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  (Source: Trolls News)
Unable to compete, the Cupertino company claims that Google and Samsung stole features from Siri

Given that the massive Galaxy S IV doesn't look too much like the much smaller 4-inch iPhone 5, Apple Inc. (AAPL) is having to turn to new and creative routes to try to convince federal judges and juries to ban its competitor’s flagship product.

I. Apple Targets Samsung Again

Samsung is doing quite well with the Galaxy S IV, moving 10 million units in a mere four weeks.  Overall Samsung is outselling Apple 2-to-1 in unit sales.  In addition, Samsung is approaching Apple in profitability for the first time; while Apple has seen its own profit margins slide for the first time in years.

Thus it is perhaps expected that Apple would be return to its favorite tactic -- looking to troll Samsung in court.

Galaxy S IV
The Samsung Galaxy S IV

Its latest accusation is that Google Inc.’s (GOOG) Android "Google Now" service violates five invention claims that Apple has patented, with respect to its Siri voice search/assistant that it co-designed with Nuance Communications Inc. (NUAN).

The patents asserted are:

13-05-21 Apple Motion to Amend Infringement Contentions



But wait, you say, what could patents filed at least four years before Siri was released (or ten or more years in most cases) have to do with Siri or Google Now?  And what in the world do graphical user interface patents (the latter two patents from the 90s) have to do with voice search?

II. Apple Looks to Use Ambiguous Decade-Old Patents Against Samsung

Apple contends that the trio of initial patents -- which cover interaction with ambiguous data constructs -- can be applied to Siri, Google Now, (or likely most other pieces of software).  And Apple says its equally ambiguous UI "inventions" are fair game, as Google Now is activated by an on-screen button at times, replacing the previous "Android Quick Search Box".

According to a filing obtained by Florian Mueller, an anti-Google blogger paid by Google's legal rivals, Apple writes, "The Galaxy S4 product practices many of the same claims already asserted by Apple… in the same way as the already-accused Samsung devices."
 

Unable to compete, Apple is helping the courts lend it a helping hand in its war against Samsung. [Image Source: Cult of Mac]
 
Judge Paul S. Grewal of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California will rule on Apple's request to tack on the patents at a June 25 hearing.  

As Samsung and Apple wind up to a second trial, in which Apple is targeting dozens of Samsung smartphones and tablets for bans, the Cupertino company is watching its first $1.05B USD court win over Samsung start to unravel with a pair of patent invalidations by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).  Apple also failed to secure any lasting bans on current Samsung products in that case.

Sources: AppleInsider, Scribd



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Typical Apple strategy
By BurnItDwn on 5/22/2013 3:20:11 PM , Rating: 5
I believe Apple's strategy involves
1.) Always be bad for consumers (don't use industry standard connectors and such, make it hard to fix or replace parts)
2.) Do not ever compete on a level playing field

That has worked for apple for quite few years, however, they are less fashionable as of late, and since they have only succeeded by being fashionable, this means their downfall and inevitable doom.




RE: Typical Apple strategy
By Nortel on 5/22/13, Rating: -1
RE: Typical Apple strategy
By xti on 5/22/13, Rating: 0
RE: Typical Apple strategy
By Nortel on 5/22/2013 3:59:25 PM , Rating: 2
I feel the same way with cables. When I buy a TV, I'm not complaining that it didn't come with a HDMI cable. When you buy a Mac, you wont necessarily require a Thunderbolt cable and if you do, just buy one.

As for batteries, I have a battery case for my iPhone 5 which I slip on if I'm running low but I'm sure I could just charge the phone at work. It's helped me out on a few occasions though.

Screen size is all relative and subject to opinion. If Apple offered the iPad Mini with full cellphone capabilities, people would be up in arms with it being 'too big to be a phone'. The Note 2 is pretty large and lots love it but some people think the iPhone 5 is too big. To each their own.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By Mitch101 on 5/23/2013 10:50:43 AM , Rating: 2
Guess its time to play chopsticks
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86JMcy5OqZA


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By retrospooty on 5/23/2013 10:53:24 AM , Rating: 2
ROFL... Awesome ad.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By DT_Reader on 5/23/2013 1:41:52 PM , Rating: 3
The difference is that if you need an HDMI cable for your TV you can get one anywhere, even the supermarket. If you need a Thunderbolt cable there's only one place to get it, and you'll pay 2-3 times what it's worth as a result of that exclusivity.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By xti on 5/23/2013 2:03:12 PM , Rating: 2
uh...you know you can get thunderbolt and pretty much any cable cheap and decent quality at monoprice.com right?


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By amanojaku on 5/22/2013 4:01:49 PM , Rating: 5
Prior to Lightning, Apple used that weird 30-pin connector on its phones and tablets. And FireWire, while not exclusive to Macs, never made a dent in a market that was already using USB. Most people don't understand Apple's reluctance to enhance currently used technology like everyone else does. My new PC has USB 3 ports, which accept my USB 1 and 2 devices, no problem. It also has SATA 3, which accept SATA 1 and 2. Apple doesn't believe in backwards compatibility, even with its own technology.

As to user replaceable hardware, Apple was among the first companies to start the trend of being unable to do your own upgrades or repairs. That goes against the ideology of technology: if you're capable, you should be able to do it yourself. Which is why so many do-it-yourselfers don't buy Apple products.

As to that trade off, that's BS. Other companies have no problem creating removable batteries in thin phones. Look at Samsung's Galaxy S4.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By Shadowself on 5/22/2013 4:34:54 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
And FireWire, while not exclusive to Macs, never made a dent in a market that was already using USB.
This was due to Apple's initial licensing policy. It was (IIRC) a minimum of $5,000 for a base license plus $1.00 for each connector. This meant that if you wanted to build a Firewire cable you had to pay Apple $2.00 (two connectors on the cable) plus the initial fee. Back in 1990 when Firewire started that was a truly asinine fee -- and still would be today!

quote:
Most people don't understand Apple's reluctance to enhance currently used technology like everyone else does. My new PC has USB 3 ports, which accept my USB 1 and 2 devices, no problem. It also has SATA 3, which accept SATA 1 and 2. Apple doesn't believe in backwards compatibility, even with its own technology.
Actually, even Firewire was updated. It started out in 1990 as a link that topped out at 50 Mbps. The next generation jumped to 400 Mbps maximum -- with the same connector. The IEEE committee made the move to a different connector when they went to the 800/1600 Mbps version even thought they kept that connector when they finally went to 3200 Mbps over copper. (And Just FYI, Firewire did 3200 Mbps over copper many, many years ago -- shortly after it was picked up as an IEEE standard.) You can go back even further with things like NUBUS being updated and backwardly compatible. Even the 30 pin connector transport stream for the iDevices got updated along the way, but most people (especially the users) never noticed.

The problem is that when Apple makes a jump from one connector to another it either has no apparent reason to do so or does an extremely poor job in explaining to users why they've made the change.

quote:
As to user replaceable hardware, Apple was among the first companies to start the trend of being unable to do your own upgrades or repairs.
Apple has long been a proponent of the computer being an appliance. The original Mac back in 1984 was not designed to be opened or modified in any way. You could add an extra external 400 kB floppy drive, but other than that it was not modifiable. Hell, it didn't even come with an extended keyboard! So the "trend" at Apple started 30 years ago. No one should be surprised that the latest Apple products are not designed to be modified by end users. If your taste (like mine) is to have a product that is configurable by the end user then stay away from certain Apple products.

Apple extending this 30+ year design philosophy to iDevices should be pretty obvious to anyone who has even given a glance to Apple over the years. If you like Apple's philosophy, buy their stuff. If you don't, then don't.

quote:
As to that trade off, that's BS. Other companies have no problem creating removable batteries in thin phones. Look at Samsung's Galaxy S4.
It's not 100% BS. A removable battery inherently weights more or has lower capacity. The removable cover on the phone inherently weighs more or is less rigid. There are tradeoffs. Are those tradeoffs enough to cause you to buy one phone over the other? That's a matter of personal choice.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By Tony Swash on 5/23/13, Rating: -1
RE: Typical Apple strategy
By othercents on 5/22/2013 3:36:22 PM , Rating: 5
You missed one:

3.) Steal technology and patent it, so you can sue others for the use of that technology.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By retrospooty on 5/22/2013 5:45:26 PM , Rating: 5
That needs to be #1. They REALLY excel at that.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By BRB29 on 5/23/2013 8:12:06 AM , Rating: 2
To be fair, Samsung steals technology too but they don't sue people. They get sued instead lol.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By testerguy on 5/23/13, Rating: -1
RE: Typical Apple strategy
By theapparition on 5/23/2013 10:08:19 AM , Rating: 5
Honestly, do you think Motorola and Samsung would be doing that if not for Apple's crusade against them.

Now also be honest. Do you think most of Apple's patents should have even been granted in the first place?

Either way, you can't deny these actions are hurting consumers. Let the market decide.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By xti on 5/23/13, Rating: 0
RE: Typical Apple strategy
By testerguy on 5/24/2013 2:45:28 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
do you think Motorola and Samsung would be doing that if not for Apple's crusade against them.


Actually, Motorola sued Apple before Apple sued Motorola.

I'm not sure who started between Samsung and Apple - but they were both definitely suing each other long before any 'crusade' became popular knowledge.

You're ignoring Samsung doing something worse than Apple just because you have a preference.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By retrospooty on 5/24/2013 12:12:40 PM , Rating: 2
"Actually, Motorola sued Apple before Apple sued Motorola."

"Actually", it all happened in the same month, Oct. 2010 and even though Motorola filed a few weeks ahead of Apple it was a preemptive strike, as Apple had already informed Motorola they were going to be sued several months earlier. I am "actually" sure you already knew that though and you are just purposely spreading your BS as usual.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By testerguy on 5/28/2013 9:47:16 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
"Actually", it all happened in the same month, Oct. 2010


This is irrelevant to and does not change anything about my factual statement. Motorola sued first.

quote:
even though Motorola filed a few weeks ahead of Apple it was a preemptive strike,


Officer, I thought he would punch me so I punched him first. Therefore I am not guilty of punching someone.

You're so blinded by your Apple hate it's ridiculous.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By retrospooty on 5/29/2013 3:08:46 AM , Rating: 2
None of it changes the fact that this is Apples BS patent fight and they announced they would sue first. On another hand there is that whole thermonuclear BS comment and the seedy and totally hippocritical moves behind it (its only OK when Apple copies). BTW I don't hate Apple. I hate loser asses on the internet that feel the need to defend every step any company takes and every product they make.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By ie5x on 5/24/2013 3:58:30 AM , Rating: 2
RE: Typical Apple strategy
By Kiffberet on 5/23/2013 7:30:17 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Always be bad for consumers


I dropped my iphone 4 in the pool. Took it to an Apple store to get a 'damage assessment' report so I could make an insurance claim.
The guy in the shop just replaced the phone with a brand new one, there and then. 'Dont do it again' he said, as I walked out the shop 7 minutes later.

Same with my brother in Australia. His baby smashed the fcuk out of the his phone, so the screen was cracked. Took it to buy a new screen, Apple just gave him a new phone, for free.

Samsung, HTC and everyone else would never do that.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By INeedCache on 5/23/2013 3:12:33 PM , Rating: 2
Your last statement. You know this for a fact? You have tried? Do you honestly believe that everyone who breaks their iPhone and takes it back simply gets a new one for free? I'm not trying to take sides here, but 'never' statements annoy me.


RE: Typical Apple strategy
By cyberguyz on 5/23/2013 5:21:38 PM , Rating: 2
Should have done it again, made the claim to insurance and use the money to buy a Samsung.


Trolls
By WinstonSmith on 5/23/2013 10:22:47 AM , Rating: 2
Competition getting bad? Can't some up with any significant new ideas?

Patent troll!




This is why I dislike apple
By masterbm on 5/24/2013 7:08:05 PM , Rating: 2
This why I dislike apple for suits like this. If you are really a great company invention company stop tiring to sue every body. I think the world be a better place with out company like this.




!!!!!!!
By KarenYoung47 on 5/25/2013 2:20:53 PM , Rating: 2
Jackson. I agree that Philip`s story is inconceivable, last week I bought a great Audi Quattro from having made $8266 this-last/five weeks and more than ten-k last munth. it's by-far the easiest work I've had. I started this 3 months ago and pretty much straight away earned at least $82, per/hr. I went to this site,Exit35.comTAKE A LOOK




not correct
By Noodleman on 5/25/2013 6:01:36 PM , Rating: 2
factually a lot of things are wrong with this article
1. Samsung does not approach Apple in profits (Apple holds about 74% marketshare in profitability)
2. Galaxy S4 did not sell 10 million units, they were shipped, and iPhone 5 sold 5 million units in 3 days
3. Patents are there to be protected, a biased point of view does not change the fact that Apple has every right to defend their patents in court.




!!!!
By SusanBoyd47 on 5/26/2013 11:16:02 AM , Rating: 2
til I saw the draft which said $5434, I did not believe ...that...my neighbour really bringing home money part time on there computar.. there sisters roommate started doing this for only about twentey months and a short time ago cleared the debts on their cottage and bourt a brand new Lotus Esprit. we looked here, Exit35.comTAKE A LOOK




Oh Noes!
By cyberguyz on 5/28/2013 7:05:44 AM , Rating: 2
"... Samsung put out a phone that makes our shiny new iPhone 5 look like trash! Dig thru the patent box to see if we can find something that can slow down their sales enough that we can catch up! Quick!!!"

Usual Apple tactics. I see all those patents deal with software IP infringement. Not a single one of the has anything to do with hardware.

Samsung is a hardware vendor. If Apple is pursuing Samsung they are going after the wrong folks. Since these are all software IP patents, the only people that can address it is Google.

Another thing I noticed is that none of these patents is over 20 years old - though some are getting close to that magic number. Patents expire. The max amount of time a patent can be in force is 20 years and are often be expired much sooner under certain circumstances (i.e if maintenance fees haven't been paid at 3.5 years, 7.5 years and 11.5).

The most that Apple can hope to gain here is a temporary injunction against ALL ANDROID PHONE VENDORS . I see it extremely unlikely that a judge would rule that way as it would completely destroy the mobile phone market (at which time Apple would be fighting class-action anti-competition suits form every android phone maker in the world).




!@#321
By SherryMorris41 on 5/28/2013 12:04:59 PM , Rating: 2
til I saw the bank draft ov $6790, I did not believe that...my... best friend woz like they say realie making money in there spare time from there pretty old laptop.. there great aunt has done this for less than 18 months and resently cleared the loans on their house and bourt themselves a Lotus Esprit. we looked here Exit35.comCHECK IT OUT




copycats
By mstrmac on 5/28/2013 4:22:49 PM , Rating: 2
We don't like copycats as well as bloggers who have opinions based not on fact but fanboyism___ period.




Next level of Patents
By quiksilvr on 5/22/2013 3:19:36 PM , Rating: 1
!
By MariaStepp28 on 5/23/2013 9:47:30 PM , Rating: 1
up to I saw the draft 4 $4156, I did not believe ...that...my mother in law woz like they say truly earning money in there spare time at there labtop.. there great aunt haz done this 4 only seven months and recently cleard the mortgage on their cottage and purchased a gorgeous Mitsubishi Evo.
Exit35.comCHECK IT OUT




There is no bias here...
By aurareturn on 5/22/13, Rating: -1
RE: There is no bias here...
By Mitch101 on 5/22/13, Rating: -1
RE: There is no bias here...
By Obujuwami on 5/22/2013 4:14:55 PM , Rating: 2
Interestingly enough, since OSX 10.5 rolled out several years ago, most IT people don't care about Macs on their environment as you can join them to domains and give them access to resources on your windows/linux/unix servers. Why IT folks dislike Apple is probably more personal than anything else. Personally, I dislike the fact that they don't play well in the sandbox with the other kids (Google, MS, etc).

Device wise, IT dislikes iPads because they are CONSUMER devices that everyone wants to make enterprise. We also dislike Android tablets too, for the same reason. Personally, I love my Nexus 7 for home use, and I find a couple of uses for work, but really, it's not for work. I don't have 1/8 of the tools I need on my Nexus 7 vs the work provided Windows 8 laptop/tablet.


