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He gave a lecture at the HOPE conference

Former U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden is dedicating his time to teaching everyday people about technologies that allow for anonymous communication and message encryption. 

According to Reuters, Snowden recently spoke to attendees at the New York City conference called Hackers On Planet Earth (HOPE) -- via video, of course, since he's still in Moscow -- about technologies that can protect citizens from government snooping. 

"You in this room, right now have both the means and the capability to improve the future by encoding our rights into programs and protocols by which we rely every day," said Snowden. 

"That is what a lot of my future work is going to be involved in."

One of the technologies included a system called SecureDrop, which allows people to anonymously leak documents to journalists.


This hits home for Snowden, since he blew the cover on the NSA's surveillance programs early last year. These programs consisted of bulk data collection from sources like phone records, where the government took on a "collect now, filter later" approach. The agency has said that the bulk data collection was meant to identify terrorist threats, but it's been discovered that the data of Americans has been collected without any clear evidence of terrorist links.  

It was later revealed that Snowden conned between 20 to 25 NSA employees to give him their login credentials and passwords while working at the NSA regional operations center for a month in Hawaii. Snowden reportedly told the NSA employees that he needed their passwords in order to do his job, and after downloading secret NSA documents, he leaked the information to the media

After the leaks, Snowden ended up in Moscow, Russia. He requested to extend his Russian visa earlier this month, since it expires at the end of July. But the U.S. wants Russia to send him home to face criminal charges for the NSA leaks. 

Source: Reuters





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Really?
By BRB29 on 7/21/2014 12:10:21 PM , Rating: 1
let's SecureDrop all sensitive materials straight to Russia!

Who would really fall for this?




RE: Really?
By retrospooty on 7/21/2014 12:18:28 PM , Rating: 5
When it comes to who to trust with your personal info and the choices are the US govt. and Russia, I choose none of the above.


RE: Really?
By FITCamaro on 7/21/14, Rating: -1
RE: Really?
By hughlle on 7/21/2014 12:54:29 PM , Rating: 5
Should not be allowed? So what, lock them in a dungeon? or?

Meanwhile in reality, human being have the ability to do whatever the hell they like. Security measures are used, be it an NDA, or a background check or what have you, but at the end of the day, if you give someone access to sensitive data, then you have to accept that that data may very well be brought to the public attention. If the government decides to take things one step too far, and those security measures won't mean crap.

Maybe if the government didn't act in such a manner, people wouldn't feel the need to leak information. But it's the leaker who is to blame of course.


RE: Really?
By Moishe on 7/24/2014 4:28:57 PM , Rating: 2
It is the leaker who is to blame.

The ethical problem that Americans face isn't which side to pick (NSA or Snowden), it's how to see the positive in a crime and still punish the criminal.

What the government did/is doing is a crime.
Snowden committed treason.
Both are crimes that can have societal benefits.

Why does it make any sense to be forced to choose one of the two sides? They're both crimes and they're both harmful. BOTH should be punished. The American people (and the world) got a lot of insight into the NSA, which is great. This Snowden clown gave away state secrets and at least we got some information out of it. That doesn't mean we have to embrace Snowden. It also doesn't mean we have to allow our corrupt government to continue lying, stealing, and cheating us "for our own good."

I've been convinced for a long time that the govt (and other social engineers) use these ethical conundrums to confuse the issue and create a haze of uncertainty where they can operate. The grey area between bad and good is where they like to live.


RE: Really?
By nafhan on 7/21/2014 1:17:44 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Government employees should not be free to leak whatever information they feel like the media should know to the media.
You are absolutely correct, and also sort of wrong at the same time.

This is, in essence, why we need good whistle blower protection laws. If he had leaked something like troop movements that did nothing positive for our country, sticking with the laws for things like treason would make sense, he should prosecuted and possibly executed, etc.

What actually happened is that the info that Snowden has brought to light has made clear to a lot of people practices that our government really shouldn't be engaging in, and that, IMO, is a good thing. He, again IMO, should be protected by whistle blower laws, as any harm done to our country is our governments' fault for violating the intent if not always the letter of the constitution.


