regional operations center for a month in Hawaii last spring. From there, he used a cheap Web crawler to find secret NSA documents, downloaded them, and leaked the information to the media.
 
Since then, it has been revealed that the NSA taps into tech companies' data centers to search for information specifically on foreign customers in an effort to detect terrorist activity. But the NSA was gathering certain information without any specific reason, leading non-U.S. citizens to fear for their privacy.

Source: Europa.eu



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Free Speech
By villageidiotintern on 2/12/2014 12:32:07 PM , Rating: 3
Given the EU's free speech advocacy record, I'd say they should have no hand in the regulation of the interwebs.




RE: Free Speech
By Reclaimer77 on 2/12/2014 12:45:14 PM , Rating: 1
Global Internet Governance?

That send a shiver up anyone else's spine?


RE: Free Speech
By amanojaku on 2/12/2014 12:55:46 PM , Rating: 2
From the source:
quote:
The Commission proposes:

Concrete actions such as:

Establishment of a clear timeline for the globalisation of ICANN and the “IANA functions”

A strengthening of the global Internet Governance Forum

Launching an online platform for creating transparency on internet policies, the Global Internet Policy Observatory

A review of conflicts between national laws or jurisdictions that will suggest possible remedies

An ongoing commitment to improve the transparency, accountability and inclusiveness of the multi-stakeholder processes and those who participate in these processes

A commitment to creating a set of principles of Internet governance to safeguard the open and unfragmented nature of the Internet

A commitment to globalise key decision-making (for example the coordination of domain names and IP addresses) to safeguard the stability, security and resilience of the Internet.
This has nothing to do with spying on Internet users, and everything to do with ensuring that all of the companies involved in making the Internet infrastructure work (IPs, DNS, security, email spam, etc...) do so together. Right now, the US pretty much dictates how the Internet is built technologically, and countries have varying policies.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Internet_Gover...


RE: Free Speech
By Manch on 2/12/2014 4:20:28 PM , Rating: 1
What all this really means is:

EU: You have the power right now and we want it.

US: No

Obama: No? By no you mean yes we can! please, take it, we're too powerful

Obama: and I apologize on behalf of America

EU: Obama has let us run in thru the back door again! I love this guy!

US: Da fuq?

All joking aside, The internet will never be truly free of government interference. What makes one government better than the other? More specifically what makes the EU better than the US in regards to governing the internet?

Not a d@mn thing. They would be worse. Look at all the crazy censorship bullsh!t happening now in the EU. I dont want that pushed on me.


RE: Free Speech
By tanjali on 2/12/2014 5:16:28 PM , Rating: 1
Obama, U.S. and U.S. government have nothing to do with NSA.
They are entity on its own.
Even U.S. government and congress is involuntary under NSA claws.
What that says about U.S.?


RE: Free Speech
By Manch on 2/12/14, Rating: 0
RE: Free Speech
By Captain Orgazmo on 2/12/14, Rating: 0
RE: Free Speech
By Strunf on 2/13/2014 7:41:33 AM , Rating: 2
The moment you defended Berlusconi you lost all credibility... as for the rest you just prove your extreme right-wing believe, I for one welcome the "mass immigration of non-integrating, poor, uneducated migrants", I do not think I'm superior to them and if they get a better life by joining us in our great EU more power to them, the more of them there are the more the EU will be diverse and less full of bigot heads.


Get your own
By Ammohunt on 2/12/2014 2:17:33 PM , Rating: 1
The EU is free to build their own internet in anyway that suits them the last thing we need is EU bureaucratic inefficiencies interjected into the management of the internet. At this time from my home internet connection i have little reason to share packets with the majority of Europe and block at the firewall most of the world already.




RE: Get your own
By tanjali on 2/12/2014 5:22:29 PM , Rating: 2
E.U has undemocratically chosen governance and has no vote in saying what's right and wrong.
Herman Van Rompuy???,, who voted him for presidency?
Right, no one, or no one that is legitimate for choosing such a position.


RE: Get your own
By Strunf on 2/13/2014 7:45:22 AM , Rating: 2
You're telling me Americans voted for the ICANN ? I think not and even if that was the case why would American decided on how the Internet should work when the Internet doesn't really have borders... if anything the body regulating the Internet should be made with people from different countries, but then again that is probably not going to benefit the US agenda...


As if....
By ranran on 2/12/2014 12:53:30 PM , Rating: 2
...almost every other country isn't trying to do the exact same thing? Who is naive enough to think that there are governments that don't have the same end goals?




I agree completely!
By rountad on 2/13/2014 11:03:49 AM , Rating: 2
I also think that I am justified in setting up a tent in my neighbor's front yard and then complaining about his sprinkler system's timer not being set according to my convenience.




...
By amanojaku on 2/12/2014 12:45:56 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
For instance, ICANN -- a California-based organization that works with the U.S. government -- assigns Web page addresses, which allow computers to locate each other.
No. ICANN does not assign web page addresses, because web pages do not have addresses. ICANN allocates large blocks of IPs to regional registries, who then sell smaller blocks of IPs to entities like Amazon, Google, and even you, dear reader, if you can justify it. ICANN also regulates top-level domains (.com, .info, .us, localhost, etc...)

Web pages are HOSTED on systems that have addresses. You can't ping www.dailytech.com/About.aspx, which is a web page. You CAN ping the DNS address www.dailytech.com, which has the IP address of 199.19.80.13. This allows web pages to be hosted on any type of addressing system (DNS, IPv4, IPv6, etc...) without modification, which would be impossible if web pages had addresses.




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