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Print 10 comment(s) - last by BifurcatedBoat.. on Jul 15 at 8:05 PM

It's not clear why the two execs left, but BlackBerry reportedly asked them both to stay and tried to find ways to keep them onboard

BlackBerry hasn't had the easiest year so far, and it doesn't look like things are getting any easier -- the company just lost two top executives. 

According to The Wall Street Journal, T.A. McCann, vice president of all social networks at BlackBerry, and Marc Gingras, founder of social-calendar company Tungle.me (which was acquired by BlackBerry in 2011), both left the company in recent weeks. 

Both executives held very important roles at BlackBerry. McCann developed and managed social apps for BlackBerry such as Twitter, Facebook and even BlackBerry Messenger (BBM).

Gingras, on the other hand, was in charge of the calendar, contacts and BlackBerry Hub for messaging. 

It's not clear why the two execs left, but BlackBerry reportedly asked them both to stay and tried to find ways to keep them onboard. 

McCann and Gingras aren't the first executives to walk this year. Richard Piasentin, BlackBerry's vice president for sales in the U.S., was terminated just last month.


On top of that, BlackBerry recently said it will make more cuts across middle management in the sales and support departments as part of its restructuring process. 

BlackBerry released its new BlackBerry 10 (BB10) operating system earlier this year in hopes of turning things around for the sinking company, but its major device releases -- such as the Z10 and Q10 -- haven't exploded in popularity like the company had hoped. 

For Q2 2013, BlackBerry posted a loss of $84 million USD ($0.13 per share) while analysts at Thomson Reuters expected a profit of about $39 million USD ($0.06 per share). BlackBerry also disappointed when it came to revenue with $3.1 billion USD (analysts expected $3.4 billion USD).
 
To make matters worse, BlackBerry only sold 2.7 million BB10 devices during the quarter, when analysts expected over 3.5 million. 

At the company's annual shareholders meeting earlier this week, investors wanted answers as to why BB10 hasn't taken off. One even called the Z10 launch a "disaster," but BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins said it was the fault of carriers who only promote sales of top guns like the iPhone and Android-powered Samsung Galaxy phones. 

Source: The Wall Street Journal



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Wrong answer
By Dug on 7/12/2013 11:43:26 AM , Rating: 2
"CEO Thorsten Heins said it was the fault of carriers who only promote sales of top guns like the iPhone and Android-powered Samsung Galaxy phones."

Most phones are sold by word of mouth, reviews, etc. Not a carrier pushing it. If you made a top gun phone in the first place instead of playing catch up, then you wouldn't have to worry about it. I say it's time to remove the CEO.




RE: Wrong answer
By OoklaTheMok on 7/12/2013 12:20:21 PM , Rating: 2
I think word of mouth and reviews generally only applies to the technically savvy consumer.

I don't believe the average consumer shops with as much authority, and therefore relies on the salesmanship or promotions of the carrier to direct them towards the device that they should buy. The problem is that it is in the carriers best interest to sell the consumer the device that gives the carrier the best ROI, not the consumer.

This is one of the reasons why Android is so popular with carriers, because Google gives the carrier a cut of sales on Google Play. The iPhone was such a great deal for carriers because it brought in a lot of new smartphone customers who were willing to pay premium prices. The same could be said for Android as well with regard to bringing in new smartphone customers, but not so much on the premium pricing model though.


RE: Wrong answer
By Moishe on 7/12/2013 12:27:02 PM , Rating: 1
You're dead on. When WP7 came out I happened to be looking for a new phone. The guys in the retail stores would not even talk about phones other than Android or iPhone. It wasn't just because the alternative offerings were fewer. I like to consider options, not just blindly pick the popular stuff, and they did all they could to talk me away from anything alternative.

RIM didn't market well, neither did they bet their last dime and offer carriers incentives to sell the devices.


RE: Wrong answer
By Moishe on 7/12/2013 12:21:52 PM , Rating: 2
He's not entirely wrong in the sense that the carriers sell phones that they like or that pay them more.... but it's a terrible cop-out on his part because RIM could have made a more compelling device and they could have promoted the device better.

Either way, they need BB10 devices to win, not just do OK, and clearly they have been unable to make a marketing push that does that.


Comment
By GTVic on 7/12/2013 7:08:02 PM , Rating: 3
Most of these type of blog entries and comment posts are FUD as far as determining how well the new BB phones are doing.

If you read experiences of people that actually use the phones, they work really well and they are catching on.




RE: Comment
By retrospooty on 7/12/2013 8:31:17 PM , Rating: 2
"If you read experiences of people that actually use the phones, they work really well and they are catching on."

Well, you are half right. It is a good OS, and a well built phone. The problem is catching up to where the top 2 were last year isnt enough to spur anyone to switch. It is a good OS, but it isnt catching on in any significant #'s, and there is plenty proof of that. See Mr's Heinz own #'s released a few weeks ago. BB is in some real deep trouble here.


Fatal mistake
By DukeN on 7/12/2013 3:50:15 PM , Rating: 2
The real fault IMO was not launching in the US the same time BB10 was launching in the rest of the world.

Of course if they had apps they could've done better but too much cluelessness to overcome.




The Phone is just not that appealing
By vcolon on 7/14/2013 2:48:13 AM , Rating: 2
Work for a Major US cell carrier. Over 30% returns. Not because the phone does not work, but because people, primarily Crackberry users, did not like the experience. Just my 2 cents.




Leaving because
By Uncle on 7/14/2013 4:43:29 PM , Rating: 2
"It's not clear why the two execs left, but BlackBerry reportedly asked them both to stay and tried to find ways to keep them onboard" A year ago Blackberry paid certain executives a bonus to stay until the roll-out of the new phones. Nothing major, they have done their job and are leaving.




By BifurcatedBoat on 7/15/2013 8:05:24 PM , Rating: 2
I think that's the critical question that they need to figure out an answer to. If there's no compelling reason to choose Blackberry, then they are not going to be successful.




"Folks that want porn can buy an Android phone." -- Steve Jobs














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