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Print 45 comment(s) - last by TakinYourPoint.. on Mar 12 at 5:18 AM

Apple rules above the clouds

Gogo is one of the most popular and successful in-flight internet service providers in the world. Now, the company has given some statistics on devices used to connect to its in-flight networks.

The statistics show that 67% of the devices used to connect to Gogo during flights are smartphones and tablets. Tablets are the most preferred device connecting to its network at 35 percent, followed by laptop at 33 percent and smartphones at 33 percent.

The most common mobile operating system that connects to the network during flights comes from Apple with the iPad being the most common device overall. 84% of all devices that connect to the Gogo network during the flight run iOS while 16% use Android.

BlackBerry and Windows Phone/Mobile devices each make up less than 1% of in-flight connections.


The most common task performed using these devices in-flight is average web surfing. Gogo says that passengers are accessing their personal e-mail accounts, using social media sites, checking sports scores, and shopping. Business travelers more often use their work e-mail and finalize reports, listing those two activities as their most frequent tasks during the flight.

With Apple devices so popular during flights, it would come as no surprise that Safari is the most popular browser to access Gogo networks. The second most popular browser is Internet Explorer followed by Chrome and Firefox.
 
While Apple devices are the most common that access Gogo in-flight, Android is catching up. In 2011, only 3.2% of devices accessing the network were Android and so far in 2013, Android accounted for 16% of usage.

Source: Gogo



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My thought...
By 440sixpack on 3/8/13, Rating: 0
RE: My thought...
By Tony Swash on 3/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: My thought...
By Dorkyman on 3/8/2013 2:46:43 PM , Rating: 5
I see a big difference in my usage pattern versus my 22-year-old daughter's pattern.

I have an android phone. I have lots of apps. It's backed up and I have a spare so that if the phone is ever trashed or lost I'm back in business within hours. Just like my PC, which I use daily to actually do money-generating work.

My daughter is constantly texting. She is constantly looking at YouTube videos and Facebook. She will (quite literally) go through withdrawals if she is not connected to the cloud for more than a few minutes. She also uses android but wishes she had an iPhone because most of her young friends have iPhones and to her it's important to be part of the group. Peer status is a powerful factor in her.

Now, which user would happily give up cash for an internet connection on a flight? Unlike my daughter, my cloud connectivity does not dominate my life. I do not have to tell Buffy or Suzie this very minute what Brad just told Jason. OMG! I am also older and appreciate that a dollar saved is a dollar that can be invested for future needs. That fact is sadly not yet in my daughter's mindset.

I know you are a zealot for the Apple POV; fine. Just understand that it's quite likely that Apple is once again making the same mistakes that it made 20 years ago in the PC environment. For better or worse, android will eat their lunch over time. The cool factor only carries you so far. Some people believe Apple will never be cool again now that Jobs is gone. We'll see.


RE: My thought...
By Tony Swash on 3/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: My thought...
By TakinYourPoints on 3/8/2013 4:39:35 PM , Rating: 2
People with high end Android phones also use the internet and download apps. The discrepancy in usage (not just with in-flight wifi but also with global internet traffic) comes from the fact that most Android devices sold are in the low end, and that the iPhone (which is only high-end) outsells other high-end Android devices combined like the GS3, GN2, DNA, etc. The 5:1 difference in iOS/Android marketshare is highly inflated by low end devices sold to low income and developing markets.

Its just numbers, plain and simple. A segment consisting mainly of devices not as capable as a proper smartphone or laptop isn't going to be used like one. That's the side effect of Android being able to be installed on anything; lots of it is being sold on the cheap. Someone with a GS3 is going to be on the internet and downloading apps as much as anyone else with a real smartphone, you know? There just aren't as many out there to match a segment that is nothing but real smartphones.


RE: My thought...
By karlostomy on 3/9/2013 12:50:35 AM , Rating: 2
@ typ

That is actually a good point, but there is more to it.

It is quite possible that android has a lot of lower end users that simply cannot afford inflight wifi and that would also partly explain the disparity of global internet usage.

Having said that, it must also be noted that
quote:
In 2011, only 3.2% of devices accessing the network were Android and so far in 2013, Android accounted for 16% of usage.


