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MyFord Touch  (Source: egmcartech.com)
Ford and other automakers' newest technologies will be rated this Thursday when J.D. Power and Associates releases its annual initial-quality study, which is based on consumer opinions

When it comes to in-car communications and entertainment systems, it's no secret that MyFord Touch is the problematic one of the bunchConsumer Reports has said that the system is too complex and distracting due to its lack of tactile buttons and knobs as well as its voice recognition system. In addition, the fact that its screens are partially controlled by two steering-wheel-mounted five-way switches doesn't help its case either. 

Now, auto reviewers aren’t the only ones hating on MyFord Touch, and MyFord Touch isn't the only Ford technology being criticized. Consumers are now throwing in their two cents, and it's not looking favorable for some of Ford's newest technologies.

While not all consumers who have tested MyFord Touch dislike it, many have complained that the system reboots randomly and has trouble responding to voice commands. In addition, some of is features confuse consumers, even though Ford dealerships offer courses on how to use the system. The good news is that many revisions are in development and will be "phased in" over the next year. 

Aside from technical issues, safety advocates worry that the system will distract drivers too easily causing accidents. 

Others have also mentioned problems concerning Ford's PowerShift dual-clutch automatic transmission, which can be found on the 2011 Fiesta and the 2012 Focus. The PowerShift combines two manual transmissions where one clutch controls first, third and fifth gears while the second clutch controls second, fourth and sixth gears. The idea behind the system is to enable more efficient shifting in order to improve fuel economy. 

Despite its best intentions, the system isn't perfect. Consumers have noted that the system overall is "jerky" with unexpected shifts. Also, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration noted that "huge metallic noises" occurred when downshifting at low speeds, and "dangerous gear changes" made the vehicle surge and eventually stall. 

"The Focus is a little slow to find the right gear as you're slowing from 50 miles per hour," said David Champion, director of Consumer Reports' auto test center in East Haddam, Connecticut. 

But Ford spokesman Richard Truett assures that the PowerShift is just a "different type of transmission" that uses actuators and solenoids to change gears electronically, and that it just takes some getting used to. 

"Consumers will hear different sounds and experience different sensations," said Truett. "But that's normal. We chose the PowerShift because it helps deliver outstanding performance and best-in-class 40 miles per gallon fuel economy." 

Ford and other automakers' newest technologies will be rated this Thursday when J.D. Power and Associates releases its annual initial-quality study. The study is based on consumer judgment after 90 days of ownership, and consumers are to point out any problems they encounter.



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Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By cyberguyz on 6/21/2011 8:21:12 AM , Rating: 3
"that the PowerShift is just a "different type of transmission" that uses actuators and solenoids to change gears electronically, and that it just takes some getting used to."

I mean seriously, if consumers are saying they hate it I would think the boffins at Ford would listen to what they are saying.

Ford has been doing well the last few years since the big economy shakeup that bankrupted GM and Chrysler. it really looked like they were getting their act together. I just hope they are smart enough to take these cues from their customers and get back on track.

Combining two manual transmissions with a pair of automatic clutches may sound interesting, but to be honest I think a CVT would have been a lot simpler and cheaper to implement.




RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By inperfectdarkness on 6/21/2011 8:34:41 AM , Rating: 5
again, i think it's a bad implementation thing. evo's use a DCG and it's pure raptor-jesus win.

now i'll grant you that a CVT makes a bit more sense for low-powered vehicles like a festiva. the problem is, CVT's cannot handle more than anemic amounts of power without succumbing to power-transfer losses & premature wear. DCG's are one potential alternative to that problem, and are (thus far) one of the most promising.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By Pessimism on 6/21/2011 9:45:47 AM , Rating: 3
Nissan Murano uses a CVT and it isn't that weak of a vehicle.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By Samus on 6/21/2011 12:02:51 PM , Rating: 5
I still think a CVT is superior to a DSG for most ~100hp vehicles, but it has its limitations with high power applications. The Nisan Murano CVT isn't a true CVT, it works quite differently as it has idler gears. This has the benefit of handling more power and reducing noise, but honestly, doesn't help the fuel economy as it is only in constantly variable mode while accelerating then eventually settles on a gear to coast in. A traditional slushbox torque converter does a similar thing (albeit completely different technology) so the only advantage the CVT offers is consistant engine RPM while accelerating and no shifting (until it idles into a gear, there are 6 selectable gears in the Xtronic2.)

The problem with DSG's is unproven technology. Before you rate me down, let me defend myself. The technology hasn't been mainstream until just 6 years ago, prior to that was VW's Mechatronic used since the 80's but absolutely not known for its reliability. Control modules alone cost $7000. A manual transmission is still more efficient. The only advantage the DSG has is it shifts for you, and not very well. I've been in dozens of cars, a VW R32, Audi A4's, CC's, EVO X's, Fiesta's, etc. They are all incredably jerky, don't know what to do going up or down hill, take forever to downshift more than one gear (overstepping) and do not produce any better fuel economy than a slushbox...because nobody takes advantage of the technology properly. There are currently no STOP START vehicles on the road. Not one. The only reason to have a DSG is for technology like this. DSG's are not high performance like people think, either. Infact VW recalled 14,000 vehicles (all A6's, S-series, and some diesels) because the DSG clutch packs were inadequate for the engine torque output. VW didn't even upgrade the clutchpacks and just messed with the firmware to have it shift different (ie, much slower, almost destroying the car performance according to many people.) My friend has had to replace the clutchpack in his EvoX after 20,000 miles. It cost $6000 and was NOT under warranty. Infact not one manufacturer warranties the clutch on a DSG, but all manufactures warranty every component on an automatic transmission for some length of time/milage. People are being suckered.

I can't believe Ford bet on DSG technology over CVT, especially in their two lowest-powered, lightest weight cars where CVT implementation is ridiculously easy, reliable, and inexpensive.


By superstition on 6/21/2011 3:39:00 PM , Rating: 2
No Stop/Start vehicles in the USA, you mean, eh? Here are just a few examples of UK vehicles with it:

SEAT Ibiza ST 1.2 CR TDI 75PS Ecomotive Man. 5-speed, start-stop, Coupe, 5 door 67.5 MPG US

FORD Focus 1.6 Duratorq TDCi 109PS 5dr Saloon ECO Start-Stop Man. 5-speed: 61.6 MPG US

AUDI A3 1.6 TDI 105PS start-stop Man. 5-speed 61.6 MPG US


By e36Jeff on 6/21/2011 4:23:15 PM , Rating: 2
In terms of start/stop in the US, aside from every hybrid on the market, there is also the BMW M3; M-B CL63, CLS63, and S63; Porsche Cayenne and Panamera. The total list, when you include the hybrids, has 34 vehicles.

And I can't speak for other manufacters, but BMW does cover clutches in both DSG's and manual transmissions. Albeit, its under the clause of 'normal wear and tear,' but from what i've heard they will usualy give you one clutch if you are above 30k-40k miles.


By Adul on 6/21/2011 8:31:04 PM , Rating: 2
Subaru Outback has a CVT with a 170HP engine.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By avxo on 6/22/2011 1:00:33 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
They are all incredably jerky, don't know what to do going up or down hill, take forever to downshift more than one gear (overstepping) and do not produce any better fuel economy than a slushbox...

I have an Audi TT with with the DSG transmission. It's smooth as butter on the highway and just as smooth in town (it's only ever jerky when forcing a downshift from 2nd to 1st). I test-drove a TT-S with 265 hp and it's just as smooth.

quote:
There are currently no STOP START vehicles on the road. Not one.

That's a blatant lie.

quote:
DSG's are not high performance like people think, either. Infact VW recalled 14,000 vehicles (all A6's, S-series, and some diesels) because the DSG clutch packs were inadequate for the engine torque output.


