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Amazon claims its new Kindle is the easiest to read e-book reader, with 50 percent more contrast than any other reader on the market.  (Source: Amazon)

Retailing for $139 (Wi-Fi only) and $189 (3G, Wi-Fi) the new, third-generation Kindle is the cheapest Amazon reader yet.  (Source: Amazon)

It weighs 15 percent less than the second generation model and is 21 percent smaller, while keeping the screen size the same.  (Source: Amazon)
Device launches August 27th, preserves well-liked E Ink technology

The new Wi-Fi only Kindle from Amazon.com has hit quite the sweet price point -- $139 USD -- roughly a third of the e-book reader's original 2007 launch cost.

However, Amazon's third generation Kindle e-book reader, announced on Wednesday, is perhaps more notable for what changes it didn't make than what changes were made.  The reader features numerous small improvements, but overall remains remarkably similar to past designs.  Notably, it retains the well-liked E-Ink display, despite rumors of considering a color LCD display.

The new device lands amid a more packed market.  There's Sony's e-book readers and the Kobo e-book reader, both supported by a variety of parties, including Border's new launched e-book site.  There's Barnes & Noble's hot Nook reader.  And there's device like the Apple iPhone and iPad that are trying to lure customers away from dedicated devices with e-book reader apps.

Still, Amazon holds about 60 percent of the market (followed by Sony with 35 percent).

The new graphite-colored device, which is dubbed just plain "Kindle" like Amazon's original reader, will air August 27th in the U.S. and UK replacing the second generation Kindle international version.

The price of the new reader will be $139 for a Wi-Fi version and $189 for a model with both 3G and Wi-Fi.  That's in line with the current generation's month-old price (for the 3G model).  In June Barnes & Noble slashed its Nook price from $259 to $199, so Amazon responded by slashing the Kindle 2 Wi-Fi and 3G prices to $139 and $189, respectively.  Before that the Kindle 2 was cut from its launch price of $359 to $299 in July 2009 and in October 2009 further cut to $259.  The original Kindle was launched in November 2007 priced at $399.

UK versions will retail for £109 and £149.  The UK version will reportedly be supported by Vodafone.

In the U.S. the 3G service on the device will still be provided exclusively by AT&T, which recent independent tests have shown to be the fastest and have the best signal in terms of data network in most regions.

Internal Memory gets a big bump from 1.4 GB (Kindle 2) to 4 GB, matching its big brother the Kindle DX.  The screen size remains unchanged -- 6-inches diagonal -- but the refresh times are faster and it has better contrast (Amazon claims it has "50% better contrast than any other e-reader").  The battery life has also been improved to 1 month without wireless, and 10 days with the wireless turned on.

There's slight tweaks to the button and keyboard layout.  And the overall body size has been reduced 21 percent and the weight was reduced 15 percent to 8.7 ounces  And software-wise there's a new experimental browser.

But Amazon.com has adamantly refused to ditch its E-Ink display for a more colorful, faster LCD display.  While refresh times on E-Ink may be slower, they offer much less eyestrain, meaning that most customers consider them better at long campaigns of what the Kindle is all about -- reading.  In that department Amazon is well ahead of LCD based competitors like the iPad.

States
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, "For the vast majority of books, adding video and animation is not going to be helpful. It is distracting rather than enhancing. You are not going to improve Hemingway by adding video snippets," adding later, "there are going to be 100 companies making LCD [screen] tablets... why would we want to be 101? I like building a purpose-built reading device. I think that is where we can make a real contribution."

The device is available here [Wi-Fi] [3G]  for preorder.

For customers looking for a bigger screen, the Kindle DX is available.  With similar specs to the third generation Kindle, the third generation Kindle DX sells for $379 and comes with a 9.7-inch screen (an older model Kindle DX is currently available for $359).


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$139 isn't bad...
By inperfectdarkness on 7/29/2010 4:44:12 AM , Rating: 2
...but i'd still have to do a LOT of reading just to break even on the cost.




RE: $139 isn't bad...
By hughlle on 7/29/2010 7:54:31 AM , Rating: 2
I would have bined the thing before i'd read that much material on a device like this. Sorry but i need the feel of a book.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By theapparition on 7/29/2010 8:41:44 AM , Rating: 5
And how would 20 books feel if you wanted to bring them on a trip with you?

Some find value with an entire library being condensed into one device.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Homerboy on 7/29/10, Rating: 0
RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 9:31:47 AM , Rating: 4
I don't know, why do you bring 32Gigs of music with you on a trip?

You won't listen to ALL of it.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Aikouka on 7/29/2010 10:18:16 AM , Rating: 3
I touched on it in a different comment in here, but it might be worth it to go into it more here...

I get where the whole "32GB of music" spiel comes from, but honestly... music is not a good comparison to books. Why? Because most people aren't weird like me and listen to the same song over and over :P. People usually bring a vast amount of music simply for the diversity, but the thing is... you typically just read one book at a time and if that book is of a significant length, are you going to necessarily finish it during a single trip? If so, do you need more than just two books?

The basic idea is that we usually focus on one book at a time and music listening tends to involve a lot of random tracks where diversity is key.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 11:12:52 AM , Rating: 5
Your point is a good one and on my own I would agree.

However my wife is an avid reader and I've witnessed her leveraging this killer feature.

I think if you have to ask the question "why would I bring x books?" then you're not the kind of person that would understand the answer. That's not a bad thing on you or a cop-out on this debate. I would be in the same position had I not witnessed the answer ahead of time.

I hope this makes sense and doesn't come off wrong. Here, smiley.. :)


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By theapparition on 7/29/2010 2:13:35 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
think if you have to ask the question "why would I bring x books?" then you're not the kind of person that would understand the answer.

Exactly right. Here's some other scenerios where this makes sense.

Suggest that instead of books, you'd like to read your favorite local paper while on travel, or you're a college student and need available reference material or actual textbooks on the go. This device is not limited to the bestsellers list of books.

There's a million reasons why this is a good idea. If you don't like it, then don't buy it, simple as that.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By esandrs on 7/29/2010 4:12:44 PM , Rating: 2
I agree with this, and would use the feature as this poster's wife. I'm often in the middle of 5-7 different books at once -- rarely reading only one.

I'd love a Kindle/Nook, but atm I'm just too cheap!


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By ElderTech on 7/29/2010 8:02:22 PM , Rating: 3
For those of us allergic to paper dust and printer's ink, particularly from the cheap books published today, a reader like this is an enormous benefit, particularly at this cost. The only decision is which format to choose.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By cjohnson2136 on 7/30/2010 10:11:25 AM , Rating: 3
I agree my fiancee is book crazy. She will easily read a 500-600 page book in a day. We have two lare book shelves full of books and personally I would like to get rid of these books that is why a Kindle will be her Christmas gift this year.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Ard on 7/29/2010 9:40:58 AM , Rating: 3
It's not the point of needing twenty books on a trip, but the concept of having access to those twenty books. It's no different than having a PMP. Do you need 80GB worth of music/videos on a week long trip? Are you going to watch/listen to all of that? No, it's literally impossible. But I bet you like the idea that you have access to your collection at any given moment and listen/watch what you're feeling at that time.

The same idea applies to the Kindle. I'll make it more practical though. Let's say you take a 2-week trip to a beach location. Most people, even while spending time with their spouses, like to read while they lay on the beach together. You could easily blow through 5 books in a 2-week period of time. Stuffing multiple books in a suitcase isn't fun and adds a decent amount of weight. The Kindle reduces that to one slim device that holds your entire library.

It's the convenience.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Aikouka on 7/29/2010 10:05:54 AM , Rating: 2
I'm not much of a reader myself, but my brother tends to read often enough, so I've considered buying him one of these (in the future) as a gift. But I sat down and thought about it...

1) I don't think most people usually bring more than one or two books with them on a trip, so does this truly save room? While a song is only a 3 minute affair and we usually have completely random tastes, we tend to read a single book at a time. If we're near the end, we take the next book on our mental list.

2) The lack of a built-in light means this doesn't provide as much of a benefit over books in regard to low-light (or no light) reading. I recall seeing a man on a jet have to constantly fiddle with his Kindle's book light to get it just right during a late night flight.

3) It can't do anything else. Well, this may not be as true, since this says it has an experimental browser, but if I'm looking at the Kindle vs say... an iPad or another tablet PC, it'd be nice to offer more than just the capability to read books, because sometimes we just feel like doing something a little different from time to time and it gives the device a little more use. But if you compare costs, other devices may completely eclipse these eReaders... such as the iPad's $500 price tag compared to the Kindle's low price. That's quite a chunk of change for offering a few more things to do!

4) This is really a situational reason, but I recall that my brother's purchased a lot of second-hand books... mostly in the fantasy genre. I have no idea if these books are even available in an electronic format and he'd probably have to pay a decent amount more to buy them "new" rather than used.

These four points have really held me back from choosing one of these as a gift and I think #1 really applies to the whole "you can't carry 20 books with you" talk. I might be more interested in say a ... $200-250 tablet PC running Android as that'd fix #3 and still keep a decent price tag.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By nafhan on 7/29/2010 10:18:23 AM , Rating: 2
My thoughts on your reasons.
1) You don't need to pack a book or go to the store before vacation or a trip. Bring the Kindle, and pick it out and buy it when you are ready to start reading.
2) Books have the same problem. If you're going to be reading mostly in low light, it's not the best choice.
3) For people who need to get work done or do real computing, they're already carrying a laptop on a trip. In which case, a Kindle + a laptop would be almost as good and a lot cheaper than iPad + laptop.
4) This is why I won't buy a Kindle or eBook reader, now. I go through a ton of books, and buy used or borrow most of them. I probably get about half my books through Paperbackswap, which costs me media mail shipping (about $2) per book.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By mcnabney on 7/29/2010 10:20:18 AM , Rating: 3
A key benefit to the eReaders is the display. That display is very easy on the eyes (versus reading on an iPad or computer monitor which will enduce eyestrain) and has a battery life measured in weeks.

The best device for you might be the Android-based Adam padlike device which will hopefully get to market soon. It has a display that can be switched from a color, backlit TFT to a greyscale, reflective eInk display. Best of both worlds.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 10:21:35 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
1) I don't think most people usually bring more than one or two books with them on a trip, so does this truly save room? While a song is only a 3 minute affair and we usually have completely random tastes, we tend to read a single book at a time. If we're near the end, we take the next book on our mental list.


They only bring that many because that's how many they can. Besides even if they only brought one it would be a benefit. Although more than a paperback the kindle is substantially lighter and smaller than a single hardbound.
One hardbound doesn't sound like much but go put it in your backpack while you hike through airports. It sucks!

quote:
2) The lack of a built-in light means this doesn't provide as much of a benefit over books in regard to low-light (or no light) reading. I recall seeing a man on a jet have to constantly fiddle with his Kindle's book light to get it just right during a late night flight.


I've never seen a book with a built in light either. Do they now suck?

quote:
3) It can't do anything else. Well, this may not be as true, since this says it has an experimental browser, but if I'm looking at the Kindle vs say... an iPad or another tablet PC, it'd be nice to offer more than just the capability to read books, because sometimes we just feel like doing something a little different from time to time and it gives the device a little more use. But if you compare costs, other devices may completely eclipse these eReaders... such as the iPad's $500 price tag compared to the Kindle's low price. That's quite a chunk of change for offering a few more things to do!


So? The kindle does other things (mp3 player) but for the sake of argument lets just say it does nothing else at all. Who cares? It does the thing that you want and it does it better than ANYTHING out there. You brought up iPad so lets look:

1. iPad is f'n heavy. Seriously if you read laying on your back your arm is gonna fall off before you finish half a book.
2. The iPad is hot. So hot you can't use it outdoors on a hot day.
3. The iPad display sucks. It's worthless in bright light and at night the backlight is insomnia inducing.
4. The battery life sucks. You can take a Kindle on a weeklong trip without a charger.
5. You have to pay just to connect the thing to the bookstore. No FREE 3g
6. It costs more.
7. It costs a lot more. How many books until the break even? 100? Oh you got the 3G version? 170? holy crap!
8. The display sucks. Did I say that? It does.

quote:
4) This is really a situational reason, but I recall that my brother's purchased a lot of second-hand books... mostly in the fantasy genre. I have no idea if these books are even available in an electronic format and he'd probably have to pay a decent amount more to buy them "new" rather than used.