Wow.
While apple undoubtedly has the upper hand in usage statistics (for now) this does seems to be changing rapidly.

Simply said, android is currently trouncing ios in market share and also catching up fast in actual usage statistics.
The stats don't lie.

This certainly points to the possibility that some of the traditional apple consumers (that have more disposable income) are now migrating to the android platform.

I guess there is a lot to be said for competition.
Consumers benefit from better features, higher quality products and lower prices.
Eventually consumers realise where the value is and seem to be slowly moving away from apple.


RE: My thought...
By TakinYourPoints on 3/12/2013 5:12:33 AM , Rating: 2
I think it is more a matter that as more Android devices get sold, more of them are inevitably in the high end category. The notion that iDevice users are the ones who use high end features is a silly one. It is all about what the device is capable of, whether it is running iOS or Android or BB or whatever.


RE: My thought...
By TakinYourPoints on 3/12/2013 5:18:44 AM , Rating: 2
The thing to forget is that this isn't about in-flight wifi, these usage statistics reflect overall usage trends. Even with a 5:1 difference in marketshare iOS still makes up over half of mobile traffic, the bulk of app downloads and mobile developer profits, and it even makes up the majority of Google's mobile ad revenue.

Again, it doesn't come down to the user, it comes down to the type of device being used. A GS3 or GN2 gets the same sort of usage that an iPhone does, there just aren't as many out there compared to the lower end devices given out for cheap or free.


RE: My thought...
By headbox on 3/9/2013 12:05:29 AM , Rating: 2
you are a sh!tty parent


RE: My thought...
By alpha754293 on 3/10/2013 3:17:49 AM , Rating: 2
Well...there are two sides to every story - even between you and your daughter.

First off, I run like mini supercomputers for work and do a LOT of engineering analysis work. But when it comes to cell phones (smart or dumb) - I'm at a total loss - much to the amusement of my college housemates and my colleagues.

Also interestingly enough, my friends who are social workers spend more time on their phones (especially if we're going out - which sometimes bug the crap out of me - but that's a different discussion) whereas my phone might as well be off since nearest makes no difference.

That being said though - there ARE advantages to using the same of similiar devices that your friends and/or peers use.

For example, I have friends who have tween/teen kids and sometimes, if I'm asking them for some information (say their parents email address or contact info or something) - it's a LOT easier for me to just hand them my iPhone and I don't have to teach them how to use it. In fact, they can probably teach an old (31-year-old) geezer like me a thing or two about my own device. I just have to tell them what info I want, and how I want them to format the information as they're typing it and the rest - I leave it up to them. And it works. Remarkably well.

So it's NOT always a bad thing. And when it comes to figuring out how to do stuff on the phone or what apps to use etc., if you're one or the other - you can only help so much (since the probability of you being on both is rather slim; unless one's for work and the other's for personal). And so, with my social worker friends; they both have Android phones. And if they ask me questions about it, I'm even MORE useless than if someone just asked me how to use my own phone.


RE: My thought...
By JPForums on 3/11/2013 9:20:51 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
That being said though - there ARE advantages to using the same of similiar devices that your friends and/or peers use ...


Interestingly, this point of view is actually in Android's favor. For you, this may mean it makes since to get an iPhone. However, Android is currently far more prevalent than iOS. With the plethora of low end Android phones saturating the market, and high end Android phones capable of competing with the iPhone, the probability of being affiliated with an Android user is even higher than being affiliated with an iOS user. Granted not all android phones are equal, but they really aren't that different. Besides, the probability still holds up (to a lesser extent) if you look at Samsung vs Apple.

To be clear, I take the view point that people should choose a device that works best for them. If you need a system that is simple and stable, iOS (or Windows Phone) is a good option. If openness, expandability, and feature diversity are your thing, Android's looking pretty good. If you are likely to need a lot of help with your device, get what other people around you have. If you are buying for the social status, pick what makes you look good. That said, I still can't figure out why someone would spend $600+ (even if the price is hidden by contract) on a phone and refuse to figure out how to use it (not to be confuse with those who just need some help). I still haven't got a chance to check out BB10, but from what I have heard, it may put RIM back into contention in the business sector.


Apple
By trajan24 on 3/9/2013 1:35:04 PM , Rating: 2
Apple has ignored their core group of high end power users for a couple of years now. History has shown that this strategy can have disastrous results, as the halo effect fades and high end users find alternatives. Apple should release a NEW Mac Pro with the latest tech and a 17" Macbook Pro with ALL the bells and whistles. Power users do not want to hear that most people don't need blur ray or 16gb of ram is more than enough. Audio visual pros need more. Apple is rich enough and I hope smart enough not to abandon these long time customers, who will happily spend many thousands on their computers.




RE: Apple
By Tony Swash on 3/10/2013 6:40:59 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Apple has ignored their core group of high end power users for a couple of years now. History has shown that this strategy can have disastrous results, as the halo effect fades and high end users find alternatives. Apple should release a NEW Mac Pro with the latest tech and a 17" Macbook Pro with ALL the bells and whistles. Power users do not want to hear that most people don't need blur ray or 16gb of ram is more than enough. Audio visual pros need more. Apple is rich enough and I hope smart enough not to abandon these long time customers, who will happily spend many thousands on their computers.


Although I would personally love to see the new Mac Pro arrive I think that as a product it, and the Mac Pro customers, are far from core. Compared to Apple's main product lines it's a very tiny business.

I am hoping for something radical in the new Pro line. With Thunderbolt I wondered if they could move to a modular system and dispense with the 'big metal box that can hold everything' approach. Something more Lego like.

The other intriguing report I saw this week (sorry lost link) was about someone visiting a manufacturing complex very recently and witnessing the production of Apple branded 2TB SSDs. I wondered if that was linked to this:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5258/apple-acquires-...


84%
By Trisped on 3/8/2013 2:00:43 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Tablets are the most preferred device connecting to its network at 35 percent, followed by laptop at 33 percent and smartphones at 33 percent.
quote:
84% of all devices that connect to the Gogo network during the flight run iOS while 16% use Android.
So all laptops either run iOS or Android? Or are they trying to claim that laptops are not devices?




By BifurcatedBoat on 3/9/2013 3:03:18 PM , Rating: 2
The profile of somebody who would pay the premium for in-flight internet sounds like it would match the profile of an Apple user.




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By EmilyGrands22 on 3/9/2013 8:22:32 PM , Rating: 2
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This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: This not that surprising
By Fleeb on 3/8/2013 9:29:26 AM , Rating: 3
I see. That is why Apple used to be so proud of their market share. Now the goal post is actually a different one.


RE: This not that surprising
By R3T4rd on 3/8/2013 9:51:52 AM , Rating: 2
Fail on soo many points. Sheeps will be sheeps.


RE: This not that surprising
By Nutzo on 3/8/2013 1:49:44 PM , Rating: 2
Looks like the Apple fanboys just can't handle the truth.

Apple products are more expensive - fact
Apple users spend more on apps - fact

People generally buy Android phones/tablets because they are less expensive.
People who are looking for cheaper products are less likely to spend even more money on apps or expensive wireless service on a plane.


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/8/13, Rating: 0
RE: This not that surprising
By karlostomy on 3/9/2013 2:19:28 AM , Rating: 2
Hmmm,

Tony, it's disconcerting that you are downplaying the suddenly burgeoning gap in marketshare between android and apple ios.
I would suggest that growing marketshare is always a good thing. How can it possibly be a bad thing? Now before you get all huffy, read on.

Marketshare is a precursor to revenue and profits.
For proof of this, look at the 'loss leader' business model of the ps3 and xbox360. For years, both Sony and MS bent over backwards to establish market share, because marketshare is what it's all about . Both of those companies established this business model because they knew that profits flow from market share, eventually.

Interestingly, apple is being walloped by android in terms of marketshare as of right now.

While Apple may have the upper hand in generating revenue for third party business at present, this may be a result of the prior product infrastructure that apple developed as a result of its prior marketshare dominance. There simply was nothing that competed with apple phone and tablet for a long time.

Now, a new player is in town and really taking marketshare away from apple. This much is fact. As such, the previous apple infrastructure that allowed third party business to thrive, is diminishing and being made available to android.
I would wager this shift will take some time though.

The article has already pointed us toward some evidence that this trend is occurring right now:
quote:
In 2011, only 3.2% of devices accessing the network were Android and so far in 2013, Android accounted for 16% of usage.


Not only is android taking over in terms of market share but consumers are also starting to spend more money within the android ecosystem.
Sure, not near apple spending yet, but give it some time.

Third party business will pick up on this evidence soon enough, even if you don't want to believe or admit it.


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/9/2013 5:49:58 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Marketshare is a precursor to revenue and profits.


Except when it isn't. Symbian.

quote:
For proof of this, look at the 'loss leader' business model of the ps3 and xbox360. For years, both Sony and MS bent over backwards to establish market share, because marketshare is what it's all about . Both of those companies established this business model because they knew that profits flow from market share, eventually.


Except in neither case did the profits actually flow (neither investment has delivered a return on capital) and in neither case do the respective platforms have a majority share of the market.

The problem is that market share was such a good proxy for measuring relative platform performance for so long during the PC era that most people forget it was always just a proxy measurement of something else (commercial success, platform utilisation, third party support etc). Now that we are faced with a mass mobile device market where the connection between platform success and market share is much flimsier a lot of people get a bit disorientated. They start to think market share is a great thing in and of itself. Again consider Symbian.

As for Android catching up iOS in platform performance, given the multipliers involved it looks like Android needs a minimum of a two to three billion installed base just to match iOS. That's going to take a while


RE: This not that surprising
By karlostomy on 3/9/2013 9:28:45 PM , Rating: 2
Tony, you have inadvertently actually supported my original premise about the importance of marketshare:

Market share is everything. Your examples do nothing to negate that statement.

The ps3 and 360 prove that point. Neither of them had overwhelming market share. I merely used them as an eample of how important it is for major corporations to establish marketshare.

That symbian comparison is an interesting one. I would agree that this might be a good example that marketshare, as you suggest, is not an absolute guarantee of record profits.
However, factual evidence suggests that in android's case there is a growing trend of increased consumer spending and third party participation that was not evident on Symbian during its day.
Interestingly, ios market share (and gradually consumer spending) is being usurped by android, much like Symbian's market share was usurped by android in its day.
The evidence supports this.

I encourage you to think about that for a while.

With regard to the premise of the importance of market share for big business:
Corporations actively pursue overwhelming marketshare (yes, including apple!) because they know it is the first step in generating those record profits via consumer participation and third party support. The fact that some corporations don't succeed in establishing the overwhelming marketshare, or don't fully capitalise on marketshare when it is established (symbian) doesn't negate the premise itself.

For a better example of overwhelming marketshare and resulting profits and third party support, consider these products:
- ps2
- Windows during the 90s
- ios in the last few years.

All of the above had overwhelming marketshare and as a result generated substantial profits and third party support - some faster than others. For every one market failure like 'symbian' you care to mention there are about ten other cases that support my view.

Let's not kid ourselves:
Apple has had its day and is losing its marketshare to android, just like symbian did. I am not saying 'teh applez is doomed' or any such rubbish. Apple is still currently making record profits as a result of its past dominant marketshare, clever marketing and better implementation of established ideas from days gone by. However, as the ios marketshare continues to shrink, it will inevitably lead to lost support from consumers and third party suppliers.

That's not rocket science, even for apple fans.

I do agree with you though that it may take a few more years for this slow transition to android consumer penetration and profit realisation to take effect.

The best thing about this though, is that it is the consumer that benefits, not the corporation.
For some reason you seem to struggle with this concept.


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 10:42:03 AM , Rating: 2
"Why Android users actually use their platform less than iOS users"

Actually Tony, this (like most of your past arguments" needs to be retired as well. The latest #'s are out and now Android has surpassed IOS in usage as well.

http://www.itechpost.com/articles/6320/20130309/an...

Google is on the rise, and Apple is on the decline. Hey wouldnt it be funny if your prediction of the worlds favorite tech company stock hitting $1000 mark came true, only the opposite? Because Google just might get there soon. Wouldnt that just burn? ;)

http://www.cnbc.com/id/100537856


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/10/2013 12:49:27 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Actually Tony, this (like most of your past arguments" needs to be retired as well. The latest #'s are out and now Android has surpassed IOS in usage as well.

http://www.itechpost.com/articles/6320/20130309/an...


I couldn't work out from your link what was being measured and by who. All the data based referenced evidence shows the same, iOS users utilise their platform to do significantly more per user than Android users. Huffing and puffing won't change that.


RE: This not that surprising
By momorere on 3/10/2013 1:30:41 PM , Rating: 2
Of course you can't read it properly as it is yet another article that proves you wrong based on your selective "facts". Since you like Business Insider and Forbes so much, I thought I'd show you a few interesting articles from them.

We all know that the "iWatch" rumors are just a pathetic attempt to keep investors interested for a little longer.

http://news.yahoo.com/forbes-apple-may-planted-iwa...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2013/...

You have said numerous times how crApple is moving into the enterprise sector and is starting to take over yet, Samsung is getting in with some of the largest enterprise customers.

http://www.businessinsider.com/american-airlines-p...

Even some of the top crApple writers/bloggers are making the switch.

http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-fanboy-loves-...

http://www.businessinsider.com/why-ihnatko-switche...


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 3:13:58 PM , Rating: 2
"Of course you can't read it properly as it is yet another article that proves you wrong based on your selective "facts".

Exactly... When you post selective facts, its easy to see your are trying to mislead people... When you actually start believing in them, its a whole other direction. I wonder which Tony really is.


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/10/2013 8:01:59 PM , Rating: 2
The link you posted points to an article that contains the following statistic:

quote:
All that has changed now that Androids make up an astonishing 37 percent of the usage share in comparison to Apple's 25 percent share.


It doesn't say of what.

So I followed the link to the linked Motely Fool article which says:

quote:
Fast-forward a few months later and Android's usage share has reached 37%, far above Apple's approximate 25% share.


Again I ask - what was measured and how was it measured.?

The article seems fact and data free. What web usage is being measured, how is it being measured? Without quoting sources you can claim anything. I can claim that 76% of iPhobes have inferiority complexes, it sounds plausible to me but with no data sources to back it up it's nothing more than my opinion.

I suppose it's the difference between the lightweight tabloid end of tech journalism, which unsurprisingly the iPhobes seem to prefer, and the quality end of tech journalism (such as the excellent Asymco site) which is full of data and data source references, which iOS users tend to prefer. Brandishing stereotypes is such fun.

http://techpinions.com/does-the-rise-of-androids-m...


RE: This not that surprising
By momorere on 3/10/2013 8:26:03 PM , Rating: 2
Aww, no comments on my links ? I was waiting for them to get Swashed. So I'm assuming that all my Forbes and Business Insider links are invalid EXCEPT when they are pro-crApple ? Geez, who would have thought ?


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 3:10:34 PM , Rating: 2
"I couldn't work out from your link what was being measured and by who"

Of course not. Put in a good dish of denial and its easy not underdstand anything that is going on. GEt used to it though, because its happening, and you will see more and more of it, so prepare your spin now. Let me spell it out for you... The odd argument you keep using of utilization is done, over, move on, Android has caught up. It caught up in sales, then it caught up in features, then it surpassed in both. Then it caught up in hardware and caught up in smooth fluent UI then it surpassed in both. Then it caught up in software/apps and utilization... I will leave the nest step to your imagination.

The point is, regardless of your huffing and puffing, Android is a juggernaut that cannot be avoided. It is not only cheaper, it is better and people are catching on. It will catch up and surpass in all angles eventually unless something better comes along to knock it off. With its ony real competitor meandering away its lead and regurgitating the same products with hardly noticeable impreovements, it seems it happening faster and faster. Better get your spin prepared for that too.

Here is a tidbit for you. Analysts are expecting year over year Apples sales to decrease and profits to decrease for the current quarter. The 1st time since the iPhones release. Get your spin ready for that one too, cuz its coming.

Better yet, try and be a man and detach your sense of self worth from a company and put it where it belongs, back on yourself. Remove Apple and you are a pretty cool, sensible guy with a good head. Add Apple, and you start reeking of fanboyism, denial and blindness.


RE: This not that surprising
By Cheesew1z69 on 3/10/2013 5:49:28 PM , Rating: 2
Android is a failure, Tony says it so it must be true!


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 10:27:23 PM , Rating: 2
I believe he called Android a "spectacular failure" LOL... What he is really worried about is IOS repeating the same path that Mac did. That's OK. He can huff and puff all he wants, that fact is that Android is the # 1 mobile OS. As an OS and a platform it is firing on all pistons. Its improving sang growing by leaps and bounds while the competition stagnates.


RE: This not that surprising
By BifurcatedBoat on 3/9/2013 3:10:09 PM , Rating: 2
In-flight internet just sounds like something that an Apple user would do. I'm not an Apple user type, so I'd be less inclined to pay for in-flight internet, but it's not because I'm cheap; I'd be more inclined to pay for faster internet at home for example.

Why is this? I believe it's because Apple users tend to be less technical, less inclined to require good value for the money they spend, and more likely to derive enjoyment out of the fact that they can take their device - which they are proud of - and use it from 30,000 feet. The wonderment of being able to do that makes it worth it for them.

It doesn't impress me, so I just see it as a waste of money. I can bring enough content with me on my device to tide me over for a couple hours and save $20.


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/9/2013 7:17:24 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why is this? I believe it's because Apple users tend to be less technical, less inclined to require good value for the money they spend, and more likely to derive enjoyment out of the fact that they can take their device - which they are proud of - and use it from 30,000 feet. The wonderment of being able to do that makes it worth it for them.


Either you have managed to discover that the 500 million Apple users around the world are all astonishingly and eerily similar.

or

You could be seeking an answer to a challenging, complex and ultimately disturbing phenomena which avoids thinking about things as they actually are in the real world by retreating into comforting but delusional fantasies that involves trying to crowbar hundreds of millions of diverse people from all around the world in to silly and clumsy stereotypes of your own imagining.

I know which one my money is on :)

Only a dedicated Fandroid could turn platform under utilisation into a positive characteristic.


What's Being Measured Here?
By lightfoot on 3/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: What's Being Measured Here?
By Tony Swash on 3/8/2013 9:57:29 AM , Rating: 1
Your response can be summarised as:

This survey is inaccurate

The differential platform use behaviour of Apple and Android users is because there is something wrong with Apple users
(Is it really surprising that Apple users are addicted to the internet and lack the impulse control to step away from it for only a few hours?)

I want to focus on the question of whether this survey is painting an inaccurate picture of the pattern of platform utilisation but before I do I should point out that whether this is the result of platform characteristics (the more likely explanation) or the dubious personal characteristics of Apple users (less likely) is completely moot. Whatever the explanation the outcome is the same. One platform is performing better than the other, one platform supports far more activity than the other, one platform is generating far more revenues for third parties than the other.

Turning to the issue of whether this particular survey is indicative of a more generalised phenomena this survey might have carried less weight if it were not for the fact that multiple measures of platform utilisation and engagement all show the same pattern of high iOS engagement and use, and low Android engagement and use.

Here are some examples, there are many more.

The developer perspective.

http://blog.flurry.com/bid/94811/Are-Indie-App-Dev...

Looking at the data that developers use to target the most lucrative market segment:

"Device models running on the iOS platform average 14 times the number of active users than device models running on other platforms.

In addition to having more active devices per device model than other platforms, iOS device models average more app sessions per active device than device models running on other platforms. This is shown below, again using an index for which app sessions per active Android device are set to one. This further clarifies why developer support for iOS is disproportionate to iOS’ share of the installed device base. Developers can reach more active devices by developing for a smaller number of device models on iOS and they can also capture the attention of very active users. People who have iOS devices tend to have more app sessions, creating more opportunities for in app purchases, advertising revenue and paid app purchases"


The analysis of patterns of advertising engagement by the Opera browser people.

http://www.opera.com/sma/2012/q2/

This shows 61% of advertising income coming from iOS compared to only 26% from Android

The global availability of digital content by all the major platforms

http://www.macstories.net/stories/mapping-the-ente...

"Whichever company is the “winner” depends on your circumstances (location, device, etc), but if you were to generally draw a conclusion I think it is clear that Apple would lead, Microsoft would be second, Google third and Amazon fourth."

Apple iPhone gamers spend five times more than Android gamers

http://www.slashgear.com/apple-iphone-gamers-spend...

90% of e-commerce revenue comes from iOS devices

http://blogs.computerworld.com/mobile-oses/20633/a...

BTW I was particularly interested, and I have to say amused, by this seemingly non-sensical observation you made

quote:
After all, what is the point in owning an Apple device if you can't be seen in public using an Apple device. It's about the status more than the functionality.


which seems to be arguing that lower use of a device indicates better functionality. That's a stretch :)


RE: What's Being Measured Here?
By lightfoot on 3/8/2013 10:11:17 AM , Rating: 3
Your whole post seems to say that if a platform costs more for the user to use, it is a better platform. That is simply not true. Just because an Android user subscribes to fewer paid services and buys less crapware in an App store does not make one platform superior to the other.

I never said the study was inaccurate, just that the environment (on an airline where it is against federal law to use any service except the paid service) is not a valid environment in which to conduct such a survey.

Heck, the use pattern may just indicate that Apple users don't know how to put their device into "Airplane Mode." It never even states that these are paid users of the service, only that they are trying to check their email and such.


RE: What's Being Measured Here?
By retrospooty on 3/8/2013 11:59:15 AM , Rating: 2
Tony will never get it. It's not about the money the company or app developers make, its about what YOU get as the consumer. With Android, you get far more, period. If you are an investor, Apple is definitely doing well... Well, until the latter half of last year anyhow ;)


RE: What's Being Measured Here?
By Tony Swash on 3/8/13, Rating: 0
By retrospooty on 3/8/2013 4:48:28 PM , Rating: 2
"What interests me is the bigger picture."

BS... What interests you is Apple, plain and simple. You dont care about the tech, or the industry or the products. You care about Apple, and only Apple. You will derail any real conversation with your prejudiced Apple bias and ignore any and all assets from any competitor. You are quite the opposite of someone that cares about "the industry". Don't act like you are here for any other reason... years worth of your posts prove otherwise.


By retrospooty on 3/8/2013 4:59:33 PM , Rating: 2
"why not show me the same courtesy and if you are not interested in what I am talking about just move on rather than feeling compelled to disrupt the discussion"

Pfapf, to the highest possible extent. Every discussion that goes on here about any company that you feel is a threat to Apple gets interrupted with your pre-determined drivel. You jump into any conversation about Google or Samsung and throw in totally unrelated crap to try and change the subject make them appear worse and Apple better in any and all situations... Everyone here sees that Tony. You are as much of a hippocrit as the company you defend. The very thought you YOU saying anyone else "disrupts" the conversation is laughable. Again, years worth of your posts proves it.


RE: What's Being Measured Here?
By R3T4rd on 3/8/2013 10:15:26 AM , Rating: 2
So you are saying, Apple product owners waste more money. We all knew that already. More useless information spewage by Tony.

Lets see going from a Galaxy S, HTC EVO, and various other phones to a Glaxy SIII and even other products, I have had to buy only one charger and car adapter which is $5-$15. Apple users, buy dozens of different chargers that cost $30-$100 each, but wait, they have to buy this all over again if they switched to the new iPhone5. Apple Marketing team is truly a bunch of genious or Apple owners are truly blind. And to think, my example is only phone chargers.


By TakinYourPoints on 3/8/2013 4:51:45 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I have had to buy only one charger and car adapter which is $5-$15. Apple users, buy dozens of different chargers that cost $30-$100 each, but wait, they have to buy this all over again if they switched to the new iPhone5. [...] And to think, my example is only phone chargers.


Dock connector chargers cost $30-$100 and people buy dozens of them, really? And a Lightning connector that comes with an iPhone 5 or can be had on Monoprice or Amazon for just a few bucks, also $100 I'm assuming.

I know hyperbole and stretching the truth is a thing on the internet, but geez...


RE: What's Being Measured Here?
By R3T4rd on 3/8/2013 10:04:59 AM , Rating: 3
Ding Ding Ding!

A better measurement would be infact, busy "free" WiFi spots.

Not everyone wants to pay for slow internet at a premium. Nor do some of us have a need to be connected all the time. There are other things in life other than SOCIAL NETWORKS and rhetorical consumable electronics to look forward to.


“So far we have not seen a single Android device that does not infringe on our patents." -- Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith











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