RE: Really?
By Reclaimer77 on 7/21/14, Rating: 0
RE: Really?
By sgw2n5 on 7/21/2014 1:50:35 PM , Rating: 5
I think a Senator or oversight committee would have blown him off, or simply *disappeared this information that was/is particularly embarrassing and damaging for the credibility of some government programs.

Sometimes, extreme circumstances call for extreme measures?

I wouldn't have gone about it the same way, and he did some fairly unscrupulous things to get the data, but the end result I think is positive so far.


RE: Really?
By Spuke on 7/21/2014 1:53:35 PM , Rating: 2
I'm sure he could've found one Senator that would've helped him out. He could've even went straight to the media.


RE: Really?
By sgw2n5 on 7/21/2014 2:07:43 PM , Rating: 3
I kinda feel for the guy. He basically ruined his life to "take one for the team."

Did he expose all of the abuse in the most intelligent (and legal) way? Hell no. Am I glad that he did expose much of what has been going on? Yes.


RE: Really?
By Reclaimer77 on 7/21/2014 2:16:31 PM , Rating: 2
As a cynic, I have a hard time believing someone in a high-paying job would ruin his life to "do the right thing".

Part of me is still waiting for the -gotcha-, where he gets rich from selling data to the Chinese or Russians. Or some scheme of his is revealed and we all feel like idiots for believing in him.

As to your second point, yeah that's pretty much how I feel.


RE: Really?
By GotThumbs on 7/21/2014 2:29:36 PM , Rating: 2
Everyone has their limit as to what they can turn a blind eye to.

Would you intervene if you saw someone repeatedly stealing from a co-worker or stealing someones work or beating an animal or fellow human? How would you benefit from intervening? You wouldn't, other than having a clear conscience that the abuse has stopped or at least is now known to everyone.

Regardless of how low today's social morals fall, everyone inherently knows right from wrong. How long would you allow the abuse to continue?


RE: Really?
By Reclaimer77 on 7/21/14, Rating: 0
RE: Really?
By Spuke on 7/21/2014 6:45:52 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Yes I DO know right from wrong, which is why unlike Snowden, I don't WORK for the NSA in the first place...
If he hadn't worked there, we wouldn't have known about all this. And the gov would've been still pulling the wool over our eyes.


RE: Really?
By Moishe on 7/24/2014 4:34:21 PM , Rating: 2
I'm glad the information came out, but what he did was still wrong and I am sure some of it was harmful to the country, which sucks.


RE: Really?
By Grast5150 on 7/22/2014 11:20:58 AM , Rating: 3
Recalimer,

Snowden was seeing the abuse with his own eyes and more than that he was performing the abuse as well. When you can take no more and have to perform some action, what do you do when the organization is an all powerful security and information government organization which is capable and legally allowed to lie and not share information with the representatives of this country.

Simple, you go somewhere where they cannot reach you.


RE: Really?
By Spuke on 7/22/2014 12:21:10 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Simple, you go somewhere where they cannot reach you.
Some of our Congressmen have security clearances. he could've went to one of them. I don't know. I understand that would be really risky but Russia HAS been known to turn "spies" back over to us before. Going that route has risks too. If it was me, I would've tried to make it work here.


RE: Really?
By LevelUp on 7/22/2014 6:16:29 PM , Rating: 2
Then you would have been in prison right now just like the other whistleblowers that have tried to expose truth under this administration. The reason he went this route is because of the examples before him.


RE: Really?
By GotThumbs on 7/21/2014 2:29:36 PM , Rating: 2
Everyone has their limit as to what they can turn a blind eye to.

Would you intervene if you saw someone repeatedly stealing from a co-worker or stealing someones work or beating an animal or fellow human? How would you benefit from intervening? You wouldn't, other than having a clear conscience that the abuse has stopped or at least is now known to everyone.

Regardless of how low today's social morals fall, everyone inherently knows right from wrong. How long would you allow the abuse to continue?


RE: Really?
By Moishe on 7/24/2014 4:20:09 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed.
What if he was a Russian spy in the classic sense and the whole NSA thing is just a social engineering method of extracting him.

Russia plants a spy in the NSA.
The spy steals info.
The spy discovers "wrongdoing" on the part of the US Govt.
The spy publicly returns home to Russia using the "wrongdoing" as his cover.
The spy is a hero instead of a villain even though he did the same spying other "traitors" have done.


RE: Really?
By ritualm on 7/21/2014 4:00:03 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
He compromised the security of 25+ individuals in order to blatantly steal Government data.

Then again, even the folks working for the NSA turned out to be just as dumb as the typical office worker when it comes to IT security - with the added bonus of working for the government ("do as you are told, or suffer the consequences").
quote:
He didn't go to a Senator or an oversight committee to present his findings. He just flew off to China, then Russia, giving them who-knows-what kind of information.

Can you really blame him? Obama hates whistleblowers with a passion. Snowden would be given an immediate death penalty with nary an appeal hearing if he leaks all that stateside.

99% of Capitol Hill is bought and sold to the highest bidder, and the remainder gets vilified in public discourse. Obama has the American MSM in its pocket. What makes you think leaking that classified information to anyone up there is better than doing it from a nation USA cannot touch?

Both Hong Kong and China were illegally wiretapped by the NSA. Whatever goodwill USA has built since the 1997 handover was rendered null on the spot, and everyone was rightly fuming mad. Obama managed to do what even Chinese leaders themselves couldn't for years - turn an entire generally-apathetic population, from loyalists to libertarians, united against USA. I was absolutely in love with how the HKSAR handled US extradition demands over the guy.
quote:
from the moment he stole data that wasn't his to steal, he ended any chance to come home a free man

Why should that matter?

The Obama Administration has so much power, that if you have ANY dirty laundry to air against the Commander-in-Chief, you have no choice but to denounce your American citizenship at the door and become an enemy of the state. Best to leak info while holed up in a place where Obama can't kill with a drone strike without triggering a nuclear war.


RE: Really?
By Reclaimer77 on 7/21/2014 4:18:50 PM , Rating: 1
Again, just giving my reasons why I don't think the proposed law would protect him. Not saying I disagree with any particular point of yours.

But part of him had to know he was doomed the moment he stole documents and fled. There's just no coming back from that.


RE: Really?
By ritualm on 7/21/2014 4:46:55 PM , Rating: 2
No US law will protect Snowden at this point. Having that guy banned to prison for life with no parole would be one of the greatest victories for Obama, and I'm certain the President will bend anything to get there.
quote:
part of him had to know he was doomed the moment he stole documents and fled

Trust is everything in the intelligence community; he's done the very moment he misuses the trust (ask subordinates for their logins) for his own ends.

Not that it matters much when TPTB decides trust doesn't have to be a two-way street.


RE: Really?
By Spuke on 7/21/2014 6:49:52 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But part of him had to know he was doomed the moment he stole documents and fled. There's just no coming back from that.
He knew he was f$%ked. I don't think he was that naive.


RE: Really?
By Manch on 7/22/2014 3:41:46 AM , Rating: 2
and those 25 people should lose their clearance for their idiocy. You are briefed add nauseam that administrators do not need your password to perform their jobs!


RE: Really?
By Grast5150 on 7/22/2014 11:16:36 AM , Rating: 1
Why not FIT? Only in extreme cases should government information be kept classified. Those cases could include foreign espionage, US citizen private information, and US defense information to name a few. So basically Defense and Foreign Espionage.....

All other government organizations need, should and are supposed to be free and open to US citizens. Where does this idea of the government keeping secrets from its own people which they are suppose to serve come from?

Snowden's case in point. He release information about a NSA program which a SECRET Court (FISA) said was legal to operate. Two things wrong here...

1. FISA is illegal and needs to brought into the light of day. The law cannot operate in secret. Either the law is argued and applied in the light of day or the US is just another oligarchy government being run by the 1%.
2. The NSA should not have the legal authority to spy on US citizens without due process as part of public record.

Back to my point, FISA ruled that NSA program was legal. But since that was done in secret, I as a citizen had no ability to comment or seek change with my representatives. My representatives Congress and Senate were not allowed to know of the program either. So in short, secrecy removed my constitutional right to be secure in my papers and persons. I had no recourse because it was all secret from me and my representatives.

A republic cannot operate this way. As a citizen I must have the ability to know the laws, sanctions, and operations of my government. This is to allow the ability to change these laws, sanctions, and operations if I disagree or believe they infrenging on my rights.

