backtop


Print 8 comment(s) - last by vol7ron.. on Jan 24 at 9:41 AM


Google Offers  (Source: Mashable)
Groupon in Google's crosshairs

Google is set to launch a new service of users called Google Offers. The new service will be in direct competition with Groupon reports Mashable. Mashable was given some documents by a source that outline Google’s plans and what the service will look like.

Google Offers is a group buying service and the description from the leaked documents describes it as, "Google Offers is a new product to help potential customers and clientele find great deals in their area through a daily email."

The service at its core will be an offering that emails coupons for the user's local area to them on a daily basis. The sample coupons show things like 50 percent discounts on food at a local restaurants.

Google Offers will be paid for using Google Checkout and will integrate with Facebook, Twitter, Google Reader, Google Buzz, and will have other email sharing options along with those main sharing options. Apparently, the search is on for participants in local markets and odds are the early advertisers on the service will be major chain restaurants and locally owned businesses.

Google told Mashable, "Google is communicating with small businesses to enlist their support and participation in a test of a pre-paid offers/vouchers program. This initiative is part of an ongoing effort at Google to make new products, such as the recent Offer Ads beta, that connect businesses with customers in new ways. We do not have more details to share at this time, but will keep you posted."

Mashable also reports that it has leaned Google will pay the business 80% of what the offer made within three days of the offer ending and hold the other 20% for 60 days to cover any refunds.

Google also made big headlines this week when CEO Eric Schmidt announced he was stepping down as CEO and would be replaced by Larry Page.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Whoops...
By StealthX32 on 1/21/2011 1:44:14 PM , Rating: 5
Bet the GroupOn founder is regretting turning down that $6B offer now...

IPO.

Ha.

Internet bubble was 11 years ago, kid.




RE: Whoops...
By Samus on 1/21/2011 3:45:44 PM , Rating: 2
Dude, seriously!

Seriously.

Groupon is screwed. They can't compete with Google. Should have taken the six billion. They'll be worth nothing in a few years.


RE: Whoops...
By The Insolent One on 1/22/2011 4:13:50 PM , Rating: 3
Groupon and Google are totally different kinds of businesses.

Google is great at promoting online businesses via search
Groupon is great at promoting offline businesses. NO ONE has fully tapped this market yet, and it includes the majority of all the businesses in the world. Microsoft tried to tap the market back in the 90's and couldn't get it right. Groupon has.

Google will not destroy Groupon.
Google will not dominate Groupon's market.

Google is great at search, but search is a market in decline. Don't believe me? Do a search for "Facebook passes Google" and you'll see that Facebook has passed Google for the site with the most traffic. I'm not a fan of Facebook, but the data trumps opinions.

The only service Google developed in house and is now dominant is search. YouTube is dominant in that market for now, but Google only developed it with their checkbook.

Check back here in about a year when Google has some decent numbers to report for their Google Coupon site, and Groupon will be announcing record breaking growth and that they have a 30 billion+ market cap.

It's called evolution, and it's the only constant on the Internet.


RE: Whoops...
By vol7ron on 1/23/2011 11:45:16 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Google is great at search, but search is a market in decline. ... Do a search for "Facebook passes Google" and you'll see that Facebook has passed Google for the site with the most traffic.


First of all "search" is not a market, it's a function - just like you're not a bear, you're retarded. Just because a site gets more hits, doesn't make the initial site any less important or meaningful. The core function of the search engine has increased. Facebook and Google are both marketing companies, where the former is built around social networking and the later is built around a search engine. Both have lots of hits and both hits are increasing year to year.

Your argument is flawed.


RE: Whoops...
By vol7ron on 1/24/2011 9:41:57 AM , Rating: 2
For clarification the bear/retarded thing was an example of two different things, it was not meant as an attack.


Believe it or Not...
By The Insolent One on 1/21/2011 2:41:17 PM , Rating: 2
Google has a very well documented history of having failing products.

Google Wave
Google X
Google Video Player
Google Answers
Google Voice Search
Google Viewer
Jaiku
Dodgeball
Google Offers...?

Just because they enter a market doesn't make them dominant. In fact, the only market that I can remember them entering late and dominating is search. YouTube was bought after it was in hyper-growth mode.

I'm sure there are lots of people smarter and with better memories than I have around here to help, but...Google isn't the end-all-be-all to every market.




RE: Believe it or Not...
By StealthX32 on 1/21/2011 6:48:30 PM , Rating: 3
I agree, Google has taken 2nd best behind many in these submarkets. All you've listed is free services so far, supported by advertisements. The adoption rate is not really dependent on tangibles, just where people go. Of the paid services out there, Google Checkout is a good example (being one of the few non-free services they offer). Google has been able to gain traction relatively easily vs Paypal in the online transaction market, mostly because they're not douchebags that refuse to protect their clientele.

GroupOn expects a $15B valuation upon IPO, based solely on the opinion that they can become the market leader. However, this market isn't free products...far from it, and competition isn't solely based on your end product, costs factor into it as well. For example, right now for a $50 off $100 deal, GroupOn will typically take HALF of the revenue for that deal. So $25 to GroupOn, $25 to the retailer. While it was "hot" in the past year or so, in my opinion, retailers aren't going to pay this in the future. They'll look to cheaper alternatives, and Google has the ability to reduce margins to zero if they wanted to, just to gain market share.

$15B valuation selling gift certificates? Get real.


RE: Believe it or Not...
By xsilver on 1/22/2011 9:46:18 AM , Rating: 2
exactly - small business initially might have been novel on this idea but to ask them to repeatedly come back when groupon wants 50% smells like some sort of amyway ploy.

I was hearing that a lot of business's were finding it hard to break even on these deals because of "deal jumper" customers that would never pay full price after trying the service/products. Then there are the ones that were only weeks/days from bankruptcy anyways so they wont be back.

Heaps of competitors besides google recently has diluted the market as well.


"This is from the DailyTech.com. It's a science website." -- Rush Limbaugh

Related Articles
Eric Schmidt Stepping Down as Google CEO
January 20, 2011, 4:23 PM













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki