backtop


Print 20 comment(s) - last by smitty3268.. on Jan 12 at 10:01 PM

Google sets an ambitious mid-2009 release date

Mac and Linux users anxious to run Google’s Chrome browser now have a hard deadline for when that will be possible: the middle of 2009.

“That's what we've been hoping for,” said Chrome product manager Brian Rakowski, in an interview, describing both efforts as proceeding “in parallel” and “at the same level of progress.”

A crude “TestShell” version of the browser is already available on both platforms, but its functionality is minimal at best: the Chromium developer site describes it as a “single-process test harness” for browser development, allowing developers to better debug and test the browser’s page renderer before it is incorporated into Chrome’s famous but difficult-to-debug sandbox architecture.

According to the developer page, Chrome’s Mac and Linux renderer already passes 90% of the “all-important” WebKit layout tests, with outstanding problems in many cases related to text fields.

The weekend also brought news for Chrome’s Windows users: Google released an alpha build of Chrome 2.0 – less than a month after taking Chrome 1.0 out of beta and a few weeks over three months since its surprise release – and it includes a handful of new features, like autocomplete and user profiles, that bring it up to speed with Internet Explorer and Firefox.

More importantly, the Chrome 2.0 alpha supports “user scripts” much like the Greasemonkey plugin for Firefox: users can run custom Javascript code on a per-page basis, allowing customization of nearly any website on the Internet.

“We have user script support. That's a baby step,” said Rakowski. The Chrome development team will “expose more capabilities, then expose containers where can you have your own toolbar-like thing. You'll see it evolve over time.”

User scripts will lay the groundwork for full-blown Firefox-style extensions in the future, as right now the architecture for such a feature is simply not present. An informal CNET user survey, conducted last November, ranks Extensions as the third most requested feature for Chrome – trailing only the desire for Mac/Linux support and “faster performance”.

“Developer preview” versions of Chrome – one of the three update channels that users can subscribe to, with the others builds marked “beta” or the newly-minted “stable” status – will most likely be posted every couple of weeks, said Rakowski, while beta versions of the browser should appear monthly.





Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Yes, please.
By on 1/12/2009 9:28:10 AM , Rating: 2
This sounds promising. Although, I'm hoping they are developing the 64-bit version just as aggresively. My Gentoo partition feels neglected =/.

First.




RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 9:37:46 AM , Rating: 2
Have they cleared up all that junk with Gentoo yet? I used to use Sabayon and it was a mess with how long it took them to update repos and get things implemented. Fedora 10 now, at least their repos are solid, ha.

As a 64-bit user, I do hope they work on the 64-bit as well. Adobe really needs to work on that 64-bit flash, kinda buggy still.


RE: Yes, please.
By PhoenixKnight on 1/12/2009 10:01:03 AM , Rating: 2
It still takes a while for some programs to be marked as "stable" in the portage tree. New programs are usually added soon after release, but you have to unmask them in order to install the newest versions. Admittedly a bit annoying, but the ability to compile all my programs from source specifically for my hardware, with only the features I want, certainly makes up for having to manually unmask stuff.

I would really love a 64-bit Flash player so I don't have to worry about the instability of running a 32-bit one through nspluginwrapper . And I'm still waiting for a 64-bit Photoshop so I can make use of more memory without having to use the stupid scratch disk. You'd think they'd be bright enough to figure making a 64-bit version of a program that routinely uses far more than 3GB of memory.


RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 10:14:23 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
It still takes a while for some programs to be marked as "stable" in the portage tree. New programs are usually added soon after release, but you have to unmask them in order to install the newest versions. Admittedly a bit annoying, but the ability to compile all my programs from source specifically for my hardware, with only the features I want, certainly makes up for having to manually unmask stuff.


Understood, it was really the inner turmoil in the program that was annoying. They didn't have KDE 4.1 while I had Sabayon and it was taking months for them to put it in even after it was clearly stable. Using Sabayon, that was a KDE distro at heart, so I wanted to play with the new stuff. I could have gone through all the hassle of getting it in, but really didn't want to. I could understand the time it takes to get it into Entropy, but Portage should have it immediately and if there are problems, I will be happy to deal with them as they arise. While I like Portage for some things, I really liked being able to chose. If I wanted to compile from source, BAM. If I wanted to browse a package manager, BAM.

quote:
I would really love a 64-bit Flash player so I don't have to worry about the instability of running a 32-bit one through nspluginwrapper .


They have one!! It is just in beta at the moment. The only major bug I get is I have to refresh to get videos to play pretty often. Adobe seems to have an aversion to 64-bit for whatever reason. I really don't like using wrappers for my 64-bit stuff, so I am happy they at least put out that beta.


RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 10:17:27 AM , Rating: 2
http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/flashplayer10/

Sorry, I was incorrect, it is still in alpha. I guess I should cut them more slack on the problems, ha.


RE: Yes, please.
By PhoenixKnight on 1/12/2009 10:53:08 AM , Rating: 2
How well does it work? Are there any major issues aside from having to refresh to get videos to play? I sometimes get a lot of lag due to nspluginwrapper and have to deal with Firefox crashing from it, so any improvement in stability would be great.


RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 11:18:41 AM , Rating: 2
I have run it through a pretty rigorous testing and that seems to be the only issue I get. About the only time I had a real problem was refreshing multiple times and it locked up Firefox. Actually rather than refresh, I have tended to go Back and then reopen the video, as this seems to be less buggy than refresh. Other than that though, it seems to run better than trying to run a wrapper as I feel your pain on that.


RE: Yes, please.
By PhoenixKnight on 1/12/2009 10:46:28 AM , Rating: 2
Well, KDE 4 is still a work in progress and even it's own developers admit that it's not ready for wide adoption yet, since they are still haven't implemented a lot of features that were available in KDE 3.5. I tried KDE 4.0 on Gentoo and found it to be lacking a lot of things I use regularly on KDE 3.

If you're interested in a distro that's very similar to Gentoo, you should check out Arch. It starts with a minimal installation like Gentoo, and has a package manager, pacman, which is similar to portage. Arch uses primarily pre-compiled binaries, but there are plenty of programs that you can compile from source through the package manager, but you can't adjust USE flags. None of the programs in Arch's repos are masked, so you can always use the newest versions of every program. I've never used Arch myself, but I've read up about it a bit and have heard good things from friends of mine who use it.


RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 11:25:25 AM , Rating: 2
4.0 was quite screwy, that I know. 4.1 seems to be quite a bit more stable. I have it side by side with Gnome on Fedora 10. Granted it still isn't where I want it and Fedora KDE support kinda sucks anyway, so I am sticking with Gnome.

Sabayon was a direct branch of Gentoo and had it's own package manager on top of Portage. It still suffered from the internal turmoil of the project. The Gentoo developers are kinda getting lazy and real dickish anytime you point out issues you have. The last time I looked they had a rant from a developer about how they volunteer for it and they aren't going to be able to fix things quickly. I find it odd they would even volunteer if they aren't willing to correct issues with THEIR program.

I love the distro and have gone back to it many times just for that fact. Hell, I have donated money to Sabayon. I really enjoy it and I hope it takes off, but I think they need to break off from Gentoo, they just seem more serious about it than the Gentoo team does.


RE: Yes, please.
By smitty3268 on 1/12/2009 10:01:39 PM , Rating: 2
KDE 4.2 is supposed to be the one that is ready for widespread adoption, and it's coming out later this month. The Gentoo KDE team has decided to use it for stable packages, although it may be a couple months after the release before that happens.


RE: Yes, please.
By phatboye on 1/12/2009 10:57:11 AM , Rating: 2
Clear up what junk? If all you are worried about is KDE 4.1 then yes that whole fiasco has been cleared up as KDE 4.1 is now in the unstable branch of portage.

Fedora 10 might be more up to date but it is just way to unstable for my taste. I don't like being anyone's guinea pig, and that is exactly what fedora users are, Red Hat's guinea pig's for Red Hat Linux. I don't like the idea of Red Hat pushing beta software into it's stable branch as if it was truly stable.


RE: Yes, please.
By on 1/12/2009 11:08:52 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed. There are times where I don't see the need to update certain packages as often, which is why masked packages are marked as such; they are to communicate to the user either instability or merely just a lack of sufficient testing.

As for the flash plugin everyone is talking about, it is a bit unstable. Often I have to refresh the page or restart firefox entirely. It can be time consuming when attempting to access a series of flash objects, but it is manageable.

Has anyone installed 32-bit Firefox and used a 32-bit flash plugin as well, rather than nswrapper on a 64-bit arch?


RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 11:57:56 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Clear up what junk? If all you are worried about is KDE 4.1 then yes that whole fiasco has been cleared up as KDE 4.1 is now in the unstable branch of portage.


There were other things. It became more of a pain than it was worth to wait for them to add something to Portage or try to build it yourself (pain in the ass and buggy). Meanwhile, I could easily grab Fedora or Ubuntu and use whatever is out there with minimal issues. Seems silly to punish myself just for compiling my programs.

If Sabayon breaks off from the Gentoo tree, I will be back in a heartbeat. They were easily my favorite distro, the cutting edge driver support alone was amazing. Short of my keyboard and mouse shortcuts, install of Sabayon was seamless. Compiz, Nvidia drivers, Flash, all that stuff worked right out of the box for me without having to do the usual workarounds. Hell, I still have it running my networking server rack. XFCE and Minicom, wonderfully quick and easy.

Fedora 10 is slightly unstable, I agree. It has always been more of a play around for me, but it seems to be getting better. If I wanted stable and up to date, I would go with Ubuntu, cause they are truly putting Linux where it needs to be. As far as being beta testers though, have to start somewhere, most of Linux feels like being a beta tester if you install anything reasonably new.


RE: Yes, please.
By PhoenixKnight on 1/12/2009 12:17:32 PM , Rating: 2
I've noticed plenty of software available on portage mere hours after release, you simply need to add it to /usr/portage/package.keywords to emerge it. I think Gentoo has recently released easy-to-use LiveCD's for installation, but I haven't tested them out myself, as I prefer using the minimal install CD.

Like I said before, if you like the general idea of Gentoo but want something with up-to-date repos, and the ability to install bleeding edge software, check out Arch Linux. There are plenty of source packages available on Arch if you prefer not to use binaries. From what I hear, their developers are also much more involved in the project than Gentoo's. I'm happy with Gentoo for the time being, but if the distro really starts going downhill, I'll likely jump ship over to Arch.


RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 12:28:23 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I've noticed plenty of software available on portage mere hours after release, you simply need to add it to /usr/portage/package.keywords to emerge it. I think Gentoo has recently released easy-to-use LiveCD's for installation, but I haven't tested them out myself, as I prefer using the minimal install CD.


Yea, some of it moves right in without issue, other things take forever. I just don't think the Gentoo developers give a damn anymore, so it is probably time to jump ship.

Just checking, it seems Sabayon 4.0 is out, I might be killing Fedora, ha. I just can't resist their distro, everything about it kicks Gentoo's ass.

http://sabayonlinux.org/

If you are interested and I might have to look into Arch. I need to build another PC to play with this stuff, ha.


RE: Yes, please.
By PhoenixKnight on 1/12/2009 12:51:32 PM , Rating: 2
I've got an old PC that I need to do a reinstall of Gentoo on, so I might try out Sabayon on it instead. It's not an important enough PC to be worth my time to bother with the trouble of starting from a minimal install and working from there.

I've still got 2 unused partitions on my main computer (out of 18 or so total) to use to test out potential future operating systems. I'm tempted to try test OpenSolaris or FreeBSD on one.


RE: Yes, please.
By Gzus666 on 1/12/2009 12:57:41 PM , Rating: 2
OpenSolaris is OK, but when I tried it their package tree was terribly small. It was very stable though. Granted it could have changed a bunch since I played with it, I grabbed it when it first came out to attempt to run my network server. I got sick of dicking with it cause I needed it working. It really feels like a business only type of OS, at least when I used it. I couldn't get Minicom to compile correctly and really didn't have time to make it work.

I have never played with FreeBSD, so we are in the same boat there. Might have to fiddle with it some day.


RE: Yes, please.
By wvh on 1/12/2009 8:38:12 PM , Rating: 2
Let's hope Google's efforts deliver a more stable experience than Flash on Linux, which so far has not been great (but improving, I admit).

I'm still surprised it takes this long to come up with a suitable Linux version... I understand they might need to think for a while about the GUI and other libraries they would like to use, but the framework itself surely can't be that different from the Windows version. Firefox runs on many platforms without too much trouble, although I guess the whole XUL interface makes porting easier.

Perhaps Google could attract some open-source folks to help out with developing the Linux/*BSD?/Mac OSX version.


Just for clarification...
By TheHarvester on 1/12/2009 11:21:05 AM , Rating: 3
What exactly is the "user script" idea compared to firefox's add-ons? Is this opening the door to -all- add-ons/applications whatever or only certain ones that utilize html compiling and whatnot?




Say what?
By gstrickler on 1/12/2009 1:42:51 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
According to the developer page, Chrome’s Mac and Linux renderer already passes 90% of the “all-important” WebKit layout tests, with outstanding problems in many cases related to text fields.

WebKit originated on MacOS X, is used in Safari and several other browsers. Why would getting WebKit working on the Mac be an issue?

Is this related to the "sandboxing" that Chrome does or is someone at Google smoking something and not sharing it?




"This week I got an iPhone. This weekend I got four chargers so I can keep it charged everywhere I go and a land line so I can actually make phone calls." -- Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg
Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2015 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki