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Print 23 comment(s) - last by Reclaimer77.. on Aug 24 at 11:00 AM

BlackBerry says that the PassPort's 1440x1440 display is perfect for medical professionals

You may not typically think of using a smartphone for displaying medical x-rays, but BlackBerry today is championing its upcoming Passport smartphone as a perfect sidekick for just that task.
 
BlackBerry’s Donny Halliwell says that the 4.5” square screen (1440x1440 resolution) is perfect for viewing large documents and provides great clarity in detail that can be shared with patients. Halliwell qualifies that he isn’t a doctor, yet still goes on to say, “I suspect having a clear view of the situation is key in reaching the correct diagnosis. In fields, where decisions can be a matter of health or safety, seeing the whole picture in detail is invaluable.”
 
But, you’re still looking at a [relatively small] 4.5” screen, and BlackBerry devices aren’t exactly brimming with applications and hardware accessories that support the medical field (Apple’s iPhone leads in that department).

 
Back in early July, BlackBerry also took its blog to extol the benefits of the Passport’s unorthodox design, stating that is a “marriage of form and function with a rhyme and reason to it.”
 
BlackBerry is ramping up its efforts on educating the public about its smartphone prowess, and in late June launched the Fact Check Portal to smack down rumors and falsehoods spread by its competitors and the media. However, the company is going to need more than a Fact Check Portal and devices like the Passport to combat it current 0.5 percent market share in the global smartphone market.

Source: BlackBerry



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Diagnosis on Mobile...
By CyCl0n3 on 8/22/2014 8:52:18 AM , Rating: 5
I am a doctor and i would never do a final diagnosis on any mobile device which is not build and developed and certified for the solely purpose of a medical diagnosis. Especially on X-Rays or CT slides you need some decent amount of screen real estate to see the propper details independently from the screen resolution. Even if the screen has a 4K resolution it would not matter because your eyes cant see the fine details on such a small screen, which are needed for the majority of the diagnoses. Dont even get me started with calibration of the screen and the need for dynamic contrast and brightness adjustability.

*facepalm*




RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By melgross on 8/22/2014 9:53:02 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, super high rez on phones is a marketing ploy, having nothing to do with what we can actually see. These resolutions of 400-500 ppi mean nothing without a magnifying glass, even though some will always claim to see a difference.


RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By retrospooty on 8/22/2014 10:28:29 AM , Rating: 2
It depends on your close range (as in 10-15 inches) eyesight. People with good eyes can easily see the quality difference from the low 300's to the low 400's. I can see it. 400-500? No so much.


RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By melgross on 8/22/2014 11:42:35 AM , Rating: 2
No you can't. Unless you're using one of those terrible PenTile based OLED screens, where the stated Rez is much higher than the actual Rez, you can't. You might want to think you can, but lots of people claim to be able to do things they can't.


RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By retrospooty on 8/22/2014 12:34:23 PM , Rating: 2
Yes you can. I can, and many others can as well. If you cant tell the quality difference from say a 300-330 PPI phone to a 400-450 PPI phone at 12 inches, you have an issue with your near term vision period.


RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By retrospooty on 8/22/2014 12:39:47 PM , Rating: 2
BTW, there have been studies done. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retina_Display

"Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies, has challenged Apple's claim. He says that the physiology of the human retina is such that there must be at least 477 pixels per inch in a pixelated display for the pixels to become imperceptible to the human eye at a distance of 12 inches "

You can google your own results.
"if you have better than 20/20 eyesight, then at one foot away the iPhone 4S's pixels are resolved. T he picture will look pixelated ."


RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By melgross on 8/22/2014 7:39:59 PM , Rating: 2
I know about those reports. In theory, it's possible, but in reality? No. I don't care what some people claim, it's just not possible.

I ran a commercial photo labe for almost thirty years. I'm pretty familiar with resolution of prints, and devices


RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By retrospooty on 8/23/2014 7:57:52 AM , Rating: 2
When I look at 2 fairly good quality non-pentile LCD's, an iPhone 5s (326 PPI) and an LG G2 (423 PPI) side by side and I can clearly see the quality difference, images are sharper, text looks clearer. More importantly, I am telling you I can clearly make out individual pixels on the iPhone 5s. You are saying I am imagining it or a liar, along with the millions of others that can see it? Even the initial "retina" claim from Apple is for 20/20 vision, which is NOT perfect vision, it is "AVERAGE" vision.

You are saying doctors that specialize in it are all wrong?

http://mostly-tech.com/2013/11/08/debunking-the-re...

Even Mac fan sites ?
http://www.cultofmac.com/173702/why-retina-isnt-en...

Here is what is happening here... YOU cant see the difference therefore you say there is none. Sorry, it's there.


RE: Diagnosis on Mobile...
By Reclaimer77 on 8/24/2014 11:00:06 AM , Rating: 2
If you ran a lab for 30 years, that probably puts you in your 50's or older. Yes?

Sorry to say this, but your eyesight isn't what it used to be.


Wow, the new BB can display a picture!!
By callmeizzy on 8/21/2014 5:28:05 PM , Rating: 4
How amazing. I guess no other phone can do that.

If my doctor has a BB, then it is time to get a new doctor!




RE: Wow, the new BB can display a picture!!
By retrospooty on 8/21/2014 5:29:22 PM , Rating: 2
LOL Blackberry - http://imgur.com/swPwmY7


RE: Wow, the new BB can display a picture!!
By Samus on 8/21/2014 5:49:43 PM , Rating: 2
I can't believe they're serious about that keyboard. It has no punctuation keys or numbers!? How do you type an email address, end a sentence or put a comma?


RE: Wow, the new BB can display a picture!!
By GTVic on 8/21/2014 5:55:15 PM , Rating: 2
Typical... How about spending 5 seconds reading up on the phone before making an inaccurate comment like this?


RE: Wow, the new BB can display a picture!!
By Samus on 8/22/2014 12:30:32 AM , Rating: 1
Typical... some moron thinks I'm referring to a not even pictured virtual keyboard on a device with a physical keyboard. How about spending 5 seconds processing my statement on the phone before making an inaccurate commend like this?


By GTVic on 8/22/2014 5:46:39 PM , Rating: 3
Blame the picture, that is brilliant. Next time I see a car without the hood open I will assume it doesn't have an engine.


By shabby on 8/21/2014 10:03:33 PM , Rating: 3
A 4th virtual row of keys appears on screen when you start typing that includes those missing keys. Strange that they didn't think of a long press/2nd function for the current keys, i mean who expects a comma/period above the keyboard?


By Nortel on 8/21/2014 10:16:14 PM , Rating: 2
Virtual on screen but yes... It certainly looks like there is plenty of room for a whole 'nother row of keys...


Do some research
By Wizec on 8/22/2014 10:39:54 AM , Rating: 2
BlackBerry has actually partnered with a large health care IT provider, NantHealth, (http://nanthealth.com/about-us/careers/opportuniti... and have tailored the PassPort to specific needs in the medical industry. They are aware that doctors and dentists need contrast controls, etc. for proper x-ray analysis. They are also aware that BlackBerry has a presence in _every_ hospital today (also every Internet backbone router) through their QNX operating system and a device such as the PassPort can integrate with them more seamlessly than any other platform.

You might also be interested to learn that India's Digit Magazine (largest selling IT magazine in India) just named BlackBerry 10.2 as the world's best mobile OS: http://www.digit.in/mobile-phones/the-worlds-best-...




RE: Do some research
By CyCl0n3 on 8/22/2014 11:29:41 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
...and have tailored the PassPort to specific needs in the medical industry.


If they would have done this, than the PP wouldnt be 4,5".
You just cant do any reliable diagnosis on a small phone screen. Period.
You loose all correlation to size, morphology and shades on that screen with that size. There is a reason those medical screens cost 2-4K $. For example the Independent Sub Pixel Drive. If i could do my diognosis reliable on a phone i would sit on the bahamas and drink my virgin mojito meanwhile.
And the keyword is reliability! A diagnosis is worth nothing if its not reliable and comparable.


RE: Do some research
By Wizec on 8/22/2014 1:12:05 PM , Rating: 2
Nowhere have they claimed this device is for diagnostics. The "specific need" we are talking about is a portable converged device smaller than a tablet that can be used for referencing (say between specialties) but particularly patient consultation, after diagnoses have been done on the very equipment you reference.


What?
By melgross on 8/22/2014 9:49:36 AM , Rating: 2
This is nonsense. Typical Blackberry BS. Screens for x-rays need to not only have high Rez, but also the ability to see details that are very close in contrast. In fact, that's one of the most important requirements for viewing x-rays digitally.

What evidence is there that this screen meets those requirements? Blackberry throws out a lot of garbage, hoping that some of it will be believed. So far, other than for fanboys of Blackberry, no one does believe them. That's why sales are down 78% YoY.

This oddly shaped phone seems to have been invented in a meeting where all the people were sitting with their heads in their hands, moping about what they would do next, as all their products have failed to take off. One guy thinks about making something totally different, and they all perk up. The Passport is the result.

So far, I've read very little that's favorable about this thing. So now, they're attempting to find some use for it—any use, rational or not.




RE: What?
By Wizec on 8/22/2014 2:00:37 PM , Rating: 2
You're mis-informed. This is a device that was planned in partnership with a Health Care IT provider - NantHealthCare.

http://nanthealth.com/press-releases/blackberry-in...

A targeted device, the exact opposite of what you have speculated:

http://www.ubergizmo.com/2014/04/blackberry-and-na...

The display specs are:

4.5" diagonal, 1440 x 1440 resolution, LCD, 453 DPI, 24-bit color depth, 1:1 aspect ratio, RGB pixel arrangement, In-cell touch panel, 10-point multi-touch, Corning Gorilla Glass 3

They combine these features with an app called "Nil" which has the following features:

• Diagnostic viewer with advanced capabilities
• 2D, multi-planar reformatting (MPR)
• 3D and echocardiology with full cine.
• Window/level, zoom, pan, rotate and related features enable comprehensive image manipulation
• Integrate with DICOM network or EMR/EHR systems

Here’s why it’s designed to look amazing on the BlackBerry Passport:

• Interactive viewing of 2D/3D imaging records easier on larger, high pixel-density screen
• Touch-enabled keyboard makes image manipulation fast, easy, and accurate
• Maximizes productivity/collaboration among care team
• High capacity battery designed to last all-day

http://blogs.blackberry.com/2014/08/passport-xray/


Of Course
By Gunbuster on 8/22/2014 8:13:07 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, because your doctor performing a diagnosis on his blackberry (while at the bar or home getting a BJ?) using a consumer device screen with no color calibration is an awesome way to market your product.




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