No ebook reader will ever replace the 50 cent used book. But, with ebook readers you're going to find VAST numbers of free books.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Aikouka on 7/29/2010 11:24:39 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
They only bring that many because that's how many they can. Besides even if they only brought one it would be a benefit. Although more than a paperback the kindle is substantially lighter and smaller than a single hardbound.
One hardbound doesn't sound like much but go put it in your backpack while you hike through airports. It sucks!


I agree with the hardcover books, but most people opt for the cheaper paperback copies :). The point of mentioning one or two books is better explained by another comment I mentioned here. The idea is that you usually just read one book at a time. To compare book reading to music, it'd be akin to reading a few pages in one book, then switching to another book for only a few pages and continuing with that paradigm for the entire time. It's not a logical association because of the randomness in how users typically listen to music and the brevity of music.

quote:
I've never seen a book with a built in light either. Do they now suck?


I think my second point has been misconstrued a couple times... sigh, what I wouldn't do for an edit button to help clear it up! :)

The point I made is that the Kindle offers no benefit over a book in regard to night time reading. No, of course books don't have built-in lights, but neither does the Kindle... that is the problem. The issue is also that tablet PCs have backlit displays, which while offering worse battery life, they don't require fiddling with book lights.

quote:
So? The kindle does other things (mp3 player) but for the sake of argument lets just say it does nothing else at all. Who cares? It does the thing that you want and it does it better than ANYTHING out there. You brought up iPad so lets look:


I'm not really sure why you focused so much on the iPad. It was just an example and I even mentioned that it costs significantly more than the Kindle does (nearly 3x the price). A few of your points seem a little odd... such as reading outside... on a hot day.

It's a little off topic, but I never understood that litigation article... why would people want to sit outside on a 80-90 degree day and read? It wouldn't take long to get sweaty and uncomfortable from the heat and/or humidity.

But anyway, personally, I wouldn't worry so much about battery life, unless I were on a rather long (International) flight.

The idea of me saying that all it can do is read books is that the majority of what you're going to use it for is reading books. You don't take out a Kindle to listen to music, do you? You might turn on music while reading a book with it, sure. But for the most part, you're spending X dollars on a book reader. If you get a tablet PC and do more with it than just use it as a book reader, then you are spending X + Y dollars where if Y isn't too pricey for what it offers (including cons such as lower battery life), it can possibly prop the tablet PC above the eReader.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 12:07:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's a little off topic, but I never understood that litigation article... why would people want to sit outside on a 80-90 degree day and read? It wouldn't take long to get sweaty and uncomfortable from the heat and/or humidity.


Ask yourself: In all of the universe where is the best place to read a book? Hint: you'll be appropriately dressed for the heat.

quote:
If you get a tablet PC and do more with it than just use it as a book reader, then you are spending X + Y dollars where if Y isn't too pricey for what it offers (including cons such as lower battery life), it can possibly prop the tablet PC above the eReader.


Having used both a tablet (iPad in particular) and an eReader (kindle) I really don't even consider the tablet to be an eReader. It's such a poor experience compared to an eReader that it just doesn't count.

Therefore if I bought a tablet I would still have to buy an eReader. It might make a substitute in an emergency but there is no way I would buy a tablet for the purpose of reading books.

So no matter what fancy stuff it does it doesn't do the one thing I want...so it's useless.

If I own eReader then yes I have to buy another device to do other "stuff".
But if I own another device already to do "stuff" then I'll still need to buy an eReader to read books.

You're stuck with two devices either way.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Fritzr on 7/30/2010 8:37:30 PM , Rating: 2
My personal library of paperbacks is now at around 1700 titles. My PRS-500 is much easier to take on the plane as carry on baggage than the 22 boxes it takes to pack the books up for travel.

Now add the magazines & assorted other publications that are not counted as paperback titles and my Sony PRS-500 suddenly starts making cents.

Now that I am buying e-books, the prices have been averaging about $1.50 LESS per title and I can buy titles not carried by local bookstores without waiting weeks for special orders or paying extra for shipping.

I paid $122.50 for a used PRS-500. Due to the price difference on purchases it is already paid off. In addition to that I have 40 or 50 titles that I downloaded free. Some of those have been out of print for more than a century. Try ordering one of those titles at your local Hastings Book & Video :)

As far as backlighting goes...under any conditions you would be reading a paper book, the backlight will be an unnecessary drain on the battery. For those occasions where a lamp is needed, I use the same solution I use when reading regular books ... a lamp ... low tech and not geeky I know, but I have found that a lamp works wonderfully well for reading. When traveling a clip on booklight works as well with an e-reader as it does with a hardback. Those little clip-ons are lousy with an ordinary paperback, so the e-reader is much better in that category.

As for carrying 1 or 2 books ... the last time I went on a trip, I was on an airplane for a total of 18 hours each way & spend several hours at airports on the way. I read all 8 of the books I took before the flight back and had to explain to airport security why I had so many paperbacks...they thought it was suspicious that a traveler would carry more than 1 or 2 titles. The length of the trip clarified matters, but with an e-reader it would never have come up.

Then there are other hazards. The last time I saw 3 out of print books from my personal collection they were southbound on a Greyhound Bus, never to be seen again. Another one I have is in bad shape, but is still readable. dropped in a tub.

Do either of those to an e-reader and you may be investing in an upgrade, but your books remain in your possession undamaged :)

For me even the $500 e-readers are cheap now that there are low cost e-books available and simple methods for converting my personal collection to e-book files.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By bhieb on 7/29/2010 10:43:37 AM , Rating: 2
I went through some of the same thoughts before I bought my wife one. Here is my insights.

1. Why don't you bring more than 1 or 2? Most likely space. Not saying you have to read more than 1 or 2, but it gives you options.

2. I've found the screen to be no harder to read than paper. If you cannot see your book well you won't this either.

3. I can do a few more things such as play music, and hold newspapers and magazines. It also has options to pick up RSS feeds for popular sights.

4. It will not replace all his books. Like you said some aren't on it, and some are just better to buy 1/2 priced used. It kind of annoys me when my wife buys one not on the Kindle. I usually feel offended "Why are you reading that paperback?". But honestly that is just me feeling she somehow does not like the gift. When really it was probably and impulse buy at the store.

If you take it for what it is, and don't put it into the iPad level of device. The price is very good. Show me any other device on the market where the data plan is built into the device itself? Let's say you could get a 3G card for your netbook for an insanely low $10/month. In 1 year you'd almost pay for this e-book that gives it too you as part of the cost. I hate monthly fees, and one less fee in my life is a bonus.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Aikouka on 7/29/2010 12:21:21 PM , Rating: 2
Out of curiosity, does your wife have a smartphone? It might be worthwhile to try and get her used to seeing a book and instead of just buying it, checking her phone to purchase a book. I'm not sure exactly how the Kindle works in regard to sharing between devices, but you could possibly buy a book using Amazon software on the phone and then put it on your Kindle.

It might seem like a bit of a hassle, but it can save you money in the long run, and getting in that habit can also save you money on other things. For example, I usually poke around the electronics section of stores like Target, and if I see a good deal, I usually check Amazon to see if the price is really good enough. It's pretty handy! :)


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By bhieb on 8/2/2010 10:09:51 AM , Rating: 2
Oh how I wish she was capable of that kind of frugality. She comes from a wealthy background. I'm lucky just to get her in Target, let alone ask her to look at a price tag.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Landiepete on 7/29/2010 11:34:13 AM , Rating: 2
This is obviously a reply from someone that either does not read a lot, or never leaves home.
The advantage is that you don't have to decide what you're going to read on your trip, commute or holiday before you leave. You also don't have to schlep 20 novels around depending on what mood you could be in.
You can read what you want whenever you want, and decide what you're going to read next when you finish the previous one.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By hughlle on 7/29/2010 9:38:16 AM , Rating: 2
I have never taken a trip that has given me the spare time to read 20 books.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Reclaimer77 on 7/29/2010 6:04:09 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Some find value with an entire library being condensed into one device.


Yes and some, like him, find value in real books. What makes him wrong and you right?

When I go on trips I couldn't possibly read 20 books or even want to. What's the point in going on a trip if all you're doing is reading apparently? When I read, I usually read a page-turner. Where I feel absolutely compelled to read it start to finish. The idea of stopping half-way and reading a different book for "variety" is absolutely foreign to me.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Smilin on 7/30/2010 10:42:01 AM , Rating: 2
Read faster. :P

Seriously though..

I'm on the "it's valuable to carry many books in an eReader" side of this argument but that's because I've seen the value in an avid reader like my Wife.

I'm about a 1-2 book on vacation guy myself but even then it's nice to carry some 8oz thing instead of a full book. New books are typically hardbound which is a bitch in a backpack.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By quiksilvr on 7/29/2010 8:53:03 AM , Rating: 2
Here's your solution:

http://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?t=...

Now go back to the '90s.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By MozeeToby on 7/29/2010 10:28:56 AM , Rating: 2
I'm at about 50 purchased books so far on my Kindle 2 plus about a half dozen free ones. I was keeping track of how much I saved and spent for a while, but eventually gave up. When I stopped keeping track I was saving an average of about $2.75 per book. I saved around $150 on books and could probably sell my kindle for at least $75 (still in 'like new' condition) so I'd say I'm at about the break even point.

Of course that says nothing about getting to read books that are difficult to find in paperback (the opposite is also true and some books just aren't available on the Kindle) and the convenience of shopping for a new book from my bed and being able to read it moments late. On balance I'd call it a win, but I read more than most.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By LRonaldHubbs on 7/29/2010 10:43:47 AM , Rating: 2
Bear with me here for a minute. I've heard this same statement from other people besides yourself, and I'm really trying to understand it.

Gripes that I've always had with books are:
1) They take up quite a bit of space.
2) They require effort to maintain the intended page.
3) They are easily damaged, especially if you have sweaty hands.
4) There is no efficient way to search for anything unless you marked it the first time through.
5) The smell of printed pages is not particularly appealing.

Nothing about the experience of reading books has ever been enjoyable for me. Everything about it is just horribly inconvenient. E-book readers can change all of that.

For these reasons, I am completely dumbfounded when people suggest that the feel of a book is in any way a good thing. I'm really trying to understand this, so please explain.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By sviola on 7/29/2010 11:24:34 AM , Rating: 1
It's called fear of change. People are usually reticent to changing their habits. Add in the equation that many people shun technology and you get a complete picture.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By AmbroseAthan on 7/29/2010 9:25:34 AM , Rating: 2
These are not meant to be money saving devices or for people who are looking to only read a few books a year. Personally I got my Kindle in December and at this point I have read 41 books on it (mostly all bought, only read a couple of free classics).

And my favorite feature lately being I have an HTC EVO, is I can sync the last page read over the cell towers between my Kindle and Android Kindle (Nook can now do this as well) so I am at the same spot on both devices whenever I pull one out. Perfect for office bathroom breaks! I pull out my phone, read a few pages, and when I pick up my Kindle outside the office, I am at the same spot.

While I miss having a real book and the paper, the e-readers offer some great advantages paper books can not.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By isayisay on 7/29/2010 9:46:08 AM , Rating: 2
the sync is a great idea for exactly the reasons you outlined... may push me over the edge to finally pull the trigger on a newer phone


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 9:28:22 AM , Rating: 2
You save about five bucks a book (rough estimate of my own experiences).

So say 25 books and it's paid for.

