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Vineet Nayar, CEO of HCL Technologies, a major Indian partner of Microsoft, has delivered controversial remarks, labelling American tech graduates as "unemployable", Mr. Vinyar says the American graduates lack the discipline and effort to design quality products and are too expensive to train, and went on to suggest that technology graduates from India, China, and Brazil are better prepared for the market.  (Source: WSJ)
The CEO of a major Indian corporation sounds off on what he sees as educational inadequacies

HCL Technologies is one of India's most powerful and respected tech firms.  The company scored a massive $170M USD outsourcing contract from Microsoft last year.  Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer lavished them with praise, stating, "That extra mile walk by the team (at HCL) has increased our mutual trust and has taken our relationship to newer heights. "

Now HCL's CEO Vineet Nayar has gone on record with some controversial remarks about the quality of American technology college graduates.  Tired of hearing stereotypes about Indian tech grads, Mr. Nayar, speaking before an audience of business partners in New York City, blasted American tech grads as "unemployable". 

He elaborated that he views American tech grads as inferior to those from India, China, and Brazil as the Americans only want to "get rich" and dream up "the next big thing".  He says students from countries like India, China, and Brazil are more willing to put the effort into "boring" details of tech process and methodology, such as ITIL, Six Sigma, etc.

Mr. Nayar also complains about the cost of training Americans.  He says that most Americans are simply "too expensive" to train.  He compares this to Indians, which he says are highly trained, thanks to exhaustive vocational training programs which are used to supplement traditional college education.

Many have taken offense at Mr. Nayar's rhetoric.  Information Week's Robert Preston comments, "Imagine if the CEO of a U.S.-based tech company marched into Mumbai seeking a bigger share of the country's multibillion-dollar market and declared the locals to be unemployable and untrainable. A culture of innovation isn't inconsistent with one that values attention to detail."

Ultimately, the ill-considered speech may be more the result of reverse-stereotyping, and less out of true malice.  Nonetheless, it's indicative of the tensions between U.S. and India over outsourcing and prejudices that still unfortunately exist in the international tech community.




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