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Apple's Phil Schiller is trying to reach out to customers and developers and personally fast-track rejected App Store apps to approval. Despite this, the base problem of the rejections occurring in the first place remains.  (Source: Digital Daily)
After rejections, one Apple executive is trying hard to win customers -- and developers -- back

Apple's app store practices have bordered on schizophrenia, with it frequently accepting applications only to later reject them and rejecting others only to later accept them.  Worse yet, frequently rejections seem to follow no consistent pattern, with some apps being rejected for containing some sort of forbidden content, while others with that same content get accepted.

These inconsistencies have led to customers growing dissatisfied with the iPhone -- or in some cases even leaving it.  They have also led to a growing discontent among developers, some of whom have also jumped ship.  And it has even brought down a government investigation concerning Apple's role in rejecting the Google Voice app.

However, there is one man who hopes to fix the system.  Apple’s Senior Vice President of Worldwide Product Marketing Phil Schiller is trying to right the iPhone App Store and is personally taking a hand in trying to win back customers, developers, and placate government investigators.

Mr. Schiller (with occasional help from Phil Shoemaker, Apple’s Director of Application Technology) has been surveying the blogosphere and personally picking up on blogs about unjustly rejected iPhone apps.  He's then contacting app developers and personally trying to work with them to get the apps approved.

Jonathan Bayme, the CEO of Theory11, was frustrated when his Rising Card application was rejected for being "confusing" to customers (despite the fact that the whole idea of a magic trick is to confuse).  However, a blog posting and dialogue with Mr. Schiller later the app was on its way to being accepted and he had changed his tune.

He describes:
Schiller was unbelievably responsive throughout the whole ordeal. Our first communication from him was late at night on the 11th - with another email sent to us an hour later. He was extremely nice and although not promising anything, he said he would have their team look into the situation ASAP.

To be frank, Chris and I [the creators] were both amazed that this had reached the heights it had at all - given the fact that it is just a fun magic trick. We had spent months creating, polishing, and finishing this thing - and up until then we thought all hope was lost. It’s been quite the rollercoaster.

This morning, we received another email from Schiller advising us that Phil Shoemaker (Director of Application Technology) would be in touch with us soon to discuss our app, and as promised I received a phone call about three hours later from Phil. Shoemaker said that his team was looking into the issue as we spoke, and he was hopeful to see resolution of this by the end of the day.

True to his word - it was in fact approved late this afternoon. In sincerity the whole process was quite the ordeal, but I must say that I respect the hell out of the fact that we received the personal attention that we did. They were responsive, attentive, and truly listened to what we were saying. While one could argue that it took us over a month to get to that point, I would judge this situation based on the lengths they went to to fix the problem - they were incredible.
Mr. Bayme's story is not an isolated one -- many developers are coming to view Mr. Schiller and Mr. Shoemaker as "app saviors".  The good news for Apple here is that it appears to be trying to change its ways, and to some extent its working.

However, a critical problem still remains.  While Mr. Schiller and Mr. Shoemaker appear to be performing above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to damage control, the illogical rejections continue.  Thus while Apple's executive leadership seems to be changing its tune, the Apple employees responsible with screening appear to be singing the same old notes.  And until that changes, there will still be headaches in store for developers, customers, and the Apple executives alike.


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The fastest way to solve the problem...
By MrBlastman on 8/17/2009 1:40:16 PM , Rating: 5
Is to stop buying I-Phones. That will get their attention _really_ fast.

They'll either decide to stop their asinine business practices (doubtful) or they'll go out of business. Either way, it is a win, as the consumers will have spoken and surely have been heard by that point.




RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By Hieyeck on 8/17/2009 1:41:44 PM , Rating: 5
About as likely as asking stupid to stop being stupid.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By BrandtTheMan on 8/17/2009 1:54:04 PM , Rating: 5
or about as likely as customers using common sense


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By Mitch101 on 8/17/2009 2:19:35 PM , Rating: 5
That term has been changed to Un-Common Sense . Since its not actually common.


By tviceman on 8/17/2009 2:34:48 PM , Rating: 1
True that.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By quiksilvr on 8/17/2009 3:30:33 PM , Rating: 5
But therein lies the problem. Nearly all forms of business is based on consumers' stupidity.

You don't want educated people entering a jewelry store asking about color, clarity and cut quality and ensuring that the price is not ridiculously marked up.

You don't want an educated person standing next to the mechanic while he runs a diagnostic check, bringing out a transmission color chart to make sure that the mechanic isn't messing with the fluid.


By slashbinslashbash on 8/17/2009 6:36:21 PM , Rating: 5
Because jewelry stores don't have little brochures in them telling customer all about cut, color, and clarity....

Diamonds are a big scam. ALL diamonds sold as individual diamonds (say, 1/8 carat or higher) are ridiculously marked up. Sapphires are rarer in nature but priced much less than comparable diamonds. That's because there is not a worldwide monopoly on the cutting, distribution and marketing of sapphires like there is for diamonds. Jewelers love it when they talk about cut, color, and clarity and they can bring you over to the much more expensive diamonds. Just try to sell a diamond to a jewelry store and you'll see how much it's really worth.

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/198202/diamond


By quiksilvr on 8/17/2009 11:25:34 PM , Rating: 2
You hit the nail dead on. I wonder if people actually know that if they buy diamonds during the summer, they are usually only twice the markup and in the fall and winter its roughly 4 or more. Gotta love consumer economics.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By invidious on 8/17/09, Rating: 0
RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By MrBlastman on 8/17/2009 3:53:58 PM , Rating: 2
Sure it is a win. It will show other companies that if they try draconian practices on the consumer, they will lose.

Treat your customers well if you want them to spend money with you. That is how it would be a good thing.

Apple has more evil in them than (Microsoft is perceived to) and Google combined. Steve Jobs, purely on his Evil power level alone, would even crush Larry "The Eyebrowless" Ellison with ease.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By Chaser on 8/17/2009 4:02:39 PM , Rating: 2
About as effective as you standing at the base of a cliff with an open umbrella pointing at a 100 foot diameter snow ball rolling towards you at 35 miles an hour. Or the useless posts in here that Apple or anyone else could give a rats ass about.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By MrBlastman on 8/17/2009 4:12:57 PM , Rating: 5
Companies need money to stay in business. Unless you are a car company or a bank, if you cut off that money supply, you'll go under.

How is that ineffective? The only variable in the equation is the average apple drone. Perhaps if Microsoft ran an ad with the PC guy shooting the Mac guy it would get people talking. :)

PC Guy: Hello, I'm a PC.
Mac Guy: Hello, I'm a Mac.

Mac Guy: Hey PC, why do you look so smug today?
PC Guy: Oh, no reason. *grins* I've been playing around with my latest app in my toolkit - and boy is it great.

Mac Guy: Oh? What is it? I doubt it is anything we don't have in our App Store.

PC Guy: *sly look on face* You really want to see?
Mac Guy: Sure, lemme have it.

PC Guy: *pulls out a gun-shaped object and it proceeds to shoot the Mac guy who explodes in a red mist*

PC Guy: They call this the "Rotten Apple detector... I guess it works pretty good, eh Mac?

PC Guy: Mac?

PC Guy: *looks at a bloodstained mess* *blinks*


By daniyarm on 8/21/2009 1:28:33 PM , Rating: 2
This would top the list of best commercials for the year!


By jRaskell on 8/19/2009 1:56:39 PM , Rating: 2
I'm perfectly fine with Apple being destroyed. May not be perceived as a win for Apple fans, but it'd frankly be a win for the rest of the market. Closed standards benefit NOBODY but the manufacturer controlling those standards, and that's what Apple is all about.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By gstrickler on 8/17/2009 4:54:53 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
... or they'll go out of business.
Several flaws with that:

1. Most people don't buy the iPhone so that they can buy some not yet developed app from the App Store. They buy the iPhone because it's an easy to use cell phone with email and a real web browser. Specific apps that are ALREADY available from the App Store may be a contributing factor for some buyers.

2. Rumor's of Apple's demise have been greatly exaggerated for years. If you read the pundits or blogs, Apple has been "doomed" or "about to go out of business" for at least 15 years. Ignore the fact that they've never been close to shutting down, have at least $10B in liquid assets, a growing market share, several of the hottest products in their respective markets, and margins that other manufacturers can only dream about.

Sure, get everyone to stop buying iPhones, and iPods, and stuff from the iTunes Music Store, and Apps from the App Store, and Macs, and iPod/iPhone accessories, and anything else Apple makes or makes money from licensing and Apple would eventually go out of business. While you're at it, get everyone to stop buying Microsoft Windows and MS Office, after all MS is no model corporate citizen. Good luck with that plan.

Develop a better product, price it competitively, and market it effectively, and take the market away from Apple. Go on, get started now. When you've got a great idea and a business plan, I'm sure you'll be able to find investors. Be sure to allow all your competitors to use your software, because Apple is "wrong" for not allowing their competitors to use Apple's software to support the competitor's hardware, and you don't want to be like Apple.

Apple isn't the only company with a vested interest in seeing the iPhone/iPod succeed. There are hundreds of companies making money off accessories, applications, and content for those devices, and those companies want buyers for those products.


By teng029 on 8/17/2009 6:16:42 PM , Rating: 2
every now and then someone actually posts something on DT that makes sense.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By MrBlastman on 8/18/2009 10:45:37 AM , Rating: 3
Here's an idea--why don't you keep being an Apple fanboi quietly in a corner and we'll all just pretend you aren't there?

You are in denial if you do not realize how draconian Apple has been over the years. Also, you are quite high on your Apple pie if you think Apple was smart in not allowing others to market and sell cloned hardware and their operating systems. That was the number one reason Apple lost to IBM/Microsoft back in the day.

Apple had a "killer app" in the Apple II - it was nearly a household name back in the day. They then spent money on and developed both the Mac and IIGS. Not only did they spend money on the IIGS, they wasted it and did not properly market an amazing product. They screwed the pooch royally on it.

On the Macintosh--they had a product that a lot of people could use and it was a step above MS-DOS at the time because it was GUI, it was far more accessible. It _did_ have a black and white screen, which was a turnoff to some people and it also was very expensive. Companies wanted to clone the Mac and make it cheaper. Apple could have complied. If the PC had never been cloned and only IBM sold the hardware with MS-DOS, things might have turned out differently.

However, history shows that it was cloned, the price dropped dramatically and people bought PC's. Apple really screwed up and they lost the PC war. That was asinine reasoning on Apple's part. They wanted to keep it all to themselves. That hurt them.

They didn't die and they lived to fight again with Steve's return and he did a number of amazing marketing feats to pick the company back up and here we are today. Right back to where they were in the 1980's. The brand name is hot, people love the product, they have perceived innovative ideas (us geeks know otherwise) and what are they doing?

They are pissing on their customers again!

Lets see:
Draconian I-Phone App store

i-tunes kicking other phones off of it

Operating system only working on Apple Hardware

Rediculous prices

Crappy reliability and workmanship (My wife has gone through 3 macbook batteries on a macbook only 3 years old, my Dell is still on its original and it is 4 years old)

Exploding i-Pods that people are being forced to sign NDA's in order to receive Warranty Treatment?!?! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!!!

I'm going to stop there for the sake of dramatics. I could list many more.

Didn't history teach them anything?

Actually, it did. It taught them to spend millions on marketing tripe in order to brainwash i-fans like yourself in order to bring them into the cult and put up with all the poor treatment they are receiving. It is working, sadly.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By gstrickler on 8/18/2009 2:57:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Here's an idea--why don't you keep being an Apple fanboi quietly in a corner and we'll all just pretend you aren't there?
And just where in my post does it indicate I'm an Apple fanboi?
quote:
Crappy reliability and workmanship (My wife has gone through 3 macbook batteries on a macbook only 3 years old, my Dell is still on its original and it is 4 years old)
Neither Apple nor Dell make batteries, other companies make them for Apple and Dell. Defects happen.
quote:
The brand name is hot, people love the product ....
They must be doing something right.
quote:
...they have perceived innovative ideas...
They do innovate, just review your computer history. That you don't like their attitude/policies doesn't change that fact.

I'll tell you the same thing I told the original poster. Come up with a better product, market it effectively, and take the market away from them. We call that free market capitalism.
quote:
us geeks know otherwise
From dictionary.com
Geek –noun
1. a peculiar or otherwise dislikable person, esp. one who is perceived to be overly intellectual.
2. a computer expert or enthusiast (a term of pride as self-reference, but often considered offensive when used by outsiders.)
3. a carnival performer who performs sensationally morbid or disgusting acts, as biting off the head of a live chicken.

Which definition applies to you?


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By MrBlastman on 8/18/2009 3:13:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote>Neither Apple nor Dell make batteries, other companies make them for Apple and Dell. Defects happen.

You can try and dodge accountability all you want, but the fact is the battery is in an Apple product and when it malfunctions repeatedly (and is replaced by Apple themselves), I along with the average consumer do not care if it is manufactured by someone else. As far as we are concerned, it is in an Apple product.

The bulk of all electronics parts are manufactured by other companies and only assembled by the final brand, such as Apple, IBM, HP, Dell etc. It is still though, the brands fault if they choose to use shoddy parts. It absolutely falls into Apples hands for blame.

quote:
I'll tell you the same thing I told the original poster. Come up with a better product, market it effectively, and take the market away from them. We call that free market capitalism.


The right to buy or not buy a product and speaking with your wallet is also free market capitalism. I'm the original poster--look up. What part of choosing not to buy something to punish a company is not free market?

It is just as effective and in ways, moreso if many consumers go the same route. How are you going to operate without any money?

quote:
Which definition applies to you?


If you asked my wife, she'd probably say all three. :)


By gstrickler on 8/18/2009 3:45:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
If you asked my wife, she'd probably say all three. :)
Good answer :)
quote:
The right to buy or not buy a product and speaking with your wallet is also free market capitalism. I'm the original poster--look up. What part of choosing not to buy something to punish a company is not free market?

It is just as effective and in ways, moreso if many consumers go the same route. How are you going to operate without any money?
It is free market capitalism, but most boycotts are notoriously ineffective.

From http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/encyclopedia/A...
Most boycotts deliver less than they set out to achieve, though, and as a mechanism for change they have a very spotted record. Financially, boycotts have had negligible impact on their targets, according to a 1997 study published in the Journal of Business Research. Some of the least successful boycotts, now all but abandoned in the United States, have been consumer protests against price increases. Other ill-fated boycotts have been directed at only one link in a complex chain of factors, making the object of the boycott seem unclear or unrealistic. Still others never appeal to widely held values in order to attract mass support.

As I said in my original post, good luck with that. Offer a comparable or better product under better terms (price and/or support and/or reliability, etc) and you're much more likely to have an impact. While I whole heartedly agree with "voting with your wallet", if you want to change policies/practices, you usually need to go beyond that.


RE: The fastest way to solve the problem...
By OSUHarms on 8/18/2009 8:36:20 AM , Rating: 2
I tell you what I hate...that picture of the bullet going through the apple. Since when does an entry hole of a bullet explode outward instead of inward...


By 0ldman on 8/18/2009 10:14:07 AM , Rating: 2
That's a photo from a high speed camera. Plenty of those on the net. Pretty cool stuff.


By Smilin on 8/21/2009 3:10:24 PM , Rating: 2
That's how it happens. It might be easier to wrap your head around if you think about what's going on in the moment just before the bullet exits the apple.

The entry hole blowing outward is essentially "throw" from a crater that is formed by the impact.


The Apple Brand.
By dark matter on 8/17/2009 1:47:37 PM , Rating: 2
Despite what the fanboys say, there is little really to distinguish between Windows, OSX and Linux. They all use the WIMP system. Everything else is purely cosmetic. The purpose of an OS is to manage and create user files. The ideal OS would be completely transparent to the user. None of them manage this, and they are all pretty much the same.

The thing what sets Apple apart is the styling of their machines and the prestige of their brand. Hence the reason you see Apple laptops in movies. They look good. No-one can take that away from Apple.

However, Apple do have to be careful of their brand image. And recent incidents can seriously damage the Apple brand if Apple isn't careful. If they damage their brand then all they are offering is just another PC / phone / Mp3 player. If you don't think it is possible, go and check out how much hate their is for Sony. Remember, Sony was synonymous with the Walkman (the older brother of the iPod).

Seems like they are moving in the right direction. This chap has his work cut out for him. Or they may end up just like Sony or Levi's.




RE: The Apple Brand.
By AEvangel on 8/17/2009 2:03:38 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The thing what sets Apple apart is the styling of their machines and the prestige of their brand. Hence the reason you see Apple laptops in movies. They look good. No-one can take that away from Apple.


It really had nothing to do with appearance, but more to do with Apple marketing specifically marketing their products to the studios. Also it doesn't hurt when Steve is in bed with Disney as well.

Apple Gets a Big Slice Of Product-Placement Pie
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/artic...


RE: The Apple Brand.
By dark matter on 8/17/2009 2:06:59 PM , Rating: 2
It must have something to do with appearance. They can have the best marketers in the world but if the director decides the laptop likes like a pile of turd and there is no way in hell it is being used then his word is final.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By rudy on 8/17/2009 2:21:49 PM , Rating: 2
It is both remember just before this line of mac books when they started with the imacs and macbooks which had fruity colors and generally looked like kids toys? Not a person would be caught dead with them. Even though apple was trying back then. And it is most likely that th number one complaint they recieved was they are to laughable. So they fixed the problem went with conservative colors and silver on the pro line and it allowed them to grow more.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By rudy on 8/17/2009 2:24:32 PM , Rating: 2
I should add to the both part. So once they had a product that was not bad looking then they could actually score spots in movies. They learned a valuable lesson just in time to save the iPod. I think the company that really showed everyone in the tech industry how important this could be was motorola with the razr they had a great looking new product but they needed to get it some attention so they dropped it in the hands of a bunch of stars for free for one of the big awards and the rest is history. The razr would be the most iconic phone of the flip phone era.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By 91TTZ on 8/17/2009 5:17:21 PM , Rating: 2
This is dead wrong. Those fruity iMacs were a huge hit both in sales and in influence. Remember just how many devices began shipping with translucent blue and clear colors? Those fruity iMacs helped save Apple.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By 91TTZ on 8/17/2009 5:21:13 PM , Rating: 2
http://www.forbes.com/2000/04/14/feat.html

Those fruity Macs were a huge success for Apple. Before they were introduced the company was in the pits. During their run, the company's stock surged more than 300%.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By sigmatau on 8/17/2009 2:44:13 PM , Rating: 2
There is no way a movie studio would include a product without some compensation. It could be that they are partnered in some way with Apple. Most likely, like all other companies, Apple simply pays for product placement.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By 91TTZ on 8/17/2009 5:24:00 PM , Rating: 2
Also, the crowd that Apple aims for is the same crowd that's involved in the fashion and movie studios. Liberal, artsy people LOVE Apple and it probably doesn't take much prodding to get them to advocate for Apple.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By StevoLincolnite on 8/17/2009 3:43:44 PM , Rating: 2
Personally I like the look of the older Thermaltake Xaser 2 cases decked out with Neons and other glowy bits, or even the Alienware styling over a Mac, but that's just me.

Marketing plays a MASSIVE part in sales, why else did the Pentium 4 outsell the Athlon 64? It sure as hell wasn't because the Pentium 4 was cheaper or faster.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By Tony Swash on 8/18/2009 5:51:17 AM , Rating: 2
"Despite what the fanboys say, there is little really to distinguish between Windows, OSX and Linux. They all use the WIMP system."

That's not my experience. I am what I consider to be a power user of both macosX and vista on multiple hardware configurations, I also support a range of users on both platforms, and I find the following:

Productivity: macosx is between 30% and 50% more productive doing anything other than the simplest tasks

UI Design: macosX has a much, much better UI design than Vista. Accessing a variety of standard OS tasks is much easier, more intuitive and the actual visual appearance of the interface is an order of magnitude better in macosX (do employees of Microsoft have obligatory taste bypass operations when they recruited?).

Stability: macosX is still more stable than Vista

Security: I support a variety of non-secuirty conscious users using out of the box standard macosx security settings running on various macs, all using the internet regularly, and none of them have ever had any security issues of any kind. Windows XP out of the box security is farcical and Vista's security systems, while better than XP, is cumbersome and intrusive.

So put all that software advantage on to superior and very attractive hardware and you have a winner - hence Apples stellar sales and financial performance during the recession.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By Alexstarfire on 8/18/2009 6:16:25 AM , Rating: 2
OK, I can agree with you up till your last point. Superior hardware? In what ways is it superior? It uses the same components PCs use, just more expensive.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By Tony Swash on 8/18/2009 12:22:48 PM , Rating: 2
Pick and handle and use a macbook pro and then pick up and handle and use a PC laptop with a similar spec and tell me that the macbook pro feels inferior. Good design is often subtle and its a lot more than surface packaging - when you use something that is well designed and well built it just feels right and makes you feel good interacting with it. The reaction I see over and over again from people using apple kit (and this goes for techies and non-techies) is a sort of purr of pleasure - people simply like using their stuff - that's why it sells so well, its a big part of why apple is weathering the recession with continued growth.


RE: The Apple Brand.
By Autisticgramma on 8/20/2009 12:45:41 PM , Rating: 2
I haven't read it so I'ma ask, Is possible to secure erase your hard drive on a mac book? Is every Mac users personal data now out in the open? Does getting it out to erase on a system with a floppy void the waranty?

When was the last time you saw screws on the back of a mac book? Not enough interaction for me, not enough for me to even verifiably secure my personal data. yea yea encryption but in the past it has caused me more grief getting to my data.

Imo Apple is like a pretty girl who has just bought your your first drink of the night. Wow is she hot, but will she give you the herp? Probably not, but she still puked on your carpet when you took her back to the pad.

And 3 days later... at the same bar. "Ya know from over here, she still looks damn good. It just so happens I'm unfortunate enough to have a carpet."


The problem
By MonkeyPaw on 8/17/2009 2:00:59 PM , Rating: 2
While it's great someone is trying to fix the problem, it sounds like there are way more people rejecting apps than people investigating the rejected apps. Perhaps this guy should look internally at the rejection process before reaching out to developers. Also, this current approach perpetuates the "squeaky wheel" method of customer service and only reinforces the behavior of people who always get their way by complaining. What this approach doesn't do is approve the good apps--it just brings us the apps made by people who complain the most. From my own experience, the biggest complainers usually have the least to actually complain about, and rarely do they have much value to contribute to every one else.




RE: The problem
By dark matter on 8/17/2009 2:04:59 PM , Rating: 2
Well it is humans who put the thumbs and thumbs down.

One mans meat is another mans poison. Even the judicial judges often interpret the same law differently.

Whilst you still use individuals, then the whole process is going to be influenced by that individuals life experience.


RE: The problem
By Parhel on 8/17/2009 2:51:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
From my own experience, the biggest complainers usually have the least to actually complain about, and rarely do they have much value to contribute to every one else.


It sounds like you're ideologically opposed to complaining in general, rather than discussing the article here. This guy spent months developing an app for the Apple store, only to have it rejected, not for breaking any specific rule, but for being "confusing." Like so many other developers, he had a good faith expectation of having an opportunity to sell his product and maybe make a little money, and instead got an almost arbitrary rejection. I'd complain for as long as it took me to develop the app to anyone who would listen, and then I'd complain some more.


RE: The problem
By Keeir on 8/17/2009 3:19:45 PM , Rating: 2
You know... very few people are looking at this from the Apple point of view.

I see Apple not as being inconsistent, but trying to adapt the rules of the App Store "on the fly".

Clearly, from the original program, they expect to only get a reasonable number of Apps from serious developers, so they pretty much accepted anything that functioned on the phone.

Before too long though the were completely swamped in mostly poor Apps and new request for Apps that were Duplications of currently existing Apps. Which lead I believe to a "Highest Quality Only" and "New Type App" preferences. I mean, are any of the "eReader" applications any better than the Free Stanza with a WiFi connection I can pretty much put any pdf, lit, txt, (or many other formats) onto my iPhone. Why do we need 5-6 free eReader programs that do the same thing? (This is definately not Apple's choice with its other products)

Maybe the best bet would be to completely shut down the process for a few weeks. Design a new App Store layout (I mean, right now you have to essentially search for an App name to get what you want) that better accomindates 10s of Duplicate Apps, retrain/re-envision the approval process, and let developers know some clear guidelines on the approval process.


Great, Apple App Saviors
By Nobleman00 on 8/17/2009 1:38:43 PM , Rating: 2
I can see a "Me So Schiller" app, along with a "Shakin Baby Jesus" app coming soon to a crapp store near you.




RE: Great, Apple App Saviors
By smackababy on 8/17/2009 2:20:17 PM , Rating: 4
If there was a "Shake Baby Jesus" app, I'd buy an iPhone right now.


Not schizo
By dagamer34 on 8/17/2009 3:15:36 PM , Rating: 2
Schizophrenia is a thought disorder. I think you meant bipolar (rapid mood swings). Sorry, I don't mean to be picky, just trying to be more accurate (I'm a medical student, FYI).




RE: Not schizo
By 41A on 8/17/2009 3:30:43 PM , Rating: 2
How long have you had this 'thought disorder' associated with a need to be 'picky' and 'more accurate'? (I'm an engineer, FYI).