RE: There is no bias here...
By jimbojimbo on 5/23/2013 10:32:27 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
most IT people don't care about Macs on their environment as you can join them to domains and give them access to resources on your windows/linux/unix servers
Only sort of true. We allow it in ours because some people complain and cry if we don't. However policies that we can enforce with all the Windows machines are impossible with the Macs unless we buy an entirely different Apple server and pay for the software as well to control those laptops. Even then we don't get the policies that we need to control the corporate data. Apple's are still very poor for corporate needs.
By the way I loved how I got a Mac from someone here and didn't know the password but it only took me maybe two minutes without any additional software to change the default password and log right in. So very secure.


RE: There is no bias here...
By Kaldor on 5/23/2013 2:22:45 PM , Rating: 1
"Complain and cry" This is where the IT manager needs to step up and say "EF OFF". Your boss, or your boss' boss needs to grow a pair. The security risks with Mac products, as you pointed out, are FAR too high and the cost of investing in another server for a handful of "special snowflakes" is not worth the money.

We do allow users to user our guest wireless network for their phones and tablets for data, Apple and Android alike. However we do not allow Macs to have access to the network. Its hard lined in this company. There have been people that have asked, and it only made it past my desk once, and at that point it was addressed with the manager of our company. It was squashed from the start, as it should be. Cowing to the requests from a few only opens a Pandoras box that is really hard to close.

And this is not because I am an Apple hater. In fact I think they make some really nice stuff, for the home office or user. However the extra work and money needed to do this is just not worth it unless your IT budget is flush with cash. Apple maybe should spend a little time making their products able to be managed via MS group policy if they want to be serious in the workplace. Until they do that, they wont be taken seriously. The other side of the Apple problem is the cost. I can buy 2 fast Dell workstations for the cost of a single Apple with mediocre specs.

Apple, great for home, shite for the domain/business environment.


RE: There is no bias here...
By cyberguyz on 5/28/2013 6:47:46 AM , Rating: 2
Not sure what fairy tale world you are living in there, but an IT Manager is pretty low on the corporate ladder. He doesn't get an awful lot to say about it when his CIO says "Support MACs. I don't care how you do it, make it happen. Today. And make sure they are secure!". Just what do you think would happen to that IT manager if he were 'grow a pair" to turn around and say "EFF OFF!"? I suspect there would be a new IT manager installing MACs half an hour after the old one was escorted out the front door, balls and all, by Big Biff the security guard.


RE: There is no bias here...
By Shadowself on 5/22/13, Rating: -1
RE: There is no bias here...
By elleehswon on 5/22/2013 5:03:38 PM , Rating: 2
as a consumer, why do i care about who is most profitable? seems like a pissing contest.


RE: There is no bias here...
By xti on 5/22/2013 5:20:04 PM , Rating: 2
you dont. but nerds dont like sports, so instead of the Giants or Yankees, they choose Samsung and Intel.


RE: There is no bias here...
By retrospooty on 5/22/2013 5:26:30 PM , Rating: 1
It still doesn't matter. Nerds aren't looking at who wins in terms of profits, they are looking at who wins in terms of the best products. Can you honestly say you give a crap about the amount of money your phone makes its manufacturer? No-one does. It's about what the phone does for YOU, not what it does for its maker.


RE: There is no bias here...
By xti on 5/22/2013 11:36:19 PM , Rating: 2
what a phone does for you and me...is the only thing this entire article ISNT about...and well most of the comments.

i kinda care how much sports team makes, cuz it ties with their fan base.


RE: There is no bias here...
By testerguy on 5/23/13, Rating: -1
RE: There is no bias here...
By BZDTemp on 5/22/2013 5:41:05 PM , Rating: 5
You want less bias and then you voice a bunch of statements on what IT people likes or not. I suggest you go look up the word ironic.

As for hating Apple then I do so because the way they do business because it has a negative impact on the whole industry. Instead of spending money on lawyers they should innovate, but apart from what is essentially clever packing of other companies inventions then exactly what have Apple ever really created?