My TT has 211 hp between 4300 and 6000 RPM. It cranks cranks 258 lb-ft of torque between 1600 and 4200 rpm. And gets from 0 to 60 in just over 5 seconds.

Granted that's not super-car like performance, but it's pretty high performance.

It's true that higher-performance models, like the TT-RS and the R8 don't come with a DSG, but clearly such gearboxes are capable of coupling a lot of power. Yet.


By Alexvrb on 6/22/2011 6:07:49 PM , Rating: 2
Your 0-60 time isn't because you have a really powerful engine. It is because the car is sleek and small, relatively light, has lots of gears and reasonably aggressive gearing, with decent power. Strap a DSG to a bigger, heavier model with a nasty engine and watch it break too early and not be covered under warranty and/or maybe they'll release a FREE software update to make it shift gently and reduce your acceleration times.

DSGs have advantages, but I'm just not sure they're appropriate for all vehicles. Conventional MTs and ATs with 6+ gears seem to be pretty good competition, in many cases. I do agree that a lot of it comes down to implementation.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By NullSubroutine on 6/21/2011 11:46:51 AM , Rating: 2
What the hell is a DCG?


By SanLC504 on 6/21/2011 12:11:27 PM , Rating: 2
I think he means Dual-Clutch Gearbox, but usually they are called DSG (Direct Shift Gearbox, Volkswagen) or DCT (Dual-Clutch Transmission).


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By InfinityzeN on 6/21/2011 8:53:17 AM , Rating: 2
Dual clutch transmissions are not exactly new. They are also not an automatic transmission (which uses planetary gears and torque converters), but an automated manual. It will feel like a manual transmission instead of an automatic when driving, because it is a manual transmission.

I do agree that a CVT would be a better choice. Dual Clutch Transmisisons are the realm of high performance vehicles like the GT-R, Ferrari, BMW M3, etc.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By chiadog on 6/21/2011 9:07:42 AM , Rating: 2
It isn't exactly an automated manual. BMW's SMG and Ferrari's F1 shifter are automated manual boxes. DCG are DCGs, with all its faults and unnecessary complex parts. I do not agree that DCG are for high performance cars, as it doesn't handle power quite as well as a real deal manual box, and adds unnecessary weight and points of failure. Sport compacts seems like a more fitting home for these boxes.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 9:38:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I do not agree that DCG are for high performance cars
I would tend to agree..

-Faster shifting
-Can be more fuel efficient
-Less power transfer loss (result of getting away from torque converter/planetar gear sets)

Whats not to like? #2/3 on the list are exactly what you care about in a smaller car..


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By mcnabney on 6/21/2011 10:34:01 AM , Rating: 2
Why would anyone ever buy an automatic tranmission unless they had some form of disability?

Standard transmissions are not hard to use and save tons of money on the purchase as well as maintenance and repairs.


By DanNeely on 6/21/2011 11:25:13 AM , Rating: 3
Why would anyone ever buy a <labor saving device> unless they had some form of disability?

<Less-automated models> are not hard to use and save tons of money on the purchase as well as maintenance and repairs.


By Hieyeck on 6/21/2011 11:58:56 AM , Rating: 2
Welcome to the USA.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By wolrah on 6/21/2011 12:25:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why would anyone ever buy an automatic tranmission unless they had some form of disability?


Because it's faster? Perfect shifts in either direction, performed faster than any human ever with a standard.

When well implemented (as apparently the Ford was NOT, but let's use a VW GTI as an example) the only objective downsides to a DCT are cost and complexity.

Now, subjectively I won't deny that it's just enjoyable to row your own gears, but look at any example ever of a vehicle offered with both DCT and standard, DCT is faster.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 1:32:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
When well implemented (as apparently the Ford was NOT, but let's use a VW GTI as an example) the only objective downsides to a DCT are cost and complexity.
Depends on what you consider implemented correctly. VW (and pretty much everyone else) utilizes a wet clutch system while Ford utilizes a dry clutch system.

Its not suppose to perform on par with a wet clutching system, it is suppose to bring a DCT in price to the levels where it can be used in small and midsized vehicles. Unlike the expensive wet clutch systems that are usually used in torque heavy situations.

They are also usually less complex than wet clutch systems and do not require special transmission lubricants and higher priced synthetic oil to keep them running.

That said, this also kind of ruins your rule of always being faster ;) With a professional driver the 5 speed manual Focus goes from 0-60 in around 7.6, while the 6 speed auto DCT tuned in over 8. Great performance compared to a conventional automatic, but still not yet on par with a manual.

If you were to compare an 8 speed BMW DCT to a manual on the same vehicle, you would probably be correct ;)


By Johnmcl7 on 6/21/2011 8:47:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Depends on what you consider implemented correctly. VW (and pretty much everyone else) utilizes a wet clutch system while Ford utilizes a dry clutch system.


VW use both, the six speed DSG uses wet clutches but the seven-speed uses dry clutches.

John


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By YashBudini on 6/21/2011 1:28:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Standard transmissions are not hard to use and save tons of money on the purchase as well as maintenance and repairs.

I've had zero problems with my auto after 270K miles, only fluid changes. I would have been on my 2nd clutch with a stick by now, if not a third. And even when clutches hold up sometimes the throwout bearing goes bad, high labor costs for a small replacement part.

Lockup torque converters level the playing field for mileage at highway speeds.

Stick shifts make no sense if you do a lot of stop and go driving.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 1:38:04 PM , Rating: 2
You also spent money upfront to get that automatic..

You are also kidding yourself if you don't think these very same 'high labour costs for a small replacement part' issues don't exist for automatics too, if not more..


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By YashBudini on 6/21/2011 1:45:31 PM , Rating: 2
Sure they exist, but I didn't have any.

Larger cars don't come with sticks, economies of scale level the cost playing field.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 1:56:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Sure they exist, but I didn't have any.
I'm sure you could find many manual drivers that would claim the same thing.
quote:
Larger cars don't come with sticks, economies of scale level the cost playing field.
Sure they do, in fact they are kind of making a comeback in recent years with many now equipped with 6 speed manuals. (now of course they are the minority, but they do exist)

Then there are vehicles like Jeeps that buying an automatic would be considered sacrilege and those things last forever!


By YashBudini on 6/21/2011 7:43:58 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Sure they do, in fact they are kind of making a comeback in recent years with many now equipped with 6 speed manuals. (now of course they are the minority, but they do exist)

And on the Acura TL the only way to get a stick is to buy it fully loaded, meaning bigger engine and AWD. Kind of a turnaround from the old days.
quote:
Then there are vehicles like Jeeps...

Let's not address products from Chrysler.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By Reclaimer77 on 6/21/2011 2:02:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Stick shifts make no sense if you do a lot of stop and go driving.


I don't care if it doesn't "make sense", I'm driving a stick.

quote:
I would have been on my 2nd clutch with a stick by now, if not a third.


Unless you "launch" first gear constantly, I call BS on this. There are more people with 270k manuals out there than your automatic, I assure you.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By YashBudini on 6/21/2011 4:45:35 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Unless you "launch" first gear constantly, I call BS on this. There are more people with 270k manuals out there than your automatic, I assure you.

In your neck of the woods sure, but that isn't everything. You go to some city where an hour of repetitive engagements of the clutch, hundreds, to travel a few blocks, are not going to be rewarded with vast lifespans.

Translation - things outside your viewpoint don't necessarily constitute BS.

As usual no middle of the road exists for some people.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By Reclaimer77 on 6/21/2011 6:48:24 PM , Rating: 2
How the hell do you know where I live? Just because I'm Conservative I live in the "woods"? Wtf is this.

I drive in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina all the time. Maybe you've heard of it?

quote:
Translation - things outside your viewpoint don't necessarily constitute BS.


Hypocrite much? Just because YOU have an automatic with 270k on it and supposedly no maintenance doesn't mean your viewpoint is correct.


By YashBudini on 6/21/2011 6:57:55 PM , Rating: 2
Your neck of the woods means not a big city. You had already mentioned you were from NC in the past.

The rest of your assumption came from you, not me. It is just a common expression, "your neck of the woods."

Are you ever not an extremist? Nothing here suggests that. You scream when ad hominem attacks are used on you, but after Moto you do the exacty same thing almost as often. Not my viewpoint, but all actual posts, with little if any digging required.

Ready to flame at a moment's notice.


By YashBudini on 6/21/2011 7:14:49 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
and supposedly no maintenance

Here's yet another example of your emotions being out of control. I clearly stated I did fluid changes, about 8 of them altogether as a matter of fact. So where did you come up with "no maintenance?"

And so my while probably not much lower labor costs than a clutch replacement at least the costs have been spread out over time.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By Samus on 6/21/2011 12:17:20 PM , Rating: 1
I guess you haven't heard practically everybody who beats on their GT-R has destroyed their transmission. Watch youtube, there's a viral video of a virtually new GT-R transmission exploding at a dragrace.

The only car that got it right was the Veyron, probably because the transmission costs $123,200 dollars, is made almost completely out of titanium, and has dual 12" carbon ceramic clutches, simply gigantic. Most DSG transmission CASES aren't even 12" in diameter.

EVO's have the same problem. So do Audi's (who just recalled a shitload of 'performance' vehicles equiped with DSG's only to mess up their firmwares by limiting sharp high RPM shifting.


By Reclaimer77 on 6/21/2011 1:14:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The only car that got it right was the Veyron, probably because the transmission costs $123,200 dollars, is made almost completely out of titanium, and has dual 12" carbon ceramic clutches, simply gigantic. Most DSG transmission CASES aren't even 12" in diameter.


Umm you know most cars don't have over a thousand wheel horsepower right? There's no need to build transmissions to Veyron standards.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By InfinityzeN on 6/21/2011 9:55:04 AM , Rating: 2
Dual Clutch Manuals, twin-clutch gearbox, double clutch transmission, etc etc etc. All different names for the same thing.

What I ment when I said they are far high performance cars is that they were designed for F1, trickled down to Ferrari, then trickled down to other high performance cars. It is only recently that they have started showing up in non-high performance cars.


By chiadog on 6/21/2011 11:50:52 AM , Rating: 2
You may be confused by the semi-auto operations. DCG and automated manuals/semiautomatic operate the same to the driver, but uses different technology underneath. DCGs was introduced in consumer space on the VW then Audis. The Supercars came later since the earliest consumer box can't handle much power. R35 GT-R's DCG box is a joke compared to the old manual Getrag boxes R32-R34 had.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 9:33:29 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I mean seriously, if consumers are saying they hate it I would think the boffins at Ford would listen to what they are saying.
Where have consumers been saying this? I would love for an actual source of more than one person complaining, as I own one of these cars and while I have a manual, the automatic DCT was a great drive, and I had absolutely no problems in the 5-6 extended test drives I took when trying to choose between the two. (and I definitely did not hold back while testing) The only thing I truly did not like is the silly shiftronic setup (or whatever you want to call it), as its just two up and down buttons.

This is also hardly groundbreaking, this is merely a DCT such as what high end Mercedes have in their SUV's. DCT like transmissions are the future (yes I said it, give it 15 years and the torque converter will go the way of the dodo) , and are actually quite cost effective when you consider how much a torque converted based automatic can cost.

Truly if you want consumer backlash, switch everything to a CVT as you state. Feels like riding a large lawnmower..

and FYI: It was also kind of known that the Fiesta DCT's had a little trouble out of the gate, as the Focus does not seem to have some of the same kinks as the very first revision.


By Iaiken on 6/21/2011 10:21:18 AM , Rating: 2
Not just that, but a lot of the jerkiness can be taken out via updates to the engine computer. A computer-controlled throttle body, when coupled with a DCG, allows the computer to blip the throttle at the right moment during a downshift to momentarily bring the RPM's up to match the new gear before it it engaged. This allows for butter-smooth shifting at all RPM ranges and when combined with limitations on when the computer can shift it prevents dangerous surges.

Ford is on the right track, but they still have some work to do.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By Reclaimer77 on 6/21/2011 10:37:32 AM , Rating: 2
Did you read the article? This isn't "one person" randomly saying it.

quote:
Also, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration noted that "huge metallic noises" occurred when downshifting at low speeds, and "dangerous gear changes" made the vehicle surge and eventually stall.


NHTSA, you know, the people who TEST cars for a living? I think that's a little more legitimate than your subjective "extended test drives", don't you think? You don't even own one, you went for the manual. Smart move, by the way.


By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 1:02:03 PM , Rating: 2
As stated, I heard absolutely nothing like what they describe on the focus in particular.

Its well known that the Fiesta (especially the early ones) had transmission issues, and we don't even know for sure what car they were even testing.

I test drive with the windows down and the radio off, just so I can hear these types of things, and I'm pretty sure I would have noticed loud grinding noises.

Just saying...

P.S The manual is a great little car ;) Mine is even the SEL which they don't sell in the US as a manual ;) The result is my car is basically equipped like a full fledged Titanium, aside for the 18" rims. (i.e Ford MyTouch w/ 8 in panel etc)..

As for MyFord Touch, i would tend to agree with most peoples complaints. If it were responsive and worked as it was suppose to 100% of the time, it would be great, unfortunately there are clearly still some issues.

Do note MyFord Touch is not made by MS, but by Ford, and apparently they've recently dumped the developers in charge of the project because of ongoing issues.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By Reclaimer77 on 6/21/11, Rating: -1
RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By JediJeb on 6/21/2011 12:28:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The only thing Ford is good at is making Ranger's and F-150's for uninformed rednecks. Notice they didn't put this trans setup in THOSE.


Funny. Those uninformed rednecks probably buy older trucks so they can actually work on them at home resulting is massive savings in maintenance over the 10+ years they will own them. The really uninformed people out there are the ones that will buy the shiny new thing on the market then spend a fortune keeping it working until they can "upgrade" in a couple years, all the while being stuck in a constant cycle of making perpetual payments and taking a loss on each upgrade.


RE: Easy for a Ford executive to say...
By YashBudini on 6/21/2011 7:09:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Those uninformed rednecks probably buy older trucks so they can actually work on them at home resulting is massive savings in maintenance over the 10+ years they will own them.

So you're saying the old phrase "necessity is the mother of invention" doesn't exist in your world?


By JediJeb on 6/22/2011 11:32:52 AM , Rating: 2
On the contrary, most people I know invent their own ways to keep older vehicles going out of the necessity of not being able to afford the new ones being sold today.


By FaaR on 6/21/2011 7:05:35 PM , Rating: 2
"Consumers" may hate it (bit overexaggerated term, don't you think?), but that doesn't mean they know what the hell they're talking about. People in general are about as intelligent as a bag of rocks.

Maybe they "hate" it for no other, more rational reason than because the dual clutch transmission doesn't feel all slushy and diffuse like a standard automatic, like they're used to - the article doesn't say!

Who are these "consumers" btw? What percentage out of what selection of the total customer base expressed negative opinions? Such details can widely skew results!


The idea of MyTouch isn't the problem
By tayb on 6/21/2011 8:18:45 AM , Rating: 2
It's Ford's lousy implementation. I remember reading some quote describing the MyTouch development along the lines of "two developers sitting behind two separate closed doors working on the same project without any collaboration."

I've used Sync and MyTouch and I did not experience problems but it seems pretty apparent that my brief demo was the exception, not the rule.

Ford also failed miserably with the firmware upgrades. Everyone one of these cars should be able to receive an update OTA. Imagine if you had to go sit in line for two hours to upgrade your iPhone or Android at a Verizon store? Great idea.

Overall I think Ford has the right idea with this they just failed miserably at execution.




RE: The idea of MyTouch isn't the problem
By barich on 6/21/2011 8:23:46 AM , Rating: 2
The lack of tactile feedback from the touch-sensitive controls on some models is a serious problem, along with the same thing on the Chevy Volt. I don't know whose bright idea this was, but while driving I need to be able to find controls by feel, without activating them.


By JediJeb on 6/21/2011 12:40:30 PM , Rating: 2
This exactly. How are you supposed to use a touch screen without looking at it? With the old style buttons Ford used that all had a different profile and texture you could find any control you needed simply by feel while never taking your eyes off the road. Also when these vehicles are 10+ years old, how difficult will it be to keep the system going, will they support it or kill off the old versions like MS does with windows and force a upgrade to something newer that might require a hardware upgrade also?

I don't believe in vehicles being disposable items you buy every 3-5 years, I believe they should be a workhorse durable item that you use until it is totally worn out and that should take at least 10 years.


By inperfectdarkness on 6/21/2011 8:32:07 AM , Rating: 4
it's just ford idrive v. 1.0. ;)


RE: The idea of MyTouch isn't the problem
By crydee on 6/21/2011 9:30:48 AM , Rating: 2
I believe you can download the updates and put them on a usb stick and plug them in and update them yourself.


By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 9:41:16 AM , Rating: 2
Only minor updates, apparently any large ones will require a visit to the dealer. You also need a specific version (may 25th i think) in order to even have the USB update functionality.. (on the Focus at least)


By Manch on 6/21/2011 10:07:55 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, that was a previous DT article that had the two developer comment. It also said how Ford threw out the original code and had an MS affiliate remake it from scratch, and it's disjointed and bloated which is why it seems slower on faster hardware than the previous version.

My brother said he hasnt had any issues with it so far, but that could be since he just picked up the truck a month ago so it probably has the latest firmware. My father hasnt had any issues with his either.

The latest firmware corrections is probably rather large so OTA wouldnt be so great. I dont know about waiting two hours in line, but when I take my cars to the local Ford dealer, I just make an appt.

Hopefully, the next gen will be better. I plan on getting a 50th anniversary mustang when they come out.


If Ford was Smart
By KingofL337 on 6/21/2011 9:07:44 AM , Rating: 2
I Ford was smart they would would add either some flappy paddles to the steering wheel or a +/- to the shifter. That way the driver could shift the car to their liking. I hope Mazda, takes Fords dual-clutch system and makes it (WIN). Then I can get a Miata/RX-9 with a dual-clutch.




RE: If Ford was Smart
By crydee on 6/21/2011 9:21:17 AM , Rating: 2
There is a +/- on the shifter on my SEL automatic.


RE: If Ford was Smart
By JediJeb on 6/21/2011 12:45:31 PM , Rating: 2
Not sure how these thing work but can you skip gears easily or do you have to work through them in sequence? Heck I have a 5 speed in my truck and I rarely use more than 3 gears, can shift 1,3,5 even in traffic most of the time and only use 2 and 4 when hauling something heavy, could you do this with the DCT?


RE: If Ford was Smart
By omnicronx on 6/21/2011 1:17:42 PM , Rating: 2
I'm pretty sure with all DCT systems you can't select the gears selectively, you must go through them in sequence. It depends on the car for how easy it is to perform, some have paddle shifting (BMW's etc) and others like Ford have simple up down buttons on the shifter.

You can't really stay locked into a gear either, the tolerance will be much higher of how high and low you can rev before it will shift for you, but eventually the computer will shift if it feels it needs too.. (same as most conventional tiptronic systems on conventional automatics)


RE: If Ford was Smart
By JediJeb on 6/22/2011 11:30:51 AM , Rating: 2
I think I will stick with a manual transmission then.


Just bought a focus 2012
By crydee on 6/21/2011 9:20:24 AM , Rating: 2
I just bought a new ford focus 2012 SEL hatchback. I don't agree with the article at all. I am pretty savy with tech and pick up on UI's pretty quickly but I think for an entry level car the sync and my ford touch on the car is awesome.

The transmission doesn't bother me at all, but it does feel like driving a manual.




RE: Just bought a focus 2012
By euler007 on 6/21/2011 11:01:15 AM , Rating: 2
"The transmission doesn't bother me at all, but it does feel like driving a manual."

You say that as if it's a bad thing...

I'm dreaming of being able to buy a north american A4 with the 3.0 litre diesel and a DSG.


By jah1subs on 6/21/2011 10:05:34 AM , Rating: 1
I sold VWs for 1 month just before the car market died in 2008. VW has its Tiptronic transmission. From all descriptions, I thought that this new Ford transmission was the same concept. It could be driven like a standard AT when left in Drive or, if the driver pushed the lever to the right, the Driver could control the shifting by using the lever as a a paddle shifter.




By Iaiken on 6/21/2011 10:24:21 AM , Rating: 2
Nope.

Tiptronic is an automatic transmission (uses a torque converter) that allows for user input. Powershift is a dual clutch manual transmission with electronically actuated clutch plates.

Completely different.


System Reboots Randomly
By flybefree on 6/21/2011 8:10:14 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
many have complained that the system reboots randomly

Ahh, Microsoft, how familiar are thee ...




A DSG Owner's Perspective
By cmosentine on 6/21/2011 10:05:49 PM , Rating: 2
OK, lots of talk here but not much in the way of actual owner input. I own a 2008 VW Jetta Wolfsberg that has been chipped to around 240 HP and somewhere around 300 lb-ft torque. The car has a 6 speed DSG transmission. It has a wet clutch.

I will start off by saying the DSG is not perfect, but it is pretty darn good. My biggest gripe has to do with VW's very aggressive ECO settings which keep the engine usually under 2K rpm before shifting. What this leads to is the occasional rough upshift under moderate to heavy throttle at lower rpms. This is exasperated by the extra torque with the chip. Outside of this the tranny is an absolute blast.

Now, VW has had issues. The "Mechtronic" (think electro-mechanical brain) is under a hidden recall for all DSGs made prior to 2009. I had mine replaced which cured a jerky takeoff issue many owners have reported.

And the thing is expensive to service. The fluid and filter must be changed every 40K miles at around $300-$400 at the dealer. In typical German fashion, it is a rather complicated procedure.

To close, I would buy another VW with a DSG.




Auto Insurance
By gracepatterson on 6/22/2011 6:16:18 AM , Rating: 2
Millions of drivers are breaking the law with no insurance because they don't know this about a savings called "Auto Insurance Clearance"




By GatoRat on 6/22/2011 11:48:35 AM , Rating: 2
Everything they describe about the Ford transmission describes my 99 Civic transmission.

Yet, Ford will get the transmission right and eventually everyone will rave about how awesome it is.




Worthless article
By Trisped on 6/24/2011 3:08:55 PM , Rating: 2
While I have had some major objections to articles posted on DailyTech before, I don't think I have every read one where the whole thing seems to be part of a slander campaign.
Who paid you to bad mouth Ford?

The problem is that this article does NOT provide any new FACTS about the Ford My Touch system or customer opinions. Who are these customers that the author is quoting as not liking it? Who surveyed them? Because from the post, the actual results were not even out yet.

So if the whole MyTouch think is stupid and point less what about the clutch? It is a complicated piece of new tech that Ford hasn't worked all the bugs out of yet. It is a good idea, but the implementation needs some work. They probably need another year before they bring it to market, but too late now. Of course the article takes the tone that this is a horrible piece of technology that nobody likes.




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