Now throw in just a small handful of 100% free books from one of the *many* sources and that number drops quickly.

I bought a first generation Kindle for my wife way back when prices were much higher. At the rate she reads the thing paid itself off in about 6 months and we've saved a ton of money since.


RE: $139 isn't bad...
By bhieb on 7/29/2010 10:15:04 AM , Rating: 2
I am not an avid reader, but my wife is. She likes the convenience of it. Although one may not read 20 books on a short trip, it is nice to have the option of what book you feel in the mood to read.

Really considering this has built in 3G at no monthly charge, the price is quite reasonable.

Personally I'm glad they kept the display. The battery life is what sets the e-ink apart. Once you turn off the radio, these things last a REALLY long time. Since no power is used unless painting a page. Where the iPad may be measured in hours, this thing is measured in days. General consensus is that it is around 3000 pages. My wife charges her's about once a month.

Let's face it, anyone in the market for any of these devices has some money to spare. Most likely they have a laptop already, a PC, and a phone. So as a book, IMO this thing blows the iPad away. If I want to do more, I'll grab my netbook. It is a load your books, throw it on the nightstand and read at your leisure device. Very low maintenance, but as you alluded to definitely a luxury not meant to be cost justified.


Not adding much
By BigToque on 7/29/2010 10:28:21 AM , Rating: 2
To people who ask "who the hell wants to bring 20 books with them?"

My uncle is one of those people. He's some big shot in the financial industry and is always flying around. He showed me his kindle (the original) and couldn't stop talking about how awesome it is. He reads ALL the time. Any time he's got free time he's reading a new book.

For people like my uncle, this kind of device is perfect.

I'd be interested in seeing one of these in person, because the original was pretty sweet.




RE: Not adding much
By BigToque on 7/29/2010 10:32:19 AM , Rating: 2
Sorry, one other example...

My aunt is a university professor and frequently teaches at 2-3 universities. She says she loves the kindle because it allows her to carry almost all of her text books for reference material. Says it definitely beats carrying about a bunch of books.


RE: Not adding much
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 1:59:38 PM , Rating: 2
Wife. Same.


RE: Not adding much
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 4:01:44 PM , Rating: 2
Who coincidentally just sent me this IM:

quote:

Ohh. New Kindle version coming out late August for $189. Drooling


RE: Not adding much
By Smilin on 7/30/2010 10:43:26 AM , Rating: 2
...and this morning it's offical. Getting a 3G one for her birthday next month.

Probably give her Gen1 away to a family member.


RE: Not adding much
By Calabim on 7/29/2010 4:05:40 PM , Rating: 2
On a normal vacation I will chew through 2 or 3 books per week, while on business trips I usually read twice that. Have had trips where when I came back half my pack was full of books, just because I kept buying new ones.

HavenĀ“t been able to get a Kindle with 3G at reasonable price due to living in the EU, but with the UK storing having it, I am definitely getting one.


Not worth the money...
By Icehearted on 7/31/2010 4:42:13 AM , Rating: 2
In all honesty, if I wanted something I could use for reading, I'd think the amount they're asking for would push me more toward an... ugh, iPad or similar device. Not to mention that with a tablet, I can do a lot more, and Amazon can't yank anything out that I don't want yanked.




RE: Not worth the money...
By FaceMaster on 7/31/2010 4:22:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Not to mention that with a tablet, I can do a lot more, and Amazon can't yank anything out that I don't want yanked.


Amen, brother. I love being able to yank one out over any material I want to view.


RE: Not worth the money...
By Smilin on 8/2/2010 10:52:28 AM , Rating: 2
So Amazon who has yanked one book (because they sold it when they didn't have a license for it...and gave a refund) scares you but you're willing to look at an iPad?

How many apps has apple yanked?


Maybde the lack of features is a good thing.
By priusone on 7/29/2010 3:41:00 AM , Rating: 2
When I bought my Hitachi G100, I told myself that I'd put some books into text files and read them. Surfed the web and played games.
When I bought my Treo650, I said the same thing. I surfed the web, listened to music, and surfed the web.
Then I got an AsusEEE. With such a low res display, I surely would use it to read at least one book. Then I found out linux had a few games. And it did surf the web pretty good.
Now I have a Droid, with an ebook app, and here I am surfing the web.
With an obvious case of ADD, that Kindle looks better and better. Sure, it can surf the web, but not as well as my other gadgets. At $139, I might actually find a digital device that I will finish reading a book on.




By priusone on 7/29/2010 3:45:58 AM , Rating: 3
And maybe I'm going to bed since it's late and I can't spell certain words.


sony e-reader
By makhayantini on 7/30/10, Rating: 0
RE: sony e-reader
By Smilin on 7/30/2010 10:45:25 AM , Rating: 1
So now you're going to bless us with an advertisement link?

Can someone who hasn't posted yet rate this dick down? Much appreciated.


RE: sony e-reader
By FaceMaster on 7/31/2010 4:20:01 PM , Rating: 2
Don't worry, I've voted him down since I haven't posted yet.

Oops...


RE: sony e-reader
By Smilin on 8/2/2010 5:29:31 PM , Rating: 2
Thanks man. I rated you up for your efforts. :)


E-books are not re-sellable
By Ananke on 7/29/2010 1:56:02 PM , Rating: 2
E-readers locked to a certain carrier, like Amazon for example or Barns&Noble, should be free...E-books are not re-sellable, you can never break even the cost of the device, compared to a person who sells his paper books. The only way to break even is to use it for reading free classic books, which otherwise will have some paperback cost, and considering you are not getting those from a library...So, as of today, these are still restrictive and costly for what they offer devices. Maybe, for the carry convenience, they would be worth say $50?

On the other hand, if a device is trully unrestricted to an e-book store or format, it is certainly worth its money. But here we approach the tablets territory.

The e-book market is already approaching the type of the wireless phone market - locked devices should be free. Hopefully, soon we will see some good universal readers too.




RE: E-books are not re-sellable
By DrApop on 7/29/2010 2:11:23 PM , Rating: 2
I've never sold a paperback book after reading it...I had stacks in my house that I either threw out or donated to the library (infrequent). I don't trade books with my friends either. On occasion I have had a friend that said, "hey, this looks like a good book you have here. Can I borrow it." And I say, "Sure, you can have it."

But I don't go around bartering my reading material. And I think a lot of people are the same way. For those who have to become merchants and barters in order to read a book...well then eReaders may not be for you. For the majority out there however; reading and keeping the books is just fine.


Anyone else noticing a pattern
By mcnabney on 7/29/10, Rating: 0
RE: Anyone else noticing a pattern
By Smilin on 7/29/2010 11:19:18 AM , Rating: 2
It's just adding some depth to the article man. "it's on AT&T" just has a kind of boring ring to it don't you think.

As far as bias...you're the one arguing with an independed review. I'm a Verizon fan myself but facts are facts.


The Computer
By DrApop on 7/29/2010 11:19:34 AM , Rating: 2
Most of you are stuck in the same box...why do I need to carry/read 20 books on my trip. That is not the point.

Why were people paying 3-4K for a DOS computer in the 80's just to type letters and a spreadsheet or two.

For most of us, the price we pay for our computers, the software, the games, the printers, etc is never paid back by our level of home use....yet we still buy it.

Reading on a Kindle is actually easier (for me) than having to hold open a book. I find it much more convenient. I can read book samples and purchase books on the fly. I'm not a major heavy reader...maybe 2 books a month +. But having owned a Kindle since Feb 2008, I have come to really enjoy reading on an electronic device and prefer it over paper books.

As an aside, textbooks, manuals, picture books are better in paper because of the way they are used. But if you are a general mass market paperback or hard cover reader then eReaders are da bomb!




e book
By neilmacengi on 8/9/2010 8:03:25 AM , Rating: 2
Personally speaking, I am still using my Dell Pocket PC that I bought 5 years ago when I first discovered ebooks. When it breaks, I guess I'll have to decide what to do next. However, I want a PDA that serves multiple purposes like my current one.
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