That is what Snowden did! He restored my ability to know how my government was violating my rights and give me the ability to petition my representatives to CHANGE the law and make it stop.

So I ask the question again, where is it laided out in the framing of our government to keep secrets from its citizens?


RE: Really?
By Spuke on 7/22/2014 12:25:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
My representatives Congress and Senate were not allowed to know of the program either.
It's not a secret from them. If they really want to know (some of them do have security clearances), they have ways of finding out even if the NSA and the White House were to stonewall them.


RE: Really?
By Reclaimer77 on 7/21/2014 12:28:51 PM , Rating: 2
I think we're starting to see the price Snowden is paying for Russia's "protection"...

Did people really think there wouldn't BE a price?


RE: Really?
By Manch on 7/22/2014 3:44:44 AM , Rating: 2
Tiffany should change the title of this article to

Edward Snowden Presents Tech to Send Leaked Info to Russia


RE: Really?
By Invane on 7/21/2014 12:39:04 PM , Rating: 2
Yes, let's jump to unfounded and unsupported conclusions. So far the only people involved in this scandal that have been proven to be lying are the ones in our government. Snowden has a vastly greater degree of credibility than the US government in my opinion. If you can show some useful data/facts to support the conclusion you are jumping to, then please do so as opposed to spreading FUD.

And I most assuredly believe something like this is necessary. This administration has attacked whistle blowers at every opportunity. On the other hand, journalistic protections seem to be under fire as well. I'm willing to bet if the government can't get the leakers, they'll just step up efforts against journalists.


RE: Really?
By nafhan on 7/21/2014 1:08:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
let's SecureDrop all sensitive materials straight to Russia!
So, it's an open source program that uses Tor + a drop server hosted by a participating news organization. Based on what I've read using it drop info straight to Russia would be counterproductive.

Here's more info:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SecureDrop


For sale: Unwanted Patriots.
By drycrust3 on 7/21/2014 5:15:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
He requested to extend his Russian visa earlier this month, since it expires at the end of July. But the U.S. wants Russia to send him home to face criminal charges for the NSA leaks.

With the amount of evidence and suspicion that a Russian backed para-military unit was responsible for the mid-air destruction of the flight MH17 aircraft, the world wide calls for the Russian Government to reign them in, and the chaotic handling of the crash scene by the local gun totting militia, I think Snowden has become a "sacrificial pawn" and will be on an outbound flight very soon.




RE: For sale: Unwanted Patriots.
By M'n'M on 7/21/2014 5:42:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think Snowden has become a "sacrificial pawn" and will be on an outbound flight very soon.

I don't see it. That would smell of a deal between Putin and Obama. Putin may want to do some face saving but he's in the driver's seat re: MH17 and has owned Obama since Syria. Putin has no need to cut any deal w/the US.


RE: For sale: Unwanted Patriots.
By Spuke on 7/21/2014 6:51:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Putin has no need to cut any deal w/the US.
Indeed. Obama is face down/ass up on this one.


not quite
By chromal on 7/21/2014 12:17:23 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
After the leaks, Snowden went to Moscow, Russia for safety.

Gee, that's funny, I seem to remember him going to Hong Kong after the leaks and getting trapped in Russia when the US State Department suddenly cancelled his passport. Selective memory?




RE: not quite
By GotThumbs on 7/21/2014 2:33:54 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly.

I support Snowden for what he did and consider him a whistle-blower (up to this point).

It seems more and more US Citizens are living by the mantra of 'Ignorance is bliss'.

`Best wishes keeping what you earned.


Did he con NSA employees?
By leadpoop on 7/22/2014 2:56:58 PM , Rating: 2
"It was later revealed that Snowden conned between 20 to 25 NSA employees to give him their login credentials and passwords while working at the NSA regional operations center for a month in Hawaii. "

It is my understanding that Snowden has flat out denied that accusation. Not saying it's right or wrong but you state it as fact. I just checked online and I can only find him denying this.

I know the Government is saying he did, but do you really believe the Government?

We have DNI James Clapper blatantly lie to Congress, and we have Keith Alexander giving misleading testimony. You can understand my reluctance to believe anything that comes out of their mouths. Clapper should be in prison for perjury.

Are you just repeating what our Government is saying without asking for proof?




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