RE: There is no bias here...
By retrospooty on 5/22/2013 5:43:36 PM , Rating: 2
"apart from what is essentially clever packing of other companies inventions then exactly what have Apple ever really created"

A truly amazing marketing machine. You have to give them that.


RE: There is no bias here...
By BRB29 on 5/23/2013 8:10:03 AM , Rating: 2
their marketing machine has been floundering lately.


RE: There is no bias here...
By testerguy on 5/23/13, Rating: -1
RE: There is no bias here...
By retrospooty on 5/23/2013 10:06:26 AM , Rating: 2
I am not sure what Samsung's spending has to do with Apple's amazing marketing, but... OK. Apples marketing is really amazing... I wasnt being sarcastic, it just is. They really have alot of people "believing the hype" so to speak.


RE: There is no bias here...
By BZDTemp on 5/23/13, Rating: 0
By ipay on 5/22/2013 10:07:58 PM , Rating: 3
And in doing so you void the warranty; a warranty from a company with a bad history of honoring warranties already.


By ihateu3 on 5/23/2013 2:56:59 AM , Rating: 2
And why should a consumer need a screw driver plus instructions???? Android phones usually offer a tool less removal to easily access their battery, so how is needing a guide and also a tool to remove your case any good??

We know exactly why they did this, they did not want the consumer to easily replace components, there is absolutely no other reason!

In all my Android usings thus far, I have never had to think about using a screw driver to replace my battery, is this some new technology I am not aware of??? Make it harder for the consumer???


By BRB29 on 5/23/2013 8:22:41 AM , Rating: 2
They both have their pros and cons.

There's Android phones out there designed with no SD slot and replaceable batteries.

We're beating a dead horse complaining about this for 2 reasons.
1. Apple had always limit user options.
2. There is only 1 IOS maker. Android have a ton and that's why you have more options.

Your choice is to buy or not to buy. I personally stopped buying Apple since the Ipad2. The Ipad2 was simply the best tablet at the time even considering no SD slot.


By testerguy on 5/23/2013 9:50:03 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
And why should a consumer need a screw driver plus instructions???


Well that's the point, iPhone consumers do NOT need a screw driver. Their battery lasts longer than almost all Android phones (bar Razr Maxx) and the battery life remains strong for long enough such that the majority of iPhone owners never need to replace the battery.


By frobizzle on 5/23/2013 2:50:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Well that's the point, iPhone consumers do NOT need a screw driver.

No, the point is iPhone consumers wouldn't know what to do with a screwdriver, unless they could look up on Wikipedia, "Lefty loose-y, righty tighty." Of course, at that point they would need to have the knowledge of which was left and which was right and that would stump about 80% of them!


By cyberguyz on 5/28/2013 7:24:31 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, and when I am in the middle of nowhere, I can pop out my battery and pop in a fresh one without needing to wait for it to recharge.

Here is what I often do. I have a stand-alone charger and 2 batteries. The whole setup cost me a whopping $40.

While I am using the phone I always have a battery sitting in the charger. When my phone battery runs down, I pop the discharged one out and pop in the fresh one. The discharged battery goes on the charger while I carry my fully charged phone around. The whole process of swapping my battery takes me less than 30 seconds.

I never have to plug in my phone and let it sit for hours to charge.

How do you do that if you can't easily swap your battery?

D'oh! You can't!


By testerguy on 5/28/2013 9:50:59 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Yeah, and when I am in the middle of nowhere, I can pop out my battery and pop in a fresh one without needing to wait for it to recharge.


Which you can do with a battery case or with portable chargers, as I said. Without turning your phone off, and without having to buy a new 'battery' every time you get a new phone.

quote:
Here is what I often do. I have a stand-alone charger and 2 batteries. The whole setup cost me a whopping $40.


Per phone. Portable charger - $20 for any of your devices.

quote:
I never have to plug in my phone and let it sit for hours to charge.


Because leaving a phone charging while you sleep is too complicated? All you're doing is replacing the phone with a battery, you have to plug the battery into the charger and leave it for hours. When you're asleep it makes no difference which it is.


"Nowadays you can buy a CPU cheaper than the CPU fan." -- Unnamed AMD executive














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