RE: Not schizo
By foolsgambit11 on 8/18/2009 3:03:14 AM , Rating: 2
Delusions and disorganized, difficult-to-comprehend speech are two of the signs of schizophrenia. Whether Apple has delusions of grandeur or really is as great as claimed may be in the eye of the beholder, but there can be little doubt that their App-rejection policy is disorganized and difficult-to comprehend.

Although I think the article's author was actually thinking multiple personality disorder, rather than schizophrenia, so common a mistake that psychologists ought to just give up and call actual schizophrenia something else so that multiple personality disorder can be called schizophrenia.


Hmmm..
By sprockkets on 8/17/2009 2:49:14 PM , Rating: 2
You know Mr. Schiller, the easiest solution to your issue, is just allow the iphone to install apps just like every other phone, and via your app store.

But, I know, you just can't let go of your choke hold on your ecosystem.




Micromanagement
By Smilin on 8/17/2009 2:54:40 PM , Rating: 2
So micromanaging this thing is not going to fix it.

You can't just have some exec reading blogs then calling app developers one by one to sort things out.

Although the customers he has spoken with are I'm sure blown away by being contacted by an exec, the fact remains that he shouldn't be doing it. Instead the exec should talk to his own people and get them to fix the process.




Yawn,,,
By kmmatney on 8/17/2009 3:57:51 PM , Rating: 2
As an iPhone owner (work pays for the services, but I paid for the phone so I can keep it) I'm glad that there is some standard set for apps. The last thing I'd want is to install something and screw up my phone. Everything installs and works perfectly, and there are already thousands of Apps out there.

I've yet come across any App that I really wanted, but couldn't install on my phone. The only non-Apple approved App I've installed is one to allow my phone to tether (works great, btw). If would just jailbreak my phone if there was something I really needed, but haven't had any need to do that yet. Are any people who actually own iPhones doing the whining?




Take a chill pill,
By Visual on 8/18/2009 4:48:26 AM , Rating: 2
Mr. Pill Chiller is here to save the day.




By on 8/22/2009 11:31:56 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com

(air jordan, air max, shox tn, rift, puma, dunk sb, adidas) nike jordan shoes 1-24 $32
lv, coach, chane bag $35
COOGI(jeans, tshirts, hoody, jacket) $30
christian audigier(jeans, tshirts, hoody) $13
edhardy(shoes, tshirts, jeans, caps, watche, handbag) $25
Armani(jeans, tshirts,) $24
AF(jeans, coat, hoody, sweater, tshirts)Abercrombie & Fitch $31

quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com




By on 8/22/2009 11:32:18 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com

(air jordan, air max, shox tn, rift, puma, dunk sb, adidas) nike jordan shoes 1-24 $32
lv, coach, chane bag $35
COOGI(jeans, tshirts, hoody, jacket) $30
christian audigier(jeans, tshirts, hoody) $13
edhardy(shoes, tshirts, jeans, caps, watche, handbag) $25
Armani(jeans, tshirts,) $24
AF(jeans, coat, hoody, sweater, tshirts)Abercrombie & Fitch $31

quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com




By on 8/22/2009 11:56:22 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com

(air jordan, air max, shox tn, rift, puma, dunk sb, adidas) nike jordan shoes 1-24 $32
lv, coach, chane bag $35
COOGI(jeans, tshirts, hoody, jacket) $30
christian audigier(jeans, tshirts, hoody) $13
edhardy(shoes, tshirts, jeans, caps, watche, handbag) $25
Armani(jeans, tshirts,) $24
AF(jeans, coat, hoody, sweater, tshirts)Abercrombie & Fitch $31

quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com




By on 8/22/2009 11:57:12 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com

(air jordan, air max, shox tn, rift, puma, dunk sb, adidas) nike jordan shoes 1-24 $32
lv, coach, chane bag $35
COOGI(jeans, tshirts, hoody, jacket) $30
christian audigier(jeans, tshirts, hoody) $13
edhardy(shoes, tshirts, jeans, caps, watche, handbag) $25
Armani(jeans, tshirts,) $24
AF(jeans, coat, hoody, sweater, tshirts)Abercrombie & Fitch $31

quote:
http://www.bbcloth.com
http://www.bbcloth.com




By Pedrom666 on 8/17/2009 3:18:00 PM , Rating: 2
Or just jail break it which is what most WinMo users do when they load a custom ROM.


By Alexstarfire on 8/17/2009 3:45:54 PM , Rating: 3
I don't think you understand those terms very well as they aren't even the same thing.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














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