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Apple sold 31.2 million iPhones for the quarter

Some have doubted whether Apple can continue the momentum it had when Steve Jobs was CEO, but it looks like the tech giant is chugging along with better-than-expected earnings and strong iPhone sales.

For the quarter ended June 30, Apple beat Wall Street expectations with $35.3 billion in sales and earnings of $6.9 billion ($7.47 per share). Wall Street forecasted $35 billion in sales with earnings of $7.32 per share. 

Apple also proved Wall Street wrong when it came to iPhone sales. The company sold 31.2 million of the iOS-powered smartphones for the third quarter, beating Wall Street expectations of 26 million. 

However, Apple fell short of expectations when it came to sales of other devices. While Wall Street predicted sales of 17 million iPads, 4 million Macs and 6.8 million iPods for the quarter, Apple only sold 14.6 million iPads, 3.8 million Macs and 4.5 million iPods.


Still, the increased iPhone sales is a good sign for Apple, considering many believe that the iPhone is becoming outdated thanks to the various options provided by Android-powered Samsung smartphones like the Galaxy S4. Reports indicate that Apple is even trying to test different screen sizes (4.7-inch and 5.7-inch iPhones, and a 13-inch iPad) and options for its future generations of iPhones -- a move that mirrors actions taken by the likes of Samsung. 

“We are especially proud of our record June quarter iPhone sales of over 31 million and the strong growth in revenue from iTunes, Software and Services,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “We are really excited about the upcoming releases of iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks, and we are laser-focused and working hard on some amazing new products that we will introduce in the fall and across 2014.”

Looking forward, Apple expects revenue between $34 and $37 billion with a margin between 36 and 37 percent. 

Apple shares jumped 3.57 percent to $433.94 in after-hours trading. 

Apple has been changing its ways in a few areas regarding its gadgets -- aside from considering screen sizes other than the standard 3.5 and 4-inch versions -- such as the possibility of a more affordable iPhone. Reports say it could have a $99 price tag and could come in a variety of colors. 

Source: Apple



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Coming in low and slow
By Dorkyman on 7/24/2013 12:43:57 PM , Rating: 3
Apple is slowing down. An article in the WSJ today interpreted the fiscal results differently. Even in the iPhone arena, Samsung is kicking Apple's a$$. Mac sales are down, and Apple appears stuck at around 5% of worldwide PC share.




RE: Coming in low and slow
By Dorkyman on 7/24/2013 12:45:38 PM , Rating: 2
Board won't let me post link, but Google "Demand Woes Bite Apple."


RE: Coming in low and slow
By ilt24 on 7/24/2013 1:26:43 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Board won't let me post link, but Google "Demand Woes Bite Apple."


One could also google:

"Apple Juggernaut Powers On, Despite Doubters"
or
"Strong iPhone sales buoy Apple's third quarter, shares climb"

Sure the growth Apple saw in 2010/11 is slowing, but they are still doing quite well as they continue to be able to grab a very high amount of the profits from the markets they participate in.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By MScrip on 7/24/2013 1:04:03 PM , Rating: 3
Samsung is the #1 manufacturer of smartphones... Apple is #2

So what do you think about #3 and below? Aren't those companies in more trouble than Apple?


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Flunk on 7/24/2013 1:42:42 PM , Rating: 3
It was bound to happen, Samsung makes a range of products and Apple is content to only offer higher-end solutions. Apple's strategy of only selling high-margin products still seems to be benefiting their profits. You can't stay #1 producer of anything by only building high-end products. I'm sure Apple knows this and is happy enough raking in outrageous amounts of cash instead of battling Samsung for the mid and low end markets.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By jimbojimbo on 7/24/2013 2:51:08 PM , Rating: 2
This isn't true at all. They still sell the iPhone 4S for $99 and the 4 for free with a two year contract. Those are their low end phones and don't give any argument about how they aren't low end because they were their premiere phones at some point. They ARE now low end phones that the carriers are giving away for that 2 year commitment.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 3:17:07 PM , Rating: 2
A 2 year old phone for $450 (Yes, that is what it costs for the iPhone 4 (4s is $550) is NOT a low end phone. It is a 2 year old high end phone being sold as a mid range phone. Not the same thing at all, and BTW, not cheap. If the Moto X is $299 then the iPhone 4 should be $199, not $450.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Mint on 7/24/2013 7:31:28 PM , Rating: 2
Apple still milks more out of carriers for that 2 year commitment than anyone else. Sprint, for example, had to commit to buying $20B of iPhones to get it on their network, and they're not going to make money on the deal until 2016.

They're probably getting $500 for a 4S. That's not low end in any way.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By BRB29 on 7/25/2013 8:43:46 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
It was bound to happen, Samsung makes a range of products and Apple is content to only offer higher-end solutions. Apple's strategy of only selling high-margin products still seems to be benefiting their profits. You can't stay #1 producer of anything by only building high-end products. I'm sure Apple knows this and is happy enough raking in outrageous amounts of cash instead of battling Samsung for the mid and low end markets.


I think Apple is doing better than everyone else at these profit margins. It has been known that margins are razor thin at the mid and low end markets. Samsung only started to make high profits when they began selling high end phones in mass quantities. Sure, everyone can make high revenue by dumping mass amounts of low and mid range phones. The only thing that's important at the end of the day is the bottom line and that's profits.

Tim Cook is trying to sell "affordable" products now. I think he's doing this because he does not match up to Steve Jobs on the "innovation" side. It's obvious Cook is looking for the brute force methods of mass quantities and lowering the overall margin. He's probably doing this because of pressure from stock holders. Selling affordable electronics is riskier unless you own the production line and can produce them much cheaper than everyone else. Whatever apple makes, everyone else can make the same thing with Android or WP8 and undercut it by $100-150.

What will Tim Cook do after millions of these cheap iphones are stuck and store shelves and their premium brand image is tarnished by oversupply of their products on the market?

Most companies try to go up in the product ladder because it of higher margins making it safer. You cannot only capture the high end market if you have a good brand image. Apple had that and still do. Tim Cook is going down the ladder instead.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/25/2013 9:09:36 AM , Rating: 2
"Tim Cook is trying to sell "affordable" products now. I think he's doing this because he does not match up to Steve Jobs on the "innovation" side."

NAh, that isnt what the lower cost iPhone is about. It's about supply chain and consistent models for devs. In previous year, the 1 year old model drops $100 and the 2 year old model is dropped $200 but all 3 were sold. This time around we will see something different so that all iPhones will have the same screen res and lightening connector. Instead of Selling the iPhone 5s at the top, 5 at $100 less and 4S at $200 less we will see the iPhone 5s at the top, 5 at $100 less and new platsic lower cost one at $200 less. This way there are no more 4x3 screens or lightening connectors selling is mass quantities.

It's a smart move by Apple no matter how you slice it.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Tony Swash on 7/24/2013 1:39:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Samsung is kicking Apple's a$$


I think you will find Samsung is kicking the a$$ of every other Android OEM. Apple are doing just fine. I wonder what Google makes of Samsung building it's own ecosystem?

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/07/samsung-to-...

I was impressed that EA just announced that Apple was now it's "biggest retail partner as measured by sales". Times sure do change.

I also thought this piece on the greater seasonality in the tech markets was quite interesting.

http://techpinions.com/tablets-seasonality-and-ado...


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 1:45:34 PM , Rating: 2
Another boring and totally predictable post. You are just on autopilot lately aren't you?


RE: Coming in low and slow
By greenchinesepuck on 7/24/2013 3:15:50 PM , Rating: 3
The part with EA selling the most on iOS is not boring, sounds like a serious warning sign for stupid bald idiot Ballmer and his laughable Windows RT flop


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 3:34:37 PM , Rating: 2
"sounds like a serious warning sign for stupid bald idiot Ballmer and his laughable Windows RT flop"

After Windows Vista's failure, and Windows 7 success via listening to what customers want didnt cement in how to do things, then nothing will. Looking At Win8 and XBOne MS is clearly trying to push what they want and what customers want is irrelevant. If that is how MS wants to operate as mobile gets bigger and bigger then EA is irrelevant. MS has way bigger problems.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By greenchinesepuck on 7/24/2013 3:58:50 PM , Rating: 2
With xbone MS simply tried to follow the success of Steam but was caught off guard by a bunch of very noisy internet trolls, that was all to it. Hopefully they will later revert back to online only game distro when those trolls die out by natural causes


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 4:31:33 PM , Rating: 2
Right... Because the ability to share your games with friends or buy/sell used games is a troll trait... So is the ability to play games you bought without internet /rolls eyes.

Beyond that, it didnt have to be en "either or" situation. It's 100% possible to do what they had wanted with online games and allow used games. The fact that you think it has to be either or like MS says shows that you are not thinking clearly.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Cheesew1z69 on 7/24/2013 4:39:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
shows that you are not thinking clearly.
It's Pirks, isn't that much obvious?


RE: Coming in low and slow
By greenchinesepuck on 7/24/2013 6:18:28 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Because the ability to share your games with friends or buy/sell used games is a troll trait
Yep, and Steam has proved long ago that I'm right. Wanna argue with Gabe Newell huh? :P


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 6:24:18 PM , Rating: 1
I fail to see how Steam is relevant. The facts are this...

MS had the "must be online rule" and "no disk sharing" and set it up to be able to log in anywhere and d/l your games. They then backtracked because the world hated the "must be online rule" and "no disk sharing" , and being the spiteful bitches they are, they also took the online access away rather than just coding it to work. Again, there is NO REASON they cant set it up to do the online access dealio, while the "must be online rule" and "no disk sharing" is disabled. They are different issues altogether.

If anyone should be pissed off at MS its people like you that wanted the online access. They took it away for no good reason.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By greenchinesepuck on 7/24/2013 7:03:36 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
MS had the "must be online rule" and "no disk sharing" and set it up to be able to log in anywhere and d/l your games
This is EXACTLY how Steam operates. If not for dumb trolls, MS would proceed and make XBOne look like a Steam clone, which would guarantee its success long term. I'm pretty sure they will revert to online only policy later, but they will be more careful this time, to not to disturb the remnants of those dying brick and mortar store trolls


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 7:49:25 PM , Rating: 2
The obvious flaw in your logic is that Steam is an online service XBO is a console with a slot where you insert disks.

There is absolutely no reason the XBO has to be that way. You can have both the online games and the ability to share disks. Its not rocket science, its a right decision and a ROM update.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By ven1ger on 7/24/2013 8:21:04 PM , Rating: 2
Steam doesn't require always online. I've played my games while not being connected to Steam. Only time I connect to Steam is to update or download games to install, other than that never.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/24/2013 9:06:32 PM , Rating: 2
Console owners still have the mentality where the games are physical objects. That's just how it is, and its why aggressive DRM to limit the trade and resale of physical goods got such huge backlash.

The best option for consoles right now is the one we currently have: Allow people to buy digital and not trade, or to buy physical and trade.

Steam is a different story because it added convenience to already aggressive DRM practices with CD keys and other unfriendly online authentication methods. Physical media also wasn't a factor because you just install the game to a hard drive anyway.

Physical media is the restriction with consoles.

Portable devices like e-readers, smartphones, and tablets are different because not having to swap media is the point. Portability trumps the ability to resell with physical media.

Consoles have neither the DRM nor piracy issues of PCs (at least not to the same degree), and they aren't portable devices so its fine to have swappable media on a shelf nearby.

Apples and oranges all the way around.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Tony Swash on 7/24/2013 4:02:17 PM , Rating: 1
What's interesting about the EA news is that EA is making more money via Apple than via it's own Origin service. I noticed from the Apple financial Q&A follow up that iTunes now has over one billion customer accounts.

Just to throw out a thought: I think Apple may discontinue all existing iPhone models in September.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By greenchinesepuck on 7/24/2013 7:06:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just to throw out a thought
I remember you throwing out a thought that Apple stock would hit $1000. Now you start throwing out thoughts again. Oh boy.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 7:52:32 PM , Rating: 2
LOL... He also said Google was turning its back on Android, just a few months ago. Funny, all I see everywhere this week is new droids, MotoX and the Nexus 7, BTW, the highest DPI tablet available, faster, sharper, better than iPad mini in every way and still $100 less.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Tony Swash on 7/24/2013 7:19:38 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Just to throw out a thought: I think Apple may discontinue all existing iPhone models in September.


Actually I will re-phrase that. Discontinue all phones that use a 30 pin connector.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/24/2013 8:47:07 PM , Rating: 1
If there is one place where a monopoly can be declared, it is in iOS app development. It is so far ahead of every other phone and tablet platform in terms of quality, breadth, and profitability. Google putting iOS app priority over their own Android and EA declaring the App Store as their single most profitable channel are huge data points.

The only thing holding Microsoft back from releasing Office on iOS is trying to keep it on RT to make the platform more desirable. Otherwise you had years of iOS apps from Microsoft that exceeded even their own Windows Phone. How long was OneNote only on iOS?


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/24/2013 6:05:46 PM , Rating: 5
Samsung is outselling Apple thanks to low end devices. Comparable high end smartphones like the GS3/4 and GN2 make under a quarter of Samsung's total sales. Even the old iPhone 4S outsells the GS4. Samsung is certainly killing everyone else in smartphone sales, just look at how much trouble HTC, Motorola, and Nokia are in.

Mac sales are down, and I think that's attributable to the same reason why all other PC sales are down: computers have been "good enough" for the last couple years. I upgraded my Lynnfield i7 desktop PC to a Haswell after nearly four years, and in general use the difference is barely noticeable.

I used to replace my PC every 18-24 months, now I can go four years and not really need to upgrade, and I play PC games on a 1440p display. For "normals" the reason to upgrade is even less. What does Haswell offer aside from 12+ hours of battery life on a laptop? Not enough to force an upgrade for most people, not unless the hardware fails.

Desktop and laptop sales were partly driven by tangible improvements in performance. That doesn't exist in any meaningful way right now.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Gio6518 on 7/24/2013 6:33:13 PM , Rating: 2
Forgot to mention iPad sales also down

quote:
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2284323/a...


quote:
Samsung is kicking Apple's a$$


Samsung is the big dog.. .. hence Apple's fear with all the attempts to get them banned


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Tony Swash on 7/24/2013 7:31:21 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Forgot to mention iPad sales also down


The iPad Mini came out in March 2012. The last iPad refresh was in November 2012. This quarter with an ageing iPad product line, is being compared to a year ago quarter with a recently refreshed iPad line. The interesting comparison will be the next quarter, presumably the holiday quarter, following an iPad product refresh compared to the previous year.

I saw Google is claiming 70 million Android tablets. If that is true I have to ask what do Android tablet owners actually use their tablets for given results like this ?

http://chitika.com/insights/2013/june-tablet-updat...

All metrics show the same huge imbalance of actual usage with iOS crushing all other tablets in platform use. If there is one thing I would have thought all tablet owners would use their tablets for it's surfing the web, but apparently not Android tablet owners.

So what do they do with them?


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 8:16:22 PM , Rating: 2
"So what do they do with them?"

1st off your metric has nothing to do with anything... It doesn't affect sales, and has no bearing on what tablet people choose or its features.

What do people do with them? Well, speaking for myself and the people I have seen using them, we check our email, home and work, play games, browse the web, watch Netflix or whatever media of choice, log in to work computers/servers remotely, GPS, and a whole myriad of other things. If you can figure out how IOS web-traffic is relevant to anyones purchase, please fill us in though.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/24/2013 8:39:05 PM , Rating: 4
Tablets shipped and tablets sold are two different things. Of all these companies, Apple is the only one that releases actual sales numbers. Even Amazon doesn't give sales numbers. The only practical measure right now is web traffic.

The iPad accouting for 85% of tablet internet traffic, the Kindle accounting for about 5%, and everything else accounting for less, paints a different picture than shipment numbers that a so-called "analyst" pulled out of thin air.

Usage metrics are totally relevant when talking about sales given that nobody outside of Apple releases numbers.

That's unless you want to believe that people buy hundreds of millions of Android tablets and just don't use them. I don't think that could be anywhere close to an actual scenario. People simply aren't buying them, which is why developers still aren't supporting them, which is why you see enterprise and specialized fields like medical and aviation going iOS on top of the standard consumer apps, and so on.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/24/2013 10:04:02 PM , Rating: 2
Yawn... Thanks for your weekly pop in repeating the same tired lines. Again, this has zero effect on purchases and useability. Great that IOS users browse alot. How does that effect anyone? Zero, that is how...Can't wait to see how you poop all over the new Nexus 7 even though it blows the doors off the competition, especially the iPad mini. The latest rumors say the iPad mini 2 won't have retina... Bummer. That was the one Apple product I would have bought.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/25/2013 3:39:11 AM , Rating: 2
Once again you lack the ability to connect the dots.

People using iPads isn't spurring more people to buy them, it is the result of more people owning them over competing tablets.

People aren't buying Android tablets in any substantial numbers, that's what these usage numbers mean. Apple sells more iPads in a month than what Amazon and Samsung move combined in a single quarter. End of story.

As for pooping all over the new Nexus 7, it is decent hardware that continues to show lag in the UI and lacks a substantial app market. Oh, and 16:9 at 7", still the worst thing about it. As usual, if all you do is Netflix and Angry Birds then its an excellent deal.

I agree re: the res of the iPad mini, retina will make that device much better. As it stands it is still smoother and has much better apps, but if you want to save some cash then its hard to argue with the Nexus 7.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/25/13, Rating: 0
RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/25/2013 4:36:13 AM , Rating: 2
But on the plus side, Chromecast seems really cool!


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/25/2013 8:41:22 AM , Rating: 2
I still find it hilarious... You and Tony are something You and Tony are something else... You keep championing your platform of choice and have so little to cheer about. It costs more, does less, has less features and less useability.... But dammit, it has the highest web traffic. All hail Apple. When people go to buy a phone, or tablet, they arent looking at which model generates the most web traffic. It's a total non-factor. If you are in ads/billing or development, it may come into play. As for the other 99% of humanity no-one gives a rats ass.

As for lag, again, you need to update your old arguments. A few OEM's bloat it out, Samsung is the absolute worst, but Android itself doesnt have those issues and hasnt for over a year since 4.1. Samsung's software engineers should all be fired for how badly they bloat it out, but its not android. Even my old dual core GS3 with CM10.1 is smooth as silk in all areas, as are my old model Nexus 7. You keep having arguments with the ghost of years last. Hilarious.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/25/2013 8:57:23 PM , Rating: 3
It costs the same and does objectively more thanks to better software and hardware ecosystems.

I have no issues with other ecosystems. I myself own hardware and software platforms from pretty much everywhere. I have no horse in this race, the only thing I have an issue with is when bad arguments and false conclusions are made.

When someone takes invented numbers from analysts and puts them up against hard online metrics and revenue numbers from Google of all companies, that's when I have to jump in.

The thing is that you yourself are bringing up marketshare in this argument. When other numbers conflict with your argument, then you change the argument to ones of usability and utility. You are totally inconsistent and draw from sketchy sources only to back up your personal bias.

You are not equipped, as a human being, to have a discussion with anyone who's mind is not a complete mirror of your own. Its clear that people like you (and Swash) would be much happier in a circlejerky environment that discourages critical thinking.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By TakinYourPoints on 7/25/2013 9:03:59 PM , Rating: 2
The problem is that you frame your arguments from the direction of emotion, not logic. You bring up me "poo pooing" the Nexus 7. My issues isn't where the N7 comes from, it comes from having a 16:9 display running slower hardware and an inferior tablet software library. Its sole advantage is price, which again is a completely legitimate reason to make a purchase.

I get all this, but I deal with objective advantages and disadvantages. You are more like a cheerleader that's wrapped up in a team or a zealot that's wrapped up in a religion. Its a weird mentality that I don't understand.

These are just products. Every ecosystem has pros and cons, and its weird when some people flip out when you dare mention that the "other team" has advantages over the other, or that they are used more or have sold more.

Why does reality make some of you so angry? Why can't you enjoy what you have?

Louis CK said it best, "Everything is amazing and nobody is happy"


RE: Coming in low and slow
By retrospooty on 7/25/2013 10:57:07 PM , Rating: 2
"You are not equipped, as a human being, to have a discussion with anyone who's mind is not a complete mirror of your own"

Its an amazing thing irony.

You could either practice what you preach, or stop having arguments no one else is having.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By Tony Swash on 7/25/2013 9:48:00 AM , Rating: 1
What's required is the use of the right metric for measuring the right thing. The more simple minded approach, a sort of atavistic hankering for the falsely remembered simplicities of the old PC market, is to just use market share of devices shipped as a metric to measure everything.

If one wants to assess the current viability, relative success and failure, or long term prospects of a company then one needs to measure metrics of commercial success and failure the most important of which are revenue trends and, above all, profitability. Then would come an assessment of the long term viability of a business using various metrics such as in what direction are sales and financial indicators moving, how loyal are it's customers base, how much control does it have over it's supply chain and inventory, how vertically integrated is it, how stable and competent are it's top managers, how highly or poorly rated is it's brand.

If one wants to assess the current viability, relative success and failure, or long term prospects of competing platforms then one needs to measure platform success metrics. This would include indicators of platform usage (web usage, enterprise, educational and government adoption rates, etc), indicators of the size and scope of commercial activity on the platform (e-business activity rates, advertising numbers, developer revenues etc), and, in so far as it is not negated by negative performance in the previous two groups of metrics, the trend in platform numbers (installed base, sales trends).

In the case of a company like Apple which wholly owns and promotes a platform all the above metrics are potentially relevant because commercial success is connected to (although not driven by - note the Mac) platform success. In the case of an Android OEM only commercial metrics are truly relevant, after all if platform performance metrics were useful as a metric of Android OEM performance one would end up arguing that Samsung and HTC were both enjoying equal success.

In the mobile device markets neither the commercial success of any participating company nor the relative strengths and weaknesses of competing platforms can be deduced solely, or even mainly, from simple market share numbers. Crude market share numbers will continue to hypnotise some observers obscuring all other, and more important, metrics, and as a result some observers become disorientated when presented with any analysis using different metrics or any analysis that weaves a narrative using several metrics.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By robinthakur on 7/29/2013 7:05:26 AM , Rating: 2
I disagree up to a point. I see quite a lot of Nexus 7 devices on my travels with people typically reading e-books on them, but the fact that devs don't really earn anything from them is a cause for concern, you would think, especially with the bargain basement subsidized cost. This might not be an issue for Google, after all, they make ad-revenue which is money for nothing, but for everyone else in the ecosystem from the OEM's trying to shift the full priced Android tablets to the developers, it is a pretty major concern.

Anecdotally, we have a Nexus 7 at home, which my partner bought to play with when it was released, but he doesn't really use it, it is usually in a drawer and we tend to use the iPad, kindle and our laptops more. I don't think he's ever paid for any software on it and just downloaded the free Google ones and Kindle, which is, I guess, what most people do.


RE: Coming in low and slow
By robinthakur on 7/29/2013 6:57:36 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I saw Google is claiming 70 million Android tablets. If that is true I have to ask what do Android tablet owners actually use their tablets for given results like this ?


Mine sits in my draw at home and I use my iPads most of the time. The nexus was a nice device in and of itself, but it lacked the apps I use on a daily basis, especially for work so I don't use it anymore. Google apps on it were good though, but they also exist on iOS and generally they seem to work better (with a couple of exceptions)


“We do believe we have a moral responsibility to keep porn off the iPhone.” -- Steve